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FOR. THE YEAR 

(sxiiai-xxtnka- TEAR dE Mfertt), 



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SOLD BY Z, P. MABUYA & Co. 
1889. 



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IMPERIAL UNIYERSITY OF JAPAN. 

(Teikoku Daigaku.J 



THE 



CALENDAR 

FOR THE YEAR 

1889-90. 

(Xnina-XXnira TBAB OF ICBUI.) 



TOKYO: 

PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY. 



SOLD BY Z. P. MARUYA & Co. 
1889. 



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TABLE OF COFTEKTS. 



Page 

I. Calendar 2 

IT. History and Organization 4 

III. University Officers : 24 

IV, General Regulations for tho Colleges 26 

1. Academic year, Terms and Vacations ■. 26 

2. Conditions of Admission and Attendance 26 

3. Suspension of Attendance 29 

4. Examinations and Certificates. 30 

5. Post-graduate Studies 34. 

6. Unpaid and Paid Assistants 36 

7. Elective Studies ; 37 

8. Honour Students , 39 

9. Loan Scholarships 3.9 

10. Scientific Excursions 46 

II. Fees and other Expenses 47 

12. Rei)ayment of Loan Scholarships 48 

13. Residence and Discipline of Students 49 

14. Recreation and Physical Exercises 52 

V. College of Law 54 

1. Officers 54 

2. Courses of Instruction 56 

VI. College of Medicine 62 

1. Officers 62 

2. Courses of Instruction 64 

3. Regulations for Final Examinations in Medicine 68 

4. By-laws to the Regulations for Elective Students .... 79 

5. By-laws to the Regulations for post-graduate Studies . 80 

6. Laboratories 81 

7. Hospitak, &c ^ 81 



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ii contents. 

Page 

VII. College of Engineering .......* 83 

1. Officers 83 

2. Courses of Instruction, Laboratories, Workshop, &c . . 83 
VIII. College of Literature 97 

1. Officers 97 

2. Courses of Instruction 98 

IX; College of Science 114 

1. Officers 114 

2. Courses of Instruction, Laboratories, Botanic Garden, 

&c 115 

X. University Hall 129 

Regulations and Conditions of Admission 129 

XL Library 132 

XII. List of Students 140 

XIII. List of Gakushi and other Graduates 167 

XIV. List of Hakushi 192 

APPENDIX. President Watanabe's Address on the Occasion 

of the Annual Graduation Ceremony, July 10th 1889 . . 197 



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CALEMQArR. 



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IMPERIAL UNIVERSITY OF JAPAN. 


1889. 


0. 


M. 


T. W. 


rh. 


F. 


S. 


Summer Vacation ends, 


September. 


1 


2 


3 4 


5 


6 


7 


lOtli. 




8 


9 


10 11 


12 


13 


14 


First Term begins, 12t]i. 




15 


16 


17 18 


19 


20* 


21 


Holiday of the Shiulcl 




22 


23 


24 25 


26 


27 


28 


Korei Sai, 23rd. 




29 


30 












October, 






1 2 


3 


4 


5 


Holiday of the Kanname 




6 


7 


8 9 


10 


11 


12 


Matsuriy 17tli. 




13 


14 


15 16 


17 


18 


19 






20 


21 


22 23 


24 


25 


26 






27 


28 


29 30 


31 


1 


2 


His Majesty's Birthday, 


November. 


3 


4 


5 6 


7 


8 


9 


3rd. 




10 


11 


12 13 


14 


15 


16 


HoUday of the Mlname 




17 


18 


19 20 


21 


22 


23 


Maisuri, 23rd. 




24: 


25 


26 27 


28 


29 


30 




December. 


1 


2 


3. 4 


5 


6 


7 


First Term ends, 24th. 




8 


9 


10 11 


12 


13 


14 


Winter Vacation begins, 




15 


16 


17 18 


19 


20 


21 


25th. 




22 


23 


24 25 


26 


27 


28 






29 


30 


31 










1890. 
















January. 






1 


2 


3 


4 


Winter Vacation ends, 




5 


G 


7 8 





10 


11 


7th. 




12 


13 


14 15 


16 


17 


18 


Second Term begins, 8th. 




19 


20 


21 22 


23 


24 


25 


HoUday of the Komei 




26 


27 


28 29 


30 


31 




Tenno Sai, 30th. 



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CALENDAR FOR l 889-90. 



1890. 


.^. 


M. 


T. 


W. 


Th. 


F. 


S. 


Holiday of the Kigen 
Setsu, 11th. I 


February. 














1 






2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 






9 


10 


11 


12 


[13 


14 


15 






16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 






23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 






March. 














1 


Anniversary of the Uni- 




2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


versity, 1st. 




9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


Holiday of the SunJcl 




16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


Korei Sai, 21st,. 




23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


Second Term ends, 31st. 




30 


31 














Apiil. 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


Spring Vacation begins, 




6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


1st. I 




13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


Spring Vacation ends, [ 




20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


7th. 1 




27 


28 


29 


30 








Third Term begins, 8th. 


May. 










1 


2 


3 






4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 






11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 






18 


10 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 






25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 




June. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


Term Work ceases, 17th. 




8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


Annual Examinations 




15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


begin, 21st. 




22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


! 




29 


30 














July. 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


Third Term ends, 10th. 




6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


Slimmer Vacation begins, 




13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


11th. 




20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 






27 


28 


29 


30 


31. 









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HISTOBY AKD OEGAKIZA'IION. 



II. SUMMARY OF HISTORY AND 
ORGANIZATION. 

Inasmuch as the Teikoku Daigaku or Imperial 
University owes its existence to the union of the late 
Toky5 Daigaku and Kobu Daigakko, it seems fitting that, 
in tracing its history, reference should be made to the 
origin of these two institutions. 

The four Departments of Law, Science, Medicine, and 
Literature, which composed the Tokyo Daigaku, sxorang, 
with the one exception of the Department of Medicine, 
from an institution of some antiquity founded by the 
Tokugawa Government, and known first as the Yogakujo, 
and afterwards as the Kaiseijo. This institution was, 
after the restoration of 1868, revived by the ImxDerial 
Government, and in January of the following year it 
opened its doors anew for the first time. Special attention 
was devoted to instruction in English and French, to 
which languages German was soon afterwards added. In' 
December of the same year, the College received the 
name of Daigaku Nanko or South College, because of its 
location at Hitotsubashi to the South of the Central 
Daigaku, to which it was attached. The Central Daigaku 
was situated in the old Gakumonjo at Yushima. 

The Daigaku having been abolished in the year 
1871, the Daigaku Nanko, known simply as the Nanko, 
came directly under the control of the Department of 
Education ; and in the following year, when the country 
was mapped out into educational districts, it received the 
name of the First Middle School of the First Grand 
Educational District. 



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HISTORY AND OBGANIZATION, 5 

111 AiDiil of 1873 the name of the institution was 
changed to Kaisei-Gakk5, and special courses of studies 
were instituted in Law, Chemistry, Engineering, Poly- 
technics and Mining. In the same year the institution 
was transferred to the new buildings just completed at 
No. 1 NisHiKicHO Sanch5me (Hitotsubashi Soto). 

In 1874 the word " Tokyo " was lorefixed to the name 
of the institution, and it was called the Tokyo Kaisei 
Gakko. 

In April of 1876, the Department of Education united 
this institution and the Toky5 Igakko or Medical College, 
so as to form the Toky5 Daigaku or Tokyo University, 
comiDrising the four Departments of Law, Science, Medi- 
cine and Literature. The DejDartments of Law, Science 
and Literature were combined in one institution and one 
President was appointed for all three. Another President 
had charge of the Medical Department. 

The Medical Department sprang out of the Igakujo, 
an institution in Shitaya originally belonging to the 
Tokugawa Government, and revived by the Imperial 
Government in 1868. 

In the following year, this School and the Hospital 
established for the tending of the wounded in the war of 
1868, were united under the name of the Medical School 
and Hospital. Soon afterwards the combined institution 
was attached to the Daigaku and received the name of 
Daigaku Toko or East College, because of its position to 
the East of the Central Daigaku. In 1871 it shortened 
its name to Toko, and in 1872 assumed the name of Igakko 
or Medical College in the First Grand Educational Dis- 
trict, which title was again changed to Tokyo Igakko in 
the year 1874. 



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b HISTORY AND ORGANIZATION'. 

In 1876, the new buildings at Hongo having been 
completed, the College was transferred thither from 
Shitaya. In 1877 the College became the Medical Depart- 
ment of the Tokyo Daigaku or Tokyo University. 

In 1881, the organization of the Tokyo Daigaku was 
modified by the ai3i3ointment of a President who should 
hare control not only of the four Departments of Law, 
Science, Medicine and Literature, but also of the Pre- 
paratory School. In September of 1884, the Departments 
of Law and Literature removed to the new brick building 
in Kaga Yashiki, Hongo. 

During the year 1885, various changes occurred. 
The Central office of the University was transferred to a 
building in the compound at Hongo, the Preparatory 
School dissolved its connection with the University and 
became an indejDendent institution, the Department of 
Science also removed to Hongo, and the Tokyo Hogakko 
or Law School, under the control of the Dej^artment of 
J\istice, was merged in the University. Also in the same 
year, the Department of Technology was created, and 
courses in Mechanical and Civil Engineering, Mining, 
Applied Chemistry, Naval Architecture and kindred 
subjects were transferred to the new department from 
the Science Department. The course of x>olitics in the 
Literature Department was likewise transferred to the 
Law Department, henceforward to be known as the 
DexDartment of Law and Politics. 

The KoBU Daigakko, originally known as the K5gak- 
k6, was instituted in 1871 in connection with the Bureau 
of Engineering in the Public Works Department of the 
Imx^erial Government. The institution was in 1872 di- 
vided into the College and the Preparatory School. In 



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HISTORY AJsD ORGAKIZATIOX. 7 

1874, the Preparatory School was actually opened for 
instruction in Yamato-Yashiki, Tameike, and in 1876 an 
Art School was created in connection with the College. 

In 1877, the Bureau of Engineering was abolished, 
and the College was thenceforth called the Kobu Daigak- 
Ko or Im^Derial College of Engineering. The same year 
witnessed the comiDletion of the large new buildings at 
Toranomon, containing a central hall, class-rooms, labo- 
ratories, dormitories, and the full equipment necessar}^ 
for such an institution. 

In June 1882, the term of engagement of the head- 
professor IVIr. Henry Dyer expired. He first arrived 
in JajDan in June 1873, was appointed headprofessor, 
and occupied, at the same time, the chair of Civil 
Engineering. When he first arrived, the College was 
still in its infancy, and he set himself to plan the 
curriculum and formulated the various College rules and 
regulations. He also planned the college building. As 
headprofessor, he discharged his duties with untiring 
diligence for the long period of almost ten years. For 
these reasons, when he was leaving Japan, he was deco- 
rated with the third order of the Eising Sun, and was 
also appointed honorary headprofessor of the Engineering 
College. 

In 1882, the Art School was discontinued. In 1885, 
the Department of Public Works was abolished, an event 
which caused the College to be transferred to the control 
of the Department of Education. 

In the late Tokyo Daigaku and Kobu Daigakko, the 
following degrees were conferred on the graduates by 
their respective authorities ; HogahusM in the Department 



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8 HISTORY AND ORGANIZATION. 

of Law ; Bigakushi in Science ; Igakushi in Medicine ; 
Bungakushi in LiteraiiU'e ; and KogahusM in Engineering. 

On the 1st. of March, 1886, the Imi^erial Ordinance 
No. 3 was promulgated for the organization of the Tei- 
KOKu Daigaku or Imperial University, and the Tokyo 
Daigaku and Kobu Daigakko were merged in the new in- 
stitution. H. E. HiROMOTo Watanabe, then the Governor 
of Tokyo, was appointed President of the University. 

In April, curricula of instruction for the several 
Colleges of the University were established. Each 
course extends over three years, excepting the course in 
Medicine, which extends over four years. In the same 
month, the Tokyo Shokko Gakko (School of Industrial 
Technology) was placed under the control of the Univer- 
sity. 

In November, the five principal private Law Schools 
in the city were i^laced under the supervision of the 
University. A supervising committee for these Schools 
was formed among the professors of the College of Law, 
who became responsible for the courses of instruction and 
the method of examining the students. 

In December of the same year, a Marine Zoological 
Station was established at Misaki, a town situated at 
Cape Miura, in Sagami. 

In May, 1887, the Imperial Ordinance No. 13 was 
l^romulgated, establishing regulations for Learned De- 
grees, and in June of the same year by-laws connected 
with these regulations were issued by the Minister of 
State for Education. These two documents will be found 
in full, further on in the Calendar. 

In July, it was decided that graduates of the Colleges 
should be entitled to call themselves Edgahushi, Igaku- 



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HISTOEY AND ORGAHIZATIOI^. V 

^hi ( Yakugakiishi in the case of graduates in tlie course of 
Pharmacy), Kogakushi, BungaJcuslii and RigdkusKi respec- 
tively, according to the course which they had pursued, 
and that Jun-igahushi of the Tokyo Daigaku, and gra- 
duates of the KoBU Daigakko who had not received 
degrees, should be allowed to call themselves Igakushi 
and Kogakushi respectively, after obtaining the sanction 
•of the President of the University ; to whom a formal 
application must be made, and a history given at length 
of their professional career after graduation. 

In October, the Tokyo Shokko Gikko was separated 
from the University. 

In March 1888, the powers and duties of the President 
of the University were formally fixed by the Minister of 
State for Education. 

In the same month, a notification was issued by the 
Edacation Department regulating the income from 
tuition fees and various other sources, of all educational 
institutions under the direct control of the Department, 
with the object of supjplying each with a capital fund. 

In May, the University was released from the duty 
of supervising the five principal lorivate law schools in 
T5kyo. 

The Tokyo Observatory was established at ligura in 
the month of June. This institution, formed by the 
amalgamation with the University Observatory of the 
Astronomical Section of the Home Department and the 
Astronomical Observatory of the Imperial Navy, was 
placed under the control of the Imperial University, which 
was accordingly entrusted with the duty of joublishing 
the Astronomical Almanac. 



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10 HISTORY AND OEGANIZAIION. 

On July 31st, the College of Engineering was moved 
to the new brick building just completed for its use in 
the comi)ound at Hongo. 

On the 30th October of the same year, a " Temporary 
Committee for the Compilation of the National History " was 
established. This was due to the disestablishment of the 
"Temi)orary Board for the Compilation of the National 
History in the Naikaku", and to the subsequent entrust- 
ing of the work to the Imperial University. 

On the 20fch December of the same year, the College 
of Science was removed to the new building then com- 
pleted. 



The Imperial University is under the control of the 
Minister of State for Education and depends for its 
revenue u]3on annual allowances from the Treasury of 
the Imperial Government. The tuition fees and other 
sources of income are allowed to accumulate year by 
year so as to form a large fund. A certain portion of this 
fund is, however, to be paid out in some cases towards the 
current expenditure of the University, when the cases are 
of such a nature as to demand the outlay. 

The whole University-^ i;i2; ; the offices of the Univer- 
sity, the University Library, the Colleges of Law, Medicine, 
Engineering, Literature and Science, the First Hospital 
of the College of Medicine, and the Dormitories of the 
Colleges, — is situated in the extensive grounds at Moto- 
fujicho, Hongo, Tokyo, known as Kaga-yashiki. The 
Botanic Garden is located at Koishikawa, the Tokyo 
Observatory belonging to the University at ligura, and 



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HISTOEY A^^D OEGANIZATIOX. 11 

the Second Hospital of tlie Medical College at Shitaya, all 
within the city limits. The Marine Biological Station of 
the University is situated at Misaki, a town on the north 
side of the entrance to the Bay of Tokyo. 

The Imperial Ordinances, and the notification and 
instructions of the DejDartment of Education relating to 
the University run as follows : — 

(1.) 

Imperial Ordinance 

for the founding of the Imperial University. 

We hereby give Our Sanction to the present Ordinance 
relating to the Imperial University and order it to he pro- 
mulgated. 

HiH Imp)erial Majesty's Sign-Manual. 

[^Privy Seal] 

Dated the 1st day of the Srd month of the Idth year of Meiji, 

Countersigned by 

CoiTJsT 1x6 HiEOBUMI, 

Mbiister President cf State. 

MoEi Aeinoei, 

Minister of State for Education. 



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12 HISTORY AND ORGANIZATION. 

Imperial Ordinance No. 3. 
Constitution of the Imperial University. 

ART. I. 

The Imperial University shall have for its objects 
the teaching of such arts and sciences as are required for 
the j)urposes of the State, and the prosecution of original 
investigations in such arts and sciences. 

ART. n. 

The ImxDerial University shall consist of the Univer- 
sity Hall and the Colleges : the University Hall is 
established for the purpose of original investigations, 
and the Colleges for that of instructiou, theoretical and 
IDiactical. 

ART. in. 

Certificates of graduation shall be awarded to stu- 
dents, who shall have completed any one of the courses 
in the Colleges, and shall have passed the examinations 
presciibed by the statute. 

ART. IV. 

The Imperial University shall confer degrees upon 
those who, either being graduates of one of the Colleges 
or being deemed to be of equal standing with such 
graduates, shall have prosecuted original investigations 
in the University Hall, and shall have passed the required 
examinations. 

ART. V. 

The officers of the Imperial University shall be 
as follows : — ^President (of Cliokunin rank), Councillors, 
Secretaries (Sdnin), and Clerks {Hanniv). 



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HISTORY AKD OEGAXIZATION. 13 



AET. VL 



The President shall superintend all the affairs of 
the Imx^erial University under the direction of the Minis- 
ter of State for Education. The duties of the President 
are chiefly as follows : — 

(1) To maintain order in the Imperial Univer- 

(2) To see after the condition of the Imperial 
University and to submit suggestions to the 
Minister for any improvement he may deem 
necessary. 

(3) To preside over the meetings and discus- 
sions of the Councillors, and to report to the 
Minister the ^proceedings thereof. 

(4) To act as Director of the Law College. j 

AET. 711. 

The meetings of the Councillors shall be held either 
at the Imperial University or at the Department of 
Education, as convenience may require. Matters to be 
submitted to the Councillors for their deliberation are as 
follows : — 

(1) The curricula of studies. 

(2) The j)romotion of the interests of the Uni- 
versity and of each College. 

AET. vni. 

Councillors shall be selected and appointed by the 
Minister of State for Education from among the Pro- 
fessors, two from each College. 



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14 HISTORY AND ORGANIZATION. 



ABT. IX. 



The appointment of the Councillors shall be for a 
term of five years and may be renewed on the expiration 
of that term. 

ART. X. 

The Colleges of the University shall be designated 
as follows :— College of Law, College of Medicine, Col- 
lege of Engineering, College of Literature, and College 
of Science. 

The College of Law is divided into two sections, 
Law and Politics. 

ART. XL 

The staJBE of each College shall be as follows : — 
Director (of Sonin rank), Chief -Professor, Professors, 
(Sdnin), Assistant-Professors (Sonin), Superintendent of 
the Dormitories (Sdnin), and Clerks (Hannin), 

ART. XII. 

The Director of each College shall be selected and 
appointed from among its Professors. He shall superin- 
tend the affairs of the College under the guidance of the 
President of the Im^Derial University. 

ART. xni. 

The Chief-Professor of each College shall be ajDr 
pointed from among its Professors. He shall see to the 
X^roper discharge of their duties by Professors and As- 
sistant-Professors, and to the maintenance of order in 
lecture-rooms. 



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HISTORY AND ORGANIZATION. 15 

AET. XIV. 

The number of Professors and Assistant-Professors 
in each College shall be determined by the Minister of 
State for Education according to the importance of the 
subjects taught and the number of students. 



(2.) 
Imperial Ordinance relating to Degrees. 

We hereby give Our Sanction to the present Ordinance 

relating to Degrees, and order the same to he promulgated. 

His Imperial Majesty's Sign-Manual. 

[Frivy Seal.'] 

Dated the 20th day of the 5th month of the 
20th year of Meiji. 

Countersigned by 

Count Ito Hirobumi. 

Minister President of State, 

Viscount Mori Arinori, 

Minister of State for Education. 



Imperial Ordinance No. 13. 
Regulations for Degrees. 

AET. I. 

Degrees shall be of two classes, Eakushi and Dai- 
hakushi. 



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16 HISTORY AKD 0KGANIZATI01S\ 



ART. II. 



The Degree of Hakushi shall be of five kinds: — 
Edgahu (Law) Hakushi, Jgaku (Medicine) Hakushi, Kd- 
gaku (Engineering) Hakushi, Bungaku (Literature) Haku- 
shi, and Rigaku (Science) Hakushi. 

ART. III. 

The Degree of Hakushi shall be conferred by the 
Minister of State for Education upon such persons as have 
passed the prescribed examinations at the University 
Hall ; and upon such others as, after reference to the 
Council of the Imperial University, are considered by 
the Minister to possess attainments equal to, or higher 
than, those of the persons above mentioned. 

ART. IV. 

The Degree of Daihakushi shall be conferred by the 
Minister of State for Education, after reference to the 
assembly of Hakushi, and after approval received from 
the Cabinet, upon such persons as are deemed specially 
meritorious in science or arts. 

ART. V. 

By-laws relating to the present Ordinance shall be 
made by the Minister of State for Education. 



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HISTOKY AI?D ORGANIZATION. 17 

(3.) 
Notification No. 4 

of the Department of Education giving by-laws 
relating to the Regulations for Degrees. 



By-laws relating to the Eegitlations for Degrees are hereby 
prescnhed in accordance with Art, V of ^^ Imperial Ordinance 
No, 13 " concerning Degrees (issued in the 5th month of the 
present year). 

Dated the 2olh day of ifie ^tli montli of ilie 
2Wi year of Meiji, 

Viscount Mori Arinort, 

Minister of State for Education. 



By-laws relating to the Regulations for Degrees. 

ART. I. 

The Degree of Hahiiski shall be conferred as 
follows: — 

The Hogahu (Law) Hakushi shall be conferred upon 
persons who have specially studied the subjects pre^ 
scribed in the College of Law ; the Igaku (Medicine) 
Hakushi, upon persons who have specially studied the 
subjects prescribed in the College of Medicine ; the 
Kogakn (Engineering) Hakushi, upon persons who have 
specially studied the subjects prescribed in the College 
of Engineering ; the Bungaku (Literature) Hakushi, 
upon persons who have specially studied the subjects 
prescribed in the College of Literature; and the Eigakii 



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18 HISTORY AND ORGANIZATION. 

(Science) Hakushh upon jDersons who have specially 
studied the subjects prescribed in the College of Science. 

ART. IT. 

The Degree of Hakushi shall be conferred by the 
Minister of State for Education upon persons who have 
been admitted to the University Hall and have passed 
the prescribed examinations thereof, after notice has been 
given by the President of the Imperial University. 

ART. IIL 

The Degree of Hakushi shall be conferred by the 
Minister of State for Education upon such persons as are 
considered by him to possess-^ attainments equal to, or 
higher than, those of persons who have been admitted to 
the University Hall, and have passed the prescribed ex- 
aminations therein, provided that the qualifications of such 
candidates shall have been first submitted to the Council 
of the Imperial University, and approved by not fewer 
than two-thirds of all the members of such Council. 

ART. IV. 

Candidates for the Degree of Hakushi may apply 
for the same to the Minister of State for Education ; 
each application to be accompanied by a brief personal 
record, together with a thesis composed by the candidate 
on some subject specially studied by him. 

ART. V. 
In the case of candidates under Art. Ill, the Council of 
the Imperial University may, if necessary, hold examinations. 
KB, — Such examinations are not compulsory. 



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HISTOKY AISD ORGANIZATION. 19 



ART. YI. 



The Degree of Daihatushi shall be conferred by 
ihe Minister of State for Education upon persons deemed 
by him specially meritorious in science or arts, whose 
qualifications, having been discussed by the Assembly 
of Hokushiy shall have been approved by not less than 
two-thirds of the members actually present, and shall 
afterwards have been submitted to and confirmed by the 
'Cabinet. 

ART. vir. 

Matters relating to the Assembly of Hakushi shall 
be managed by a committee appointed by the Minister 
-of State for Education, and no Assembly shall be held 
unless at least twenty Hakushi be present. 

ART. YIII. 

The place of meeting and the date of session of the 
Assembly of Hakushi shall in each case be published 
five weeks previously in the Official Gazette. 

ART. IX. 

Rules relating to the examinations under Art. 
V, shall be framed by the President of the Imperial 
University. 

ART. X. 

The forms for Degree Certificates shall be as 
follows : — 



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20 



HISTORY AND OEGANIZATION. 



DEGREE CERTIFICATE.* 



Title, order of decoration, 

rank, legal residence, 

and social class. 

The Degree of HalcusM is hereby con- 
ferred on the aforesaid according to Art. 

in of " Imperial Ordinance No. 13 " concerning De- 
grees, issued in the 20th year of Meiji. 

Dated this day of the month 

of the year. 



Seal of the 

Department 

of 

Education. 



Minister of State 
for Education, 
title, order of decoration, 
$,nd rank, 
(seal). 



Counterfoil of seal. 



No. 



* Certificates conferred tinder the 1st proviso of Art. Ill of 
"Imperial Ordinance No. 13" relating to Degrees are distinguished 
by red borders ; those under the 2nd proviso, by green borders. 



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HISTORY AND OBGANIZATION. 



21 



DEGREE CERTIFICATE.* 



Title, order of decoration, 

rank, legal residence, 

and social class. 

The Degree of Daihakushi is hereby conferred 

on the aforesaid according to Art. IV 

of "Imperial Ordinance No. 13" concerning De- 
grees, issued in the 20th year of Meiji. 

Dated this day of the month 

of the year. 



Seal of the 

Department 

of 

Education. 



Minister of State 

for Education, 

title, order of decoration, 

and rank, 

(seal). 



Counterfoil of seal. 



No. 



* These certificates are distinguished by black borders. 



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22 HISTOKY AND ORGANIZATION. 

(4.) 

Instructions from the Department of Education^ 

dated June 26tli, 1886. 



Regulations for Meetings of Councillors of the 
Imperial University. 

ART. I. 

The meetings of the Councillors of the Imperial 
University shall be held at such times as the Minister of 
State for Education or the President of the University may 
think fit, or at the joint request of more than three 
Councillors. 

ART. n. 

All matters for deliberation shall be submitted to 
the Councillors at their meetings by the President of tha 
University. 

ART. ni. 

The Minister of State for Education may have any 
of the officers in his Department present at meetings of 
Councillors. 

ART. IV. 

The President of the University may request the 
presence of Professors or other members of the Univer- 
sity at meetings of Councillors, for purposes of consulta^ 
tion or advice. 

ART. V. 

For the regular transaction of business at these meet- 
ings, a quorum of at least one half of all the Councillors 



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HISTORY AND ORGANIZATION. 23^ 

is necessary. All questions sliall be settled by tlie vote 
of a simple majority of the Councillors present. 

ABT. VI. 

The business transacted at all meetings of Council- 
lors shall be recorded by a secretary, and a report of the 
same shall be forwarded by the President to the Minister 
of State for Education. 



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24 OFFICERS. 

m. UNIVERSITY OFFICERS. 



President. 
His Excellency Hiromoto Watanabe. 

Councillors. 

Professor Masakazu Toyama, BungaJcuhakushi, M.A. (Michi- 
gan University). 

Dairoku Kikuchi, Rigakuhahushi, M.A. Cantab. 
Kenji Osawa, IgakuhakiisM, M.D. (Strasburg 
University). 

Hnnzu Miyaee, IgaJcuhaJcushi. 
Eyokichi Yatabe, BigalcuhaJcushi, B. Sc. (Cornell 
University). 

Hmoji KiNOSHiTA, Hogakuhakmhiy Licencie en 
droit (Faculte de droit de Paris). 

K\zuo Hatoya]ma, Hogakuhakushi, D.C.L. (Yale 
College). 

KiNGO Tatsuno, Kogakuhakuslii, 

Kauy Fourouitsi, Kogakuhakuslii, Ingenienr des 
arts et manufactures, Licencie es sciences. 

Secretary, 
Professor Kenzo Wadagaki, Bungakushi. 

Librarian. 
Professor Inagi Tanaka, Bungakushi. 



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OFFICEES. 25 

Assistant Librarian. 
Masatake Inomata. 

Curator of the Botanic Garden, 

Professor Ry5kichi Yatabe, EigaJcuhakushi, B. Sc. (Cornell 
University). 

Director of the Tokyo Observatory. 

Professor Hisashi Teeao, Bigakuhakiishi, Licencie es sciences 
mathematiques (Faculte des sciences de 
Paris). 

Superintendents of Dormitories. 

HiKOGORo Shimizu, (for the Colleges of Law, Medicine, 

Engineering, Literature and Science). 
KuNio Arao, (for the College of Engineering). 
Naokige Yamada, (for the College of Medicine). 
Seitaro Hori, (for the College of Science). 
Masatake Inomata, (for the College of Literature). 



-^•^.— The names of CoTincillors and Superintendents are ar- 
ranged according to seniority of appointment. 



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26 GENEKAL REGULATIONS. 

IV. GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR 
THE COLLEGES. 



1. ACADEMIC YEAR, TERMS, AND 
VACATIONS. 

1. — The academic year begins on the 11th of Sep- 
tember and ends on the 10th of July. 

2. — The academic year is divided into three terms : 
the first term, comprising one hundred and five days,, 
extends from September 11th to December 24th ; the 
second term of eighty-three days extends from January 
8th to March 31st ; and the third term of ninety-four 
days extends from April 8th to July lOfch. 

3. — The Winter vacation comprises two weeks, com- 
mencing on the 25th of December and ending on the 7th 
of January ; the Spring vacation, one week, commencing 
on the 1st of April and ending on the 7th of the same 
month; and the Summer vacation, two months, com- 
mencing on the 11th of July and ending on the lOfch of 
September. 

4. — ^Lectures are suspended on Sundays and on the 
holidays mentioned in the Calendar, pages 2 and 3. 

2. CONDITIONS OF ADMISSION AND 
ATTENDANCE. 

1. — Students are admitted to the Colleges of the 
University at the beginning of each academic year. 

2. — ^Before students are admitted to any first year 
class, they must either produce a certificate of having 
completed the regular course in one of the High Middle 
Schools, or show, upon examination held at the Univer- 



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GENEEAL EEGULATIONS. 27 

sity^ the same degree of proficiency as those who have 
completed the courses of the above-named institutions, 
or of such other institution as the Minister of State for 
Education shall have recognized as furnishing an equi- 
valent course of instruction. 

3. — Candidates for admission to the 2nd or 3rd year 
classes, (or 4th years class in the Course of Medicine), 
are first examined in the subjects necessary for admission 
to a first year class, and afterwards upon the subjects 
XDursued by the class which they propose to enter, in 
order to determine whether they shall be admitted or 
not. 

4 — If a student has voluntarily left any of the 
Colleges, he may, upon application, be re-admitted without 
examination, from the beginning of the first term, to the 
grade of class in which he was when he left the College, 
in order to pursue the same course of study which he 
was previously pursuing. 

5. — If a student who has voluntarily left any of the 
Colleges make application for permission to pursue any 
other course than that which he was previously taking, 
he shall be admitted, upon complying with the conditions 
stated in articles 2 and 3. 

6. — Candidates for admission are required to present 
to the Director of the College which they propose to 
enter, a written application in accordance with the forms 
prescribed. 

7. — Candidates who undergo an entrance examination 
are required to -paj a fee of five yen to the University. 
The fee, however, shall be returned to any candidate, if he 
withdraw the application of his own accord before the 
date of examination. 



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28 GENERAL REGULATIONS. 

8.— When a student is admitted to any one of the 
Colleges, he is required to take the prescribed oath, and 
to sign his name in the College register. He must also 
find two sureties who are responsible for him in all 
matters involved in his connection with the College. 
These sureties are required to sign a declaration, to be 
I)laced in the hands of the Director, acknowledging this 
responsibility. Sureties must be male persons above 21 
years of age who j)ossess land or a house within the 
jurisdiction of the Tokyo City administration, or such 
other persons as the Director of the College may deem 
suitable and trustworthy. 

9. — If a surety dies or loses any of the necessary 
qualifications stated in Article 8, he must at once be 
rej)laced, and a new written declaration must be signed 
by his successor. 

10. — When a surety is absent from his fixed residence 
for a longer period than four weeks, he must, before his 
departure, state his intention to be absent, and provide 
a representative having j)ower of attorney. If both 
sureties be absent at the same time for a period of less 
than four weeks, a representative must be provided, and 
if their absence be longer than four weeks, a second 
representative must be also provided. 

11. — If a student, being unable, through sickness, to 
continue the course which he has previously chosen, 
desires to change the said course, he may, uj)on appli- 
cation to the Director made within one month from the 
beginning of the academic year, be permitted to select 
some other course in the same College. 

12. — A student who by reason of misconduct, idleness, 
or chronic sickness, is considered by the President unfit 



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GENEEAL KEGULATIONS. 



29^ 



to continue any longer a student of the College, receives^ 
notice of dismissal from tlie Director. 

13. — A student desirous of leaving the College, must 
present a written application to that effect signed hy 
himself and one of his sureties. 

3. SUSPENSION OF ATTENDANCE. 

1. — When a student who is suffering from sickness,. 
considers that there is no likelihood of recoyerj sufficient 
to enable him to resume his studies within the space of 
two months, he may suspend his attendance at the Col- 
lege during the current academic year, after obtaining 
permission from the Director of the College. 

2. — A student who has obtained permission to sus- 
pend his attendance at a College, shall, at the beginning 
of the following academic year, enter the class of the 
grade to which he belonged when he obtained the said 
permission. 

3. — No tuition fee is demanded of a student who has 
obtained permission to suspend his attendance at a Col- 
lege, during the period of such suspension. 

If he is in receipt of a loan or other scholarship, or- 
is a government cadet, the payment of such scholarship 
or cadetship is also susi^ended. 

If such student recover from his sickness at an 
earlier date than he expected, he may by obtaining 
special ]3ermission attend classes, but not as a regular 
student, and in this case he is required to pay his tuitioB 
fee. 

4. — When a student makes an apj)lication to the 
Director of his CoUege for permission to suspend his 
studies, the Director may grant his request if he consider 



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30 GENERAL REGULATIONS. 

it reasonable, subject to the approval of the Dii*ector of 
the first Hospital of the Medical College, to whom the 
matter must always be referred. 

5. — ^When the matter above mentioned is referred 
to him, the Director of the Hospital shall appointed a com- 
mittee to examine into the state of health of the applicant, 
and shall inform the Director of the College of the result 
of their inquiry. 

4. EXAMINATIONS AND CERTIFICATES. 

1. — The annual examination commences on June 21st 
(or 22nd if the 21st be a Sunday), when students are 
examined on all subjects studied during the year ; but 
should the intruction in any subject be completed during 
the first or second term, the examination on that subject 
may be held at the time of such completion. With regard 
to practical work carried out by students in laboratories, 
workshops, or any other place, the instructor has the 
option of deciding whether or not an annual examination 
shall be held. In the annual examination of the 4th year 
class of Medicine and the 3rd year class of Pharmacy in 
the Medical College, students are not examined on the 
subjects included in the graduation examinations. 

2. — The term marks for the work done during each 
term in each subject shall be determined by written 
examinations, essays, or exercises, or by any other means 
the instructor may prefer. If a student has given no 
means of determining his term marks, on account of 
absence duiing the whole term and at the term examina- 
tion, or from other causes, his term marks shall be 
reckoned at zero. 



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GENERAL REGULATIONS. 31 

3. — The year marks of a student in each subject at 
the end of each academic year, shall be determined by 
Mding twice the average mark for the term work to the 
marks obtained at the annual examination, and then by 
dividing the sum thus obtained by 3. 

Where any subject is studied during only one term, 
the year mark of the student in that subject shall be 
determined in the same way, the term mark being taken 
as the average mark for the term work. 

KB. — In the case of practical work done by students 
-when no annual examination is held, the average mark 
for the term work will be considered the year mark. 

4. — The general average of the student for each 
^academic year is determined by dividing the sum of the 
year marks (obtained by the method mentioned in the 
foregoing article) in all the subjects, by the number of 
the subjects. 

5. — Each professor or instructor shall report to the 
Director the term marks at the end of each term, and the 
marks for the annual examination as soon as possible after 
the date of examination. 

6. — At the end of every academic year after the final 
examinations, a list of each class is posted up, with the 
names of the students, arranged according to merit, 
shovnng also promotion or degradation. 

7. — At the end of each academic year, students are 
promoted, degraded or dismissed according to the scheme 
given on next page. Students who have failed in an 
examination, are not allowed to be re-examined under any 
circumstances. 



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32 



OEKERAL EEGULATIOKS. 



GENERAL 
AVERAGE. 


YEAR MARK. 
UNDER 60. 


DISPOSAL OF STUDENT. 


Number 

of 
subjects. 


Lowest. 


Next 
Lowest. 


6<) to 100 


None. 






Promoted. 


do. 


1. 


50 to 59 + 




do. 


do. 


1. 


to 49. 




/But it\ 
I either tennj 
1 average orl 
Degraded ; < final ex-V Promoted, 
lamination 1 
(mark is 601 
Vor over, / 


do. 


2. 


50 to 59 + 




/But if\ 
leitlier term) 
laverage orl 
ISnal ex-i 
Degraded ; <amination \ Promoted, 
jmark in| 
leitlier ofl 
Ithe two isl 
\60 or over, / 


do. 


2. 


40 to 49 + 


50 to 59 + 


/But ifv 
leitlier term 
laverage or 
Degraded X final exami-v Promoted. 
J nation mark 
fin both is 
V 60 or over, 


do. 


2. 


to 49 + 




do. 


do. 


3 or 
more. 


to 59 + 




do. 


50 to 59 + 


1 or 2. 


to 59 + 




do. 


do. 


3 or 
more. 


40 to 59 + 




do. 


do. 


do. 


to 39 + 




Dismissed. 


40 to 49 + 


1. 


to 49 + 




Degi'aded. 


do. 


2 or 
more. 


to 49 + 




Dismissed. 


to 39 + 


1 or 
more. 


to 39 + 




do. 



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GENERAL BEGULATIONS. 33 

8. — Students who are absent from the annual exami* 
nation will be degraded, but in cases where term aver- 
ages obtained during the year are such as, according to 
the foregoing scheme, entitle them to promotion, a special 
examination will be held for them at the beginning of the 
next academic year. 

9. — Students who are degraded according to Article 
7, are required to attend the same class from the first. term 
of the next year, and to pursue all the subjects studied 
by that class. They may sometimes be exempted from 
attending lectures on those subjects which are studied 
only during one year or a portion of one year, and on 
which they have passed their examinations ; but they must 
be present at all the examinations held during the year. 

10. — Any student who is degraded in two successive 
years shall be dismissed. 

11. — At the end of each academic year, each student 
of the graduating classes whose term average and final 
examination marks are such as to entitle him to promo- 
tion, according to the scheme laid down in Article 7, 
shall receive a certificate of graduation from his College^ 
in conformity with Article 3 of the Imperial Ordinance 
relating to the University. Students in the Medical Col- 
lege are required to pass a special examination for gra- 
duation."^ 

12. — The graduates of the Colleges are entitled to 
be styled as follows : — 

The graduates of the College of Law — EdgahiisM; 
the graduates of the College of Medicine — Igahushi 



*For particulars, see the special regulations for graduation 
examinations. 



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34 GENEEAL EEGULATIONS. 

(or Yakugakusld in the Course of Pharmacy) ; the 
•graduates of the College of Engineering — Kogakushi; 
the graduates of the College of Literature — Bungakashi ; 
and the graduates of the College of Science — Bigakitshi, 

Jun-Igakushi or those who graduated at the late 
Tokyo Igakko, before the degree of Igakushi was insti- 
tuted, and graduates of the late Kobu Daigakko who 
failed to obtain the degree of Kogakushi at their gradua- 
tion examinations, and who have been engaged in profes- 
sional practice since the time of graduation, can enjoy 
the privilege of styling themselves Igakushi or Kogakushi 
respectively, on obtaining the sanction of the President 
of the University. 

5. POST-GRADUATE STUDIES. 

1. — '^' course of post-graduate studies is established 
in each College, for the benefit of students of the Uni- 
versity Hall, and also for those graduates of the Colleges 
who may desire to pursue further the studies of the 
€Ourse which they have already completed. Graduates 
(not students of the University Hall) are admitted to 
this course only when circumstances allow. 

2. — Students of this course are of two classes : 
holders of scholarships and other students. 

3. — Scholarships will be allotted to students by the 
Director of each College with the sanction of the Presi- 
dent and the University Council, only in cases where the 
students take a course of study for which special en- 
couragement and assistance may be required ; and the 
College will give to each holder of a scholarship a fixed 
sum for his monthly expenses in the College, and for the 
actual expenses incurred in his scientific investigations. 



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GENERAL REGULATIONS. 35 

4. — Each holder of a scholarship will receive a sum 
Bot exceeding 15 yen per month, (for any part of a 
month according to the number of days), for his regular 
expenses in the College, and the necessary travelling 
expenses for scientific investigations, within the limit of 
the funds set apart for each student in each subject of 
study. A tuition fee is not demanded of any holder of a 
scholarship. 

5. — Students other than holders of a scholarship are 
required to i^ay a tuition fee and the actual expenses 
incurred in their own investigations, but the whole of 
such expenses including travelling expenses, or a certain 
portion of the whole, may be granted to them by the 
College when necessary, with the sanction of the Presi- 
dent and the University Council. 

G. — The length of any course of post-graduate stud- 
ies shall not be less than one year, nor greater than two 
years, but students of the University Hall may remain 
in this course longer than two years. 

7. — Students attending a course of post-graduate 
studies, who by reason of misconduct, idleness or chronic 
sickness may be considered unfit to prosecute their stud- 
ies, shall be dismissed, subject to the approval of the 
President and the University Council. 

8. — At the close of the period for post-graduate 
studies, students are required to present to the professor 
in charge, a short statement of their scholastic career 
while in the College, and a written thesis treating of 
some branch of the study which they have been pursuing ; 
and the professor in question shall forward all such 
papers to the Director of the College, accompanied by 
his remarks on the same. 



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36 GENERAL REGULATIONS. 

9. — If the Director of the College finds that the report 
made by the professor on the papers above referred to, 
is satisfactory, he shall certify the said report and give 
it to the students, and shall report his action to the 
President of the University. 

10. — No surety is required for post-graduate stu- 
dents, and they may in certain circumstances be permitted 
on application to live in the Dormitories. 

11. — Regulations for admission and payment of tuition 
fees, and all the other regulations, hold good for students 
following a course of post-graduate study, unless special 
regulations are otherwise made. 

6. ASSISTANTS. 

A. UNPAID ASSISTANTS. 

1. — Unpaid assistants are appointed in the institutes, 
laboratories, workshops and hospitals belonging to the 
Colleges. 

2. — The appointment of unpaid assistants is made at 
their own request, by the President acting under the 
advice of the University Council, from among those who 
have finished their course of study in one of the Col- 
leges, or in the University Hall. 

3. — Unj)aid assistants having the same privileges 
and duties as other assistants, are required to comply 
with all the regulations of the University. 

4. — To those who have discharged the duties of 
assistants in a satisfactory manner for a period of more 
than two years, certificates of merit will be given by the 
President acting on the request of the Director of the 
College and under the advice of the University Council. 



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GENERAL REGULATIONS. 37 

B. PAID ASSISTANTS. 

1. — The number of paid assistants is fixed for each 
institute, laboratory, workshop and hospital ; and a salary 
not exceeding 15 yen per month is paid to each assistant. 
But when special circumstances demand it, a salary ex- 
ceeding 15 yen monthly may be paid, when this payment 
is sanctioned by the President, at the request of the 
Director of the College. 

2. — Certificates of merit may be given to paid assist- 
ants in compliance with Article 4 of the regulations for 
unpaid assistants. 

7. ELECTIVE STUDIES. 

1. — Persons not regular students who wish to study 
one or more of the subjects prescribed in the courses in 
the Colleges of Law, Engineering, Literature and Science, 
may be permitted under certain conditions so to do, upon 
application, always provided that the number of regular 
students admits of this. 

2. — In the College of Medicine, graduates of any 
medical school which is recognized by the Minister of 
State for Education as giving a thorough education in 
medicine and surgery, or those who show, ux^on examina- 
tion, the same degree of proficiency as these graduates, 
are permitted to pursue elective studies, under the proviso 
mentioned in Article 1. In the Medical College, elective 
students may, under certain circumstances, be admitted by 
special permission of the President, at other times than 
the regular time for admission. 

3. — The English, French or German languages can- 
not be chosen as elective studies by students, unless a 



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38 GENERAL EEGULATIONS. 

knowledge of either of them is necessary for the study of 
the special subjects chosen by them. 

4. — Candidates for an elective course must be at least 
nineteen years of age, and except they be graduates of 
those medical schools referred to in Article 2, must 
satisfy the College examiners of their fitness to study the 
special subjects chosen by them. 

5. — A student who has voluntarily left any one of 
the Colleges, except the College of Mediciue, may, ujDon 
application, be admitted to an elective course. 

6. — Elective students must pass the examinations 
prescribed for regular students in the same subject, 
and may obtain, upon application to the Director of the 
College, certificates that they have finished their course 
in a special subject, if their term and final examination 
marks are such as would entitle regular students to pro- 
motion. 

7. — The ordinary regulations for admission, payment 
of fees, and other requirements are applicable to elective 
students, unless special regulations be made for them. 

8. — A regular student of one of the Colleges may 
choose and pursue, as an elective study, one or more 
subjects in his own course or in any other course at his 
College, when the professors of the regular and elective 
courses have certified his fitness to take such course. 

No student, however, is permitted to choose a subject 
X3rescribed for the upper classes of his regular course. 

9. — Students who have entered on the study of any 
subject are not permitted to abandon the same in favour 
of another subject, until the close of the academic year, 
or the termination of the work of the regular course in 
that subject. 



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GENERAL REGULATIONS. dU 

8. HONOUR STUDENTS. 

1. — A. stadent of any of the Colleges who is distin- 
guished for his scholastic attainments and good morals^^ 
may be made an honour student. 

2. — Honour students are nominated, upon the ap- 
I)roval of the President, by the Director of each College, 
according to the results of the annual examination at the 
end of each academic year. 

3. — Honour students enjoy the privilege of exemp- 
tion from tuition fees. 

4. — Honour students who by reason of misconduct, 
idleness, or sickness, may be considered unfit to continue 
their studies, will be deprived of this honour. 

9. LOAN SCHOLARSHIPS. 

A . REGULATIONS. 

1. — ^If a student takes a course of study in one of 
the Colleges where special assistance may be required, 
and shows himself proficient in scholastic attainments and 
of good moral character, but is unable to meet his Col- 
lege expenses from his own private means, the President 
of the University may allot to such student a College 
loan scholarship of eighty-five yen per annum during the 
academic year. 

2. — When requested by Government offices, com- 
panies, or i3rivate individuals, the President of the Uni- 
versity may allot to students loan scholarships offered 
by these offices, companies, or individuals. 

3. — Loan scholarships are given for two objects : {a) 
in order to bind students to devote themselves, after 
graduation, to certain professions or occupations desig- 
nated by the President of the University or the subscri- 



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40 GENERAL REGULATIONS. 

bers, as the case may be, for the same number of years 
as such scholarships shall have been held, and (h) in order 
to promote and encourage university education. 

4. — ^The holder of a loan scholarship is bound, after 
graduation, to return monthly the sum of money he 
received monthly while in the University, so as to com- 
plete the reimbursement of the whole sum during the 
same number of years as thafc in which he received such 
scholarship. The holder of a loan scholarship for the 
promotion of university education, must, in addition to 
the refunding of the sum of money, also pay back in- 
terest on the same at the rate of six per cent per annum, 

5. — Should the holder of a loan scholarship granted 
by a company or x^rivate individual fail, after graduation, 
to engage in the profession or occupation designated by 
the subscriber, he may, after obtaining the consent of the 
company or individual, be released from his engagement, 
by returning the sum of money received in the form of a 
scholarship, together with interest on the same at the 
rate of six per • cent pei^ annum ; the said total to be paid 
at one time wifchin thirty days after such consent has been 
obtained. 

6. — Interest payable on a loan scholarship shall be 
calculated for the number of days from the date when 
the money was actually received, up to the day of return- 
ing the same. 

7. — Comi^anies or private individuals desirous of 
offering loan scholarships, are requested to present to the 
President of the University two copies of a written decla- 
ration to that effect, and to obtain his acknowledgment for 
the same ; one of these copies shall be returned to the 
subscriber and the other shall be kept in the University. 



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GENERAL REGULATIONS. 41 

8. — Candidates for loan scholarsliips shall submit to 
the Director of each College a written application setting 
forth the object of their studies and other details. 

9. — Successful candidates for loan scholarships shall 
present to the President of the University two copies of 
a written declaration after a jDrescribed form, certifying 
their intention of fulfilling their obligations ; in the case 
of scholarships given by Government offices, companies or 
private individuals, a copy shall be sent to the subscriber, 
and the other shall be kept in the University with the 
original declaration of the subscriber. 

10. — At the request of the subscriber of any scholar- 
ship, and with the President's aj)proval, the sum to be 
paid to the holder of a scholarship may be diminished, 
and if by doing so there be a surplus in the amount sub- 
scribed, the number of scholarshix)s may be increased. 

11. — The subscribed fund and the payment of loan 
scholarships shall be intrusted to the accountant of the 
University. 

12. — If any holder of a loan scholarship be deemed 
unfit to continue so any longer, on account of misconduct, 
idleness, or sickness, he shall be dei^rived of the scholar- 
ship. 

B. — NTJxMBER OF SOHOLARSHIPS. 

For the current academic year many scholarshixDS are 
offered by the Colleges of Medicine, Literature and Science, 
by Government offices, by companies, and by private indivi- 
duals, in accordance with the regulations above mentioned. 

The Scholarships are as follows : 
1 Scholarship offered by the Medical College to a student 
of Pharmacy. 



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42 GENEBAL BEGULATIONS. 

6 Scholarsliips offered by the Literature College. 
8 ScholarsliixDS offered by the Science College. 

7 Scholarships offered by the Education Department 

to the students in the Literature and Science 
Colleges and the Politics Section of the Law- 
College, who intend to serve as teachers in Middle 
or Normal schools after graduation. 

51 Scholarships offered by the Department of Justice 
to the students in the Law Section of the Law 
College who intend to serve in that Department 
after graduation. 

12 Scholarships offered by the Railway Bureau to two 
students in Civil Engineering, who intend to serve 
in that Bureau after graduation. 

30 Scholarships offered by the Bureau of Works in the 
Home Department to the students in the course of 
Civil Engineering in the Engineering College, 
who intend to serve in the said Bureau after 
graduation. 

4 Scholarships offered by the Department of Agricul- 
ture and Commerce to two students each in 
Mechanical Engineering and Applied Chemistry 
in the College of Engineering, who intend to 
serve in that Department after graduation. 

11 ScholarshijDS offered by the Mitsubishi Company to 
such students in any class in any College as the 
President of the University may select with the 
object of promoting higher education. 

6 Scholarships offered by Mr. Ichibei Fukukawa to 
students in Mining and Metallurgy in the College 



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GENERAL REGULATIONS. 4^ 

of Engineering, with the object of fostering that 
branch of learning. 

3 Scholarships offered by the Fujita Company of Osaka 

to two students in Mining and one in Applied 
Chemistry in the Engineering College, who intend 
to serve in the said Company after graduation. 

4 Scholarships offered by the lNipx3on Doboku Kaisha to 

two students each in Civil Engineering and Archi- 
tecture in the Engineering College, who intend to 
serve in the said Company after graduation. 
1 Scholarship offered by the Tokyo Electrical Light- 
ing Company to one student in Electrical Engi- 
neering in the Engineering College, who intends, 
to serve in the said Company after graduation. 

1 Scholarship offered by the Osaka Cotton Spinning 
Company to a student in Mechanical Engineering 
in the College of Engineering, who intends to serve 
in that Company after finishing his course. 

3 Scholarships offered by. Mr. Kichizayemon Sumitomo to 
such students in the College of Engineering as 
the President of the University may select, with 
the object of fostering engineering science. 

1 Scholarship offered by the Mitsui Company (Bussan 
Kwaisha) to a student in Mining and Metallurgy in 
the College of Engineering, who intends to serve 
in that Company after graduation. 

12 Scholarships offered by Mr. Eyosaburo Hara to six 
students each in the Colleges of Literature and 
Science, whom the President of the University 
may select, with the object of promoting higher 
education. 



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44 GENEKAL EEGULATIONS. 

1 Scholarship offered bj the Osaka and Sakai Eailway 
Company to a student in Mechanical Engineeiing 
in the College of Engineering, who intends to 
serve in that Company after graduation. 

1 Scholarship offered by Dr. J. Shimoyama and other seven- 

teen graduates in pharmacy of the University to a 
student in pharmacy in the Medical College, whom 
the President of the University may select with the 
object of promoting research in that branch of 
Science. 

2 Scholarships offered by Dr. Ryokun Kondo, to two 

students, one of the 1st and one of the 2nd year 
class in the Medical College, who intend after 
graduation to serve as his assistants. 

2 Scholarships offered by Mr. Zenzieo Yasuda, to such 
students of the Engineering College as intend to 
pursue either Naval Architecture or Electrical 
Engineering. 

1 Scholarshii3 offered by Mr. Sahe Ohashi, to a student in 
the Politics Section of the College of Law, whom the 
President may select, with the object of promoting 
higher education. 

1 Scholarship offered by Mr. Kakubei Suhaea to a student 

in Mining and Metallurgy in the College of 
Engineering, who intends to serve in his office after 
graduation. ^ 

2 Scholarships offered by Mr. Iwaz5 Kajima to such 

students in the College of Engineering as the 
President of the University may select, with the 
object of fostering engineering science. 



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GENEKAL REGULATIONS. 45 

There are seven cadets in law in the College of Law, 
and twenty cadets in medicine in the College of Medicine, 
who are appointed by the President of the University, 
after consultation with the proper officers of the Army 
and at their request. These Army cadets are destined 
for judicial or medical appointments in the War Depart^ 
ment, as the case may be, and their College expenses 
are paid by the War Department. 

In the College of Engineering, there are eleven 
cadetships from the Navy Department, of which five 
are available for the class of Naval Architecture, three, for 
the special course of Mechanical Engineering for warship?, 
two, for the class of Technology of Arms, and one, for that 
of Technology of Explosives. There are also fourteen 
cadetships offered by the War Department in the class 
of Architecture. 

Cadets, however, have not yet been appointed to the 
number above stated, as students in the University willing 
to hold such cadetships are at present limited in number. 

In addition, many students have been sent to the 
different Colleges from several Ken at the expense of the 
local authorities. 

Donations in money were received by the late Tokyo 
Daigaku from Mr. Kihei Kobayashi, Dr. Chutoku Ishi- 
GUBO, and some of the officers of the Government Printing 
Office, and from the friends of the late Mr. Motogoeo 
Yenuma, an assistant of the Tokyo Daigaku, as a tribute 
to his memory : and by the Kobu Daigakko from the 
Minister of Public Works and the officers of his Depart 
ment and from the Manager of the Mitsui Bank. Some 
of these donations have already been disposed of accord- 
ing to the instructions of the several donors, while others 



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46 GENERAL REGULATIONS. 

have been transferred to a fund belonging to the present 
University. 

In the present University, Hatakeyama scholarships 
have been founded in Law and Chemistry, by the friends 
of the late Mr. Yoshinari Hatakeyama, M.A., an eminent 
Director of the Tokyo Kaisei Gakko, to whose zeal and 
exertions that institution was indebted for the establish- 
ment of the courses in Law and Chemistry and for its final 
development into the Tokyo Daigaku. 

Donations in money were also lately received from 
Mr. IcHiBEi FuRUKAWA to aid in the promotion of Mining 
and Metallurgy studies, from the friends of the late 
Professor Morisabqro Ichikawa, to found scholarships 
for the students in the First Higher Middle School, who 
are preparing for admission to the class of physics in 
the College of Science; from Dr. Seiken Takenaka towards 
the fund of the hospital of the Medical College; and from 
the Association of Popular Lectures in German in aid 
of students suffering from illness who have no sufficient 
means. An annual donation for life of a certain sum of 
money was offered by Mr. Akira Watanabe and accepted. 

10. SCIENTIFIC EXCURSIONS. 

In any case where a student in any one of the 
Colleges, or a student following a post-graduate course, 
may have to undertake a scientific excursion, the Director 
of the College shall order him to undertake the same, 
after the approval of the President has been obtained, and 
shall allow him his travelling expenses according to a 
fixed rate, within the limit of the funds set apart for each 
student in the different courses, as prescribed in the 
following page. 



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GENERAL REGULATIONS. 47 

LIMIT OF ALLOWANCES SET APART BY THE 

UNIVERSITY FOR EACH STUDENT IN 

THE DIFFERENT COURSES. 



in the post-graduate in the regular courses, 
courses. (To be paid (To be paid in 

Course. in 2 years.) 2nd & 3ra year.)* 

Yen. Yen. 

1. Law 50. — 

2. Pathology 50. — 

3. Pharmacology 50. — 

4. Hygiene 50. — 

5. Civil Engineering . . . 180. 120. 

6. Mechanical „ . . 150. 100. 

7. Naval Architecture . . 150. 100. 

8. Electrical Engineering 100. 60. 

9. Architecture 100. 60. 

10. Applied Chemistry . . 90. 60. 

11. Mining & Metallurgy 180. 120. 

12. Literature 50. — 

13. Physics 50. — 

14. Theoretical Chemistry 35. 35. 

15. Geology.. 108. 72. 

16. Biology 90. 60. 

11. FEES AND OTHER EXPENSES. 

The regulations established for tuition fees are as 
fallows : — 

1.— The tuition fee demanded of each student both 
regular and elective, in the five Colleges, is two yen and 
fifty sen per month, which sum must be paid monthly, 

*These allowances may be paid during the 1st year or in certain 
cases. 



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48 GENEB-\L EEGULATIONS. 

from the month of his entrance to the month of his gra- 
duation, departure or dismissal, inclusive. A student 
may pay in advance at one time the tuition fee for several 
months; but in such cases, if the student should happen 
in the meantime to leave his College owing to some 
emergency the fee paid in advance will be returned to him. 

2. — No tuition fee is required for the months of the 
summer vacation, viz. July and August, nor for any 
month during the whole of which the College to which 
the student belongs happens to be closed. 

3. — A student who on account of illness or other 
similar cause is absent from his College during any 
entire month, is still required to pay the regular tuition 
fee for that month. 

4. — The tuition fee shall be paid to the accountant 
of the University on a fixed day in each month ; but in 
cases where a student may have entered the College after 
such fixed day in any month, the fee for that month shall 
be paid on the fixed day in the following month. 

5. — The necessary expenses of any one student oi any 
College, who resides in the Dormitories or in the au- 
thorised boarding-houses, including the tuition fee, the 
cost of living, fire and light, will vary from a maximum 
of twelve yen to a minimum of seven yen and fifty sen 
per month, according to the scale of living he may chose 
to adopt. 



12. REPAYMENT OF LOAN SCHOLARSHIPS. 

In case any holder of a loan scholarship is deprived 
of his scholarship, or is expelled from the University, on 
account of misconduct or idleness ; or in case, he, for 



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GENERAL EEGULATIONS. 49 

reasons of his own, wishes to return the scholarship, or 
to retire from the University, he must repay the money he 
has received, at once. 

Such students are not released from the obligations, 
into which they entered by their written declaration. 

13. RESIDP]NCE AND DISCIPLINE OF STUDENTS. 

All students of the Colleges, not elective students, 
must live in the Dormitories within the compounds of 
the University, or, (owing to the want of a sufficient 
number of rooms to meet the requirements of all the 
students), in the authorised boarding houses, which are 
situated within a radius of about ten cho from the Uni- 
versity. Students, however, may live in their houses 
or in a professor's house under the supervision of their 
parents or elder brothers or the professor in whose 
house they live, by permission obtained from the proper 
officer of the University. 

As to residence and discipline, all students are 
under the care of the Superintendents of Dormitories, 
who are careful to see that the regulations established 
by the President of the University are observed, and 
who issue from time to time minor regulations and 
notices for the guidance of students. 

All inquiries, applications, and complaints regarding 
matters connected with the residence of students, should 
be addressed to the Superintendents. 

Students are permitted to wear no other dress than 
the College uniform, and must wear it in a decent and 
orderly manner; as a general rule, the winter suit is worn 
from the 1st of November to the 31st of May, and the 
summer suit from the 1st of June to the 31st of October. 



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50 GENERAL REGULATIOJsS. 

Regularity of hours, observance of rules, and general 
^oocl conduct are required as a condition for residence in 
the Dormitories as well as in the authorised boarding 
liouses. 

The folloAving is an abstract of the regulations for 
Dormitories issued by the President of the University : — 

The students who live in the Dormitories are limit- 
ed in number for the present, and receive notice from the 
Superintendent when they must enter, generally at the 
l3eginning of each academic year. But it is permissible 
for those students who have received, from the Superin- 
tendent, notice to enter the Dormitories, or are expected 
to live in the authorised boarding houses, to live in their 
own houses or in a professor's house, if they so desire, 
^excepting all holders of scholarships and all cadets, who 
must, in every case, enter the Dormitories, when they 
have received due notice. 

Students who enter or leave the Dormitories are 
required to sign their names in the Dormitory register. 

The sureties of a student who have signed the re- 
quired declaration at the time of his admission to his 
•College, are responsible in all matters connected with 
his residence in the Dormitory. 

Students are required to keej) their rooms clean and 
tidy. 

Students are forbidden to bring into the Dormitories 
or keep therein, any intoxicating liquor, or any article 
l^rejudicial to good order and decency, or to smoke 
tobacco in their bed-rooms. 

Students are forbidden to receive any visitor except 
in the rooms set apart for that purpose. 



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GENERAL REGULATIONS. 51 

Sfcadents may, when they have finished their daily 
ivork at the Colleges, go outside of the University gates on 
private business, until 8 o'clock p.m. according to the 
season of the year, or until 10 o'clock on the night before 
any holiday. On holidays, students are at liberty to go 
outside of the gates from morning until the hour fixed for 
returning to the Dormitory. 

A student who is prevented by illness from attend- 
ing College, is not allowed to go outside of the University 
gates, excex3t by s^Decial permission from the Medical 
Officer. 

Any Student, who is desirous of leaving his Dormitory, 
•or of staying out for a night, on account of urgent busi- 
ness, must in person obtain leave from the SuiDcrintendent, 
stating his reasons. 

A student who has gone outside of the University gates 
and returns to the Dormitory later than the appointed 
hour, must bring with him a note from one of his sureties, 
explaining the reason of the delay, and must submit the 
same to the Superintendent ; and no student is allowed to 
€nter the University gates after 11 o'clock p.m., at which 
hour they are shut. 

A student who is obliged to stay out a whole night 
by reason of urgent business or sudden illness, must 
submit to the Superintendent, before 10 o'clock of the 
next morning, a certificate from one of his sureties stating 
the fact, even when he is unable to return in person to the 
Dormitory on that morning. 

A student suffering from a slight attack of illness 
may receive medical attendance in the Dormitory, and 
may remain in his own room for one week, but in cases 
where his sickness is of a serious nature or is infectious 



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52 GENERAL EEGULATIONS. 

or contagious, or where recovery has not taken place 
•within one week, he shall be removed to any place desig- 
nated by him, if he desires it, or to the Hospital belonging 
to the College of Medicine. 

A student suffering from illness is not permitted to 
take meals in his room, without permission from the super- 
intendent, acting under advice from the Medical Officer. 

Any student failing to observe the regulations and 
notices issued from time to time, or who is guilty of 
misconduct, shall be liable to the proper punishment or to 
dismissal, as the nature of his case requires. 

14. EECREATION AND PHYSICAL EXERCISES. 

An enclosure has been set apart in the centre of the 
University grounds at Hongo, for the purposes of recrea- 
tion, and is now provided with all the requisites for 
outdoor sports. The University boat-house stands on the 
east bank of the Eiver Sumida, at Mukojima. Its upper 
floor, commanding an extensive view of the river, is 
specially arranged for the accommodation of visitors at 
the annual regattas. 

The Teikohu Daigakii TJnddkwai or University Exer- 
cise Club, organized under the patronage of the iDresent 
President of the University, who is ex-officio President of 
the Club, receives an annual grant-in-aid from the Univer- 
sity. Its current expenses are met by the subscriptions 
of its members, and of professors and others of the Uni- 
versity staff who are not members. Professors and all 
other members of the University staff, and graduates and 
students of the University Hall and the five Colleges 
are eligible for membershiiD in the Club. 



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GENEEAL EBGULATIONS. 53 

The club holds two large annual gatherings, one in 
the University gounds for athletic sports and other 
physical exercises in the autumn, and one for a regatta 
on the Eiver Sumida in the spring. 

During the summer vacation, students are trained in 
swimming, under the superintendence of a competent 
teacher, in the Eiver Sumida below the Eyogoku Bridge. 

Arrangements have been made for rooms, in the 
building adjoining the Dormitories, suitable for the holding 
of meetings by the various scientific, literary and musical 
societies. 



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64 COLLEGE OF LAW. 

V. COLLEGE OP LAW. 

1. OFFICERS. 



DIRECTOR. 

His Excellency Hiromoto Watanabe, President of the 
University. 

CHIEF-PROFESSOR. 

Professor Kazuo Hatoyama, EdgaJcuhakushi, D.C.L. (Yale 
College). 



PROFESSORS. 

*NoBusHiGE HozuMi, HogakuhoJcusMj Barrister-at-Law 

(Middle Temple) Jurisprudence, Roman Law and 

English Criminal Law, 

Karl Rathgen, Dr. R. P. (Strasburg University) 

Fuhlic Law, Administrative Science and Statistics. 

HiROJi KiNOSHiTA, EdgahulmhusM, Licencie en droit (Faculte 
de droit de Paris) French Civil Law, 

Masaakira Tomh, Edgakuhakushi, Doctenr en droit, Laureat 

des Concours de la Faculte de Lyon 

Criminal Law and French Civil Law. 

Kenzo Wadagaki, Bungahushi Political Economy 

and Eistory of Political Economy. 

* The names of professors, assistant-professors, lecturers and 
assistants are arranged according to seniority of appointment. 



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COLLEGE OE LA.W. 



55^ 



Heineich Weipert, Doctor Juris (Jena University),. 

Barrister-at-Law (Cassel) • 

Roman Lav: and Civil Procedure.. 

Seiichi Sueoka, BungakusM. Administrative Sciencey 

Fublic International Law and Politics, 

Uda EaGERT, Doctor Philos., Professor (der Staats- 
wissenschaften) of G5ttingen University 

Finance and Political Economy, 

Kazuo Hatoyama, Hogakuliahushi, D.C.L. (Yale College). . . . 
Public and Private International Laiv. 

MiCHisABUEO MiYAZAKi, HogaJcusJii, 

Roman Law and German Language. 

HippoLYTE AuGusTiN RevilliocI, Doctenr en Droit de. la 

Faculfce de Grenoble (France) 

French and Civil Law. 

Alexander Tison, M. A., L L. B. (Harvard University) 

English Law, 

Yatsuka H0ZUMI5 Bungahushi 

Public Law and Constitution, 

ASSISTANT-PEOEESSORS. 

t Yastjshi Hijikata, HogaJcushi English Law, 

Keijiro Okano, HogaJcushi English Law, 

LECTUEERS. 

Teruhiko Okamura, Eogakuhahushi, Barrister-at-Law (Mid- 
dle Temple) 

Civil Procedure and Evidence. 



f Absent. 

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66 COLLEGE OF LAW. 

ToRU Tekao, Horitsugakushi Criminal Procedure, 

Inajir5 Tajiei, Edgakuhakushij B.A. (Yale College) 

Finance. 

Kanekichi Okayama, Hdgdkushi 

Fractical Exercises in Civil and Criminal Pleadings. 



II. COUKSES OF INSTEUCTION. 

The following two courses, each of which extends 
over three years, have been established in this College, 
the course of Law being divided into three divisions. 
C First Division. 

1. Law -< Second Division. 

( Third Division. 

2. Politics. 

1.— LAW. 

FIRST DIVISION. 
FiBST Yeae. 

Hrs. per week. 
1st Term. 2nd Term. Srd Term. 

Contract 5 5 4 

Tort 1 1 1 

Eoman Law 3 3 3 

Agency — — 3 

English Criminal Law 2 2 2 

Criminal Law 2 2 2 

Civil Procedure 1 1 1 

French (optional) 3 3 3 

Practical Exercises in Civil and 

Criminal Pleadings 2 2 2 



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college of law. 57 
Second Yeak. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Negotiable Instruments 3 — — 

Bailments 2 — — 

Sales 2 2 2 

Maritime Law — 2 2 

Corporations — 3 — 

Keal Property 2 2 2 

English Constitution 2 2 2 

Criminal Procedure 2 2 2 

French (optional) 3 3 3 

Practical Exercises in Civil and 

Criminal Pleadings 2 2 2 

Thibd Year. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Insurance 1 1 1 

Equity 2 2 2 

Evidence 2 2 2 

Jurisprudence 3 3 3 

(Japanese Administrative Law ... 2 2 2 

Private International Law 1 1 1 

Public International Law (optional) 111 
Practical Exercises in Civil and 

Criminal Pleadings 2 2 2 

SECOND DIVISION. 
First Year. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Civil Law 7 7 7 

Criminal Law 2 2 2 

Koman Law 3 3 3 



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58 .COLLEGE OF LAW. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

English (optional) 3 3 3 

Practical Exercises in Civil and 

Criminal Pleadings 2 2 2 

Second Year, 

Hrs. per we6l£. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Civil Law 5 5 5 

Commercial Law 3 3 3 

Civil Procedure 1 1 1 

Evidence - 2 2 2 

Criminal Procedure 2 2 2 

English (optional) 2 2 2 

Practical Exercises in Civil and 

Criminal Pleadings 2 2 2 

Third Year. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2udTenn. 3rd Term. 

Civil Law 6 6 6 

Public International Law 1 1 1 

Jurisprudence 3 3 3 

JajDanese Administrative Law . . 2 2 2 

English Constitution 2 2 2 

English (optional) 2 2 2 

Practical Exercises in Civil and 

Criminal Pleadings 2 2 2 

THIRD DIVISION. 



First Year. 

Koman Law 

Seminar}^ Exercises in Eoman 
Law 



Hrs. per week. 
1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 



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COIXEGE OF LAW. 



59' 



Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2iid Term. 3rd Term.. 

Criminal Law 2 2 2 

Political Economy 3 3 3 

English (optional) 3 3 3 

Practical Exercises in Civil and 

Criminal Pleadings ...... 2 2 2 

Second Yeak. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term.. 

Civil Law '.',.... 2 2 2 

Commercial Law 3 3 3 

Seminary Exercises in Eoman 

Law 1 1 1 

Criminal Procedure 2 2 2 

Public International Law 2 2 2 

Japanese Administrative Law . . 2 2 2 

Political Economy 2 2 2 

English 2 '^ 2 2 

Practical Exercises in Civil and 

Criminal Pleadings 2 2 2 

Third Year. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2iid Term. 3rd Term.; 

Commercial Law , 2 2 2 

Civil Procedure 3 3 3 

Public Law , 4 4 4 

Jurisprudence 3 3 3 

Political Economy 2 2 2 

English 3 3 3 

Practical Exercises in Civil and 

Criminal Pleadings 2 2 2 



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€0 



COLLEGE OF LAW. 



2.— POLITICS. 

First Year. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

€ontract 3 3 3 

Tort 1 1 1 

Criminal Law 2 2 2 

Political Economy 3 3 3 

English Constitution 2 2 2 

Statistics 1 1 1 

German (reading) 2 2 2 

German 2 2 2 

Prench (optional) 3 3 3 

Second Year. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Civil Procedure 1 1" 1 

€ivil Law 3 3 3 

Histor}'- of Political Economy ... 2 2 2 
Public Law and Administrative 

Science 5 5 5 

Political Economy and Finance .4 4 4 
Seminary Exercises in Political 

Economy 2 2 2 

Statistics 1 1 1 

German (reading) 2 2 2 

French (optional) 2 2 2 

TmRD Year. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

History of Political Economy ... 2 2 2 

€ivilLaw 2 2 2 



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COLLEGE OF LAW. 61 



Hrs. per week. 
1st Term. 2iid Term. 3rd Term* 



Administrative Science 4 4 4 

Japanese Administrative Law 2 2 2 

Political Economy and Finance .4 4 4 
Seminary Exercises in Political 

Economy 2 2 2 

*Public International Law 1 1 1 

*Finance 2 2 2 

German (ojDtional) 2 2 2 

French (optional) 2 2 2 

*Either of the Courses to be selected. 



1. Lectures are given on the laws and customs of 
this country connected with the above subjects, where 
such now exist. In addition, English Laws are studied 
in the First Division, French Laws in the Second Division, 
and German Laws in the Third Division of the Section 
of Law. 

2. Students who wish to pursue a course of optional 
subjects are required to obtain permission from the 
Director of the College. 

3. Students who have duly obtained permission to 
pursue an optional course are required to undergo the 
prescribed examinations. To such as have successfully 
passed these examinations, certificates will be awarded 
by the President of the University. 



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^2 COLLEGE OF MEDICI^^E. 

VI. COLLEGE OP MEDICINE. 
I. OFFICEES. 



DIRECTOE. 

Professor Hiidzu Miyake, IgakuhalcushL 

CHIEF-PROFESSOR. 

Professor Kenji Osawa, IgakuhaJcusM, M: D. (Strasburg 
University). 

PROFESSORS. 

Hhdzu Miyake, Igahuhahushi Medical History. 

Erwin Baelz, M. D. (LeiiDsic University) 

Medicine and Clinical Medicine. 

Julius Scriba, M. D. (Heidelberg University) 

Surgery and Clinical Surgery, 

Kazuyoshi Taguchi, Igahuhahushi Anatomy. 

Kenji Osawa, Igahuhahushi, M. D. (Strasburg University) . . 

Physiology. 

-fHoGARA Uno, Igahushi Surgery. 

Masakichi Sasaki, Igahuhahushi . •. Medicine. 

Masanori Ogata, Igahuhahushi Hygiene. 

Yoshikiyo Koganei, Igahuhahushi .... Anatomy and Histology. 

Djuntaro Takahashi, Igahushi .Pharmacology. 

Hazime Sakaki, Igahushi Psychiatry. 

MoRiJi MiuRA, Igahushi, M. T>. (Berlin University) 

General Pathology and Pathological Anatomy. 

t Absent. 

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COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 63 

Junichiro Shimoyama, Seiyakushi, Ph. D. (Strasburg Uni- 
versity) Pharmacy, 

Keizo Tamba, Seiyahushi, Ph. D. (Eiiangen University) . . . 

Pharmacy, 
Tanemitz Aoyama, Jgakushi. .Medicine and Clinical Medicine, 

Sankichi Sat5, Igahushi Surgery and Clinical Surgery, 

Gentatsu HamadAj Igahushi Gynecology and Obstetrics, 

KuNiYOSHi Katayama, IgatusM Medical Jurisprudence, 

Djujiro Komoto, Jgakushi Ophthalmology and Clinical 

Ophthalogy, 

ASSISTANT-PKOFESSOKS. ^ 

TsuKANu Imada Anatomy. 

ToKicHiRd NiWA, Seiyakushi Pharmacy, 

JoGORO IsE, Jgakushi Medicine, 

Tasuku Kono, Jgakushi Ophthalmology, 

Jmo TsuBoi, Igakushi Hygiene, 

LECTUEEK. 

Ch5 Hirota, Igakushi Paediatrics, 

ASSISTANTS. 

EuMiTANE Takagi, Jgukushi Surgery. 

Takuzo Yanagi, Jgakushi Gynecology and Obstetrics. 

Naganori Majima, Jgakushi Medicine. 

Ren Hori, Jgakushi Medicine, 

KiCHiNDo InokOj Igakushi Pharmacology. 

Shunichi Shimamura, Jgakushi Psychiatry. 

Gakutaro Osawa, Jgakushi Anatomy. 

Nenjiro Chiba, Igakushi Gynecology and Obstetrics. 

Taijo Kono, Igakushi Surgery. 

Shizuo Yema, Igakushi Medicine. 

KioiCHiRO Kajita, Igakushi Physiology, 

TEncHiRd Tada, Igakushi ^ Medicine. 



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64 COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 

Katsusabubo Yamagiwa, Igakushi Pathology. 

Kamejiro Issi, Igakushi Oynaesology and Obstetrics. 

YosHiNORi Tashiko, IgahusM Surgery. 

Senjie5 Inouye, Igakushi Medicine. 

MiTsuoKi Kasahara, Igakushi, Medicine. 

Yanamatsu Okamoto, Igakushi Medical Jurisprudence. 

IwAJiRO Yamada, Igakushi Surgery. 

Gakusabttro Tada, Igakushi Medicine. 

BuNJi Watanabe, Igakushi OjMhalmology. 

Tsunejir5 Kondo, Igakushi Paediatrics. 

MiCHio FujiwARA, Igakushi Ophthalmology. 

Matakishi Masaki, Igakushi Surgery. 

Tatsukichi Irizawa, Igakushi Medicine. 

Koan Ota, Igakushi Surgery. 

SuYETADA Takesaki, Pttthology. 

JuNJiRO Sakaki Gynecology and Obstetrics. 

KoMiN Tanabe Psychiatry. 



OFFICE OF THE HOSPITAL. 
ACTING-DIRECTOH. 

f Professor Hogara Uno, Igakushi. 



n. COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

The courses established in this College are as follows: — 

1. Medicine. 

2. Pharmacy. 

The course of Medicine extends over four years and is divided 
into four classes. The course of Pharmacy extends over three years 
and is divided into three classes. 



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COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 



65 



MEDICINE. 

FiEST Yeak. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Anatomy 6 6 6 

Anatomy (practical) 6 12 — 

Histology 2 2 — 

Histology (practical) — — 7 

Physiology 6 6 6 

General Pathology — \^ — 5 

Medical History — — 1 

SECOND Yeae. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term.. 

Anatomy (practical) 6 — — 

Pharmacology 3 3 — 

Materia Medica — 2 — 

Pathological Anatomy and De- 
monstrations (practical) 1 — — 

Pathological Anatomy 5 5 — 

Pathological Histology (practi- 
cal) — 2 2 

Diagnosis — 3 3 

Clinical Medicine, (optional) .. .. — — 3 

General Surgery 3 3 — 

Clinical Surgery (optional) .... — — 6 

Bandaging — — 3 

Gynecology and Obstetrics . .^..,. — — 3 

Ophthalmology — — 2 

Medical History ^. 1 1 

Special Medicine — — S 

Special Surgery — • — 2 



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66 COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 

Third Year. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Topographical Anatomy 2 2 — 

Special Medicine -... 3 3 3 

Clinical Medicine 3 3 3 

Out-patient Dispensary (medi- 
cal) 6 6 6 

Special Surgery 2 -2 2 

Clinical Surgery 6 6 G 

Out-patient Dispensary (surgi- 
cal) 3 3 3 

Obstetrics 3 — — 

Practice on the Mannikin 

(phantom) — 2 — 

Ophthalmology 1 — 2 

Clinical Ophthalmology ..* — 3 3 

Dermatology and Syphilis 3 — — 

CJlinical Gynecology and Ob- 
stetrics ' — — 3 

Hygiene — — 2 

Fourth Yeab, 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Special Medicine 3 3 — 

Clinical Medicine 3 3 3 

Out-patient Dispensary (medical). 6 6 6 

Special Surgery 2 2 — 

Clinical Surgery 6 6 6 

Out-patient Dispensary {surgi- 
cal) '.%.... 3 3 3 

Demonstrations in Surgery 

(practical) -. — — 3 



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COLLEGE OP MEDICINE. 67 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Clinical Gynecology and Ob- ! 

stetrics 3 3 3 

Ophthalmology 1 — — .. 

Clinical Ophthalmology and Ex- 
ercises on Ophthalmoscope ... — 3 3 

Clinical Psychiatry 2 2 — 

Hygiene 2 — — 

Forensic Medicine — — 3 



PHAEMACY. 

FiiisT Ye.ie. • 

* • Hrs. per week.. ; 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry 5 5 — 

Botanical Anatomy 2 — — 

Medicinal Botany — — 3 

Botany (practical) — — 5 

Dispensing 3 — — 

Dispensing (practical) 12 — — 

Organic Chemistry — 2 3 

Practice in the Japanese Phar- 
macopoeia — 18 18 

Second Year. 

Hrs. per week. 
1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Dispensing (practical) 6 — 6 

Botany (practical) — — 5 

Practice in the Japanese Phar- 
macopoeia 18 — — 

Pharmacognosy 3 4 — 

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68 COLLEOE OF MEDICINE. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Microscopy — 5 — 

Forensic Chemistry 2 ... 2 — 

Pharmaceutical Preparations ... — 18 18 

Sanitary Chemistry — — S 

Thibd Yeae. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term* 

Dispensing (practical) — 6 — 

Practice of Microscope in 

Pharmacy 5 — — 

Forensic Chemistry (practical) . . 8 8 — 
Pharmaceutical Preparations 

(practical) 18 18 — 

Sanitary Chemistry (practical) . . — — 12 

Analysis of Medicinal Plants — — 12 

Laws affecting Apothecaries .... — — 1 



The final examinations for those who have finished 
the prescribed courses in Medicino and Pharmacy will be 
held during a period lasting from the 11th of September 
to the 31st of March. 

Begulations for the final examinations in Medicine 
are given below. Those for Pharmacy have not yet been 
established, as this course has only recently been 
instituted. 

REGULATIONS FOR FINAL EXAMINATIONS. 
Art 1. The Final Examinations for students of the 
graduating class in the course of Medicine in the 
College of Medicine shall be held in accordance 
with the following regulations : — 



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college op medicine. 69 

Examining. Committee, 
Art. 2. Examining Committees shall be appointed from 
amongst the professors of the College. 

Examination Term. 
Art. 3. The Final Examinations shall begin in the 
month of September in each year, and end in the 
following March, and candidates for examination 
shall send in their applications to the Director of 
the College, not later than the last day of August. 
The days for examination on each subject shall 
be announced previously. 

Subjects of Examination. 

Art. 4. The subjects of examination shall be divided 
into three sections : — 

L Anatomical and Physiological. 

II. Surgical and Ophthalmological. 

III. Medical and Obstetrical. 

Candidates are required to undergo examina- 
tions in the order of the sections as above 
mentioned. 

Art. 5. Section I. — ^The Anatomical and Physiological 
Examinations are divided into three parts : — 

A, Anatomy. 

B. Physiology. 
(7. Pathology. 

The examinations in this section continue for 
a period of three working days, Sundays and holi- 
days being excepted, and this period is divided 
into four terms. The first two terms are devoted 
to Anatomy and the last two to Physiology and 



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70 COLLEaE OF IMEDICINE. 

• Pathological Anatomy. In each term, not more 

than eight candidates are examined at one time. 
A. — Anatomy. 

( a.) In the first term, each candidate must take 
up certain questions on Osteology and Spranch- 
nology which fall to him by lot, and give full 
explanations of the specimens laid before him. 

The Examining Committee shall select from 12 
to 15 questions on these subjects, at the beginning 
of the term in each year. 

(&.) In the second term, each candidate must 
take up certain questions on Histology which fall 
to him by lot, and answer such questions, using 
the microscope to explain the specimens laid be- 
fore him. 

The Examining Committee shall select from 10 
to 12 questions on this subject at the beginning 
of the term in each year. 
B, — Physiology. 

In the examination in Physiology, each candi- 
date is required to answer the questions which 
have fallen to him by lot. 

The Examining Committee shall select about 20 
questions on this subject at the beginning of the 
term in each year. 
C—rPathological Anatomy. 

(a.) Each candidate is examined in the practical 
autopsy of at least one cavity and is required to 
give explanations of some specimens, making use if 
necessary of the microscope. 

( &.) Each candidate shall take up some ques- 
tions on Pathology and Pathological Anatomy 



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COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 71 

assigned to him by lot, and give answers to tliein 
with full explanations. 

The Examining Committee shall select 15 ques- 
tions on these subjects at the beginning of the 
term in each year. 

Certificates in terms of the following schedule 
shall be given by the Examining Committee to 
candidates who have passed successfully the ex- 
aminations in Anatomy and Physiology. 

Schedule- 
To ifr. of 

horn on day, .... month, year. 

This is to certify that the said Mr, has 

passed the final examinations in Anatomy and Physiology 

held for days, from to 

loith the folloioing result. 

Marks. 

Osteology and Spranchnology 

Histology 

Physiology 

Pathological Anatomy 

The whole result 



(Signed) 



ExAivnNiNG Committee. 

College of Medicine. 
Date. 

N,B. — Any one who has obtained this certificate 
shall immediately report himself to the Director of 



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72 CJOLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 

the College and present the certificate to the 
Examining Committee of the section next in order, 
within three days from the date of this certificate; 
and he must be ready to undergo examinations in 
the following section after one week has elapsed 
from the completion of the examinations in the 
previous section, unless some occurrence intervenes 
of a nature serious enough to justify his absence. 

Any candidate who fails to comply with this 
regulation shall not be allowed to enter for further 
examinations during the same academic year. 
Art. 6. Section 11. — ^The Surgical and Ophthalmological 
Examinations are divided into three i)arts: — 

A. Surgery. 

B. Oi^hthalmology. 

C. Pharmacology. 

The examinations in this section continue for 
a period of twelve working days, Sundays and 
holidays being excepted, which period is divided 
into four terms. The first two terms are devoted 
to Surgery and the last two to Ophthalmology 
and Pharmacology. In each term not more than 
four candidates are examined at one time. 
A. — The examinations in Surgery are (a) Clinical and 
(6) Theoretical. 

(a.) In the clinical examinations, each candidate 
is required to treat one or two patients during a 
period of one week. During the first and second 
days of the examination term, each candidate shall 
examine one of the surgical cases in the wards, 
and give explanations before the Examining 
Committee regarding its cause, diagnosis, prog- 



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COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 73 

nosis and treatment, and he shall record these 
explanations in a journal for i3resentafcion on the 
following morning. During the succeeding six 
days, he is required to attend the patient in his 
charge in company with the Examining Committee, 
and describe in a journal the details of the patient's 
case. At the close of one week from the beginning 
of the examination term, he must present to the 
Committee a complete clinical journal, accompanied 
by his own epicrisis on the same. 

During the whole term of examination, candi- 
dates are also required to attend all the clinical 
lectures held by one of the examiners, and to 
accompany him in his visits to the wards. This 
will afford the Examining Committee frequent 
opportunities of testing the efficiency of candidates, 
as each candidate is liable to be called upon by them 
to examine any of the surgical cases in the wards. 

(6.) A theoretical examination shall be held in 
the same week as the clinical examination, the term 
for it being specially fixed. Each candidate must 
answer one question, assigned to him by lot, on 
general, and another question on s^^ecial, surgery. 
The Examining Committee shall select 24 ques- 
tions each on clinical and theoretical surgery, at 
the beginniug of the term in each year. 
B, — Ophthalmology. 

Candidates will be examined on some ophthal- 
mological cases. 
<7. — Pharmacology. 

Candidates are required to answer the questions 
allotted to them and to write a few j)rescriptions. 



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74 COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 

Tlie Examining Committee shall select 25 ques- 
tions on this subject at the beginning of the term 
in each year. 

Certificates in terms of the following schedule 
shall be given by the Examining Committee to 
candidates who have passed successfully the ex- 
aminations in Surgery and Ophthalmology. 

Schedule. 

To Mr of 

horn on day, .... month, .... year. 

This is to certify that the said Mr has 

passed the final examinations in Surgery and Ophthal- 
mology held for days, from to 

ivith the following result. 

Marks. 

Clinical Surgery 

Theoretical Surgery 

Oi^hthalmology 

Pharmacology 

The whole result 

(Signed) 



Examining Committee. 
College of Medicine. 
Date. 

KB, — See the terms of schedule contained in the 
foregoing Article. 



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COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 75 

Art. 7. Section III. — ^The Medical and Obstetrical Ex- 
aminations are divided into two parts : — 

A, Internal Medicine. 

B, Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

The examinations in this section continue dur- 
ing a period of ten working days, Sundays and 
holidays being excepted, which period is divided 
into four terms. The first two terms are devoted 
to Medicine and the last two to Obstetrics and 
Gynecology. 

In each term, not more than four candidates are 
examined at one time. 
A. — The examinations in Internal Medicine are divided 
into {a) Clinical and (6) Theoretical. 

(a.) In the Clinical examination, candidates are 
required to treat one or two patients during a period 
of one week On the first and second days of the 
examination term, each candidate shall examine one 
medical case, and offer explanations of its cause, 
diagnosis, prognosis and treatment, in presence 
of the Examining Committee, and he shall record 
these explanations in a journal for presentation 
on the following morning. During the succeeding 
six days, he shall attend the patient in his charge, 
in company with the Examining Committee, 
and describe the details of the patient's case 
in his journal. At the close of one week from the 
beginning of the examination term, he must 
present to the Committee a complete clinical 
journal accompanied by his own epicrisis on the 
same. 



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76 COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 

During tlie whole examination term, candidates 
are required to attend all the clinical lectures held 
by one of the examiners, and to accompany him in 
his visits to the wards. This will afford the Exam- 
ining Committee frequent opportunities of testing 
the efficiency of candidates, as each candidate is 
liable to be called upon by them to examine any of 
the medical cases in the wards. 

( b.) The theoretical examination shall be held in 
the same week as the clinical examination, the time 
for it being specially arranged, and each candidate 
is required to answer the questions on special 
pathology which have fallen to him by lot. 

The Examining Committee shall select from 25 
to 30 questions on this subject at the beginning of 
the term in each year. 

B, — The examination in Obstetrics and Gynecology 
is principally of a clinical nature. Candidates 
are examined in cases of confinement, the labour- 
ing or puerperal state, or in some gynecological 
cases and on the obstetrical phantom. Candidates 
may be required to answer the questions on the 
theory of these subjects which have fallen to 
them. 

The Examining Committee shall select 15 ques- 
tions on these subjects at the beginning of the term 
in each year. 

Certificates in terms of the following schedule 
«hall be given by the Examining Committee to 
candidates who have successfully passed the ex- 
aminations in Medicine and Obstetrics. . 



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COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 77 

Schedule. 

2o Mr.,. of.. 

horn on day, month, .year. 

This is to certify that the said Mr has 

passed the final examinations in Medicine and Obstetrics 

held for days, from to , with 

the following result. 

Marks. 

Clinical Medicine ' 

Theoretical Medicine 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 

The whole result 

(Signed) 



Examining Committee. 
College of Medicine. 
Date. 

N.B. — Those who have successfully passed the 
examinations shall present to the Director of the 
College the certificates given by the Committee. 

RESULTS OF EXAMINATIONS. 

Art. 8. The results of examinations both clinical and 
theoretical in each subject shall be marked as 
follows, according to the degree of efficiency : — 
excellent, very good, good, tolerable, and had. 

Art. 9. The result of an examination in one section shall 
be determined by the marks obtained for each part 
of that section, in the following manner : — 



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t8 



COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 



The mark excellent has the value 5 ; very goody 
the value 4; goody 3 ; tolerable, 2 ; and had, 1. In 
cases of I'e-examination in any one section, no 
higher mark than " good=S '' shall be given. 
Art.' '10. The whole result of the final examination 
shall be determined by the results of the three 
sections, viz : A. — Anatomical and Physiological, 
B. — Surgical and Ophthalmological, and (7. — 
Medical, and Obstetrical. The mark ''excellent= 
5" for the whole results of a final examination, 
shall be given only to the candidate who has 
obtained the mark "very groot?=4:"* for all sections 
and for all parts of the same. 

KE-EXAMINATION. 
Art. 11. Those who have obtained the mark ''had=l'* 
for a-U parts of one section shall not be allowed to 
j)resent themselves for any further examination 
during that term, but will be re-examined in the 
following year in the whole of that section. 

Those who have obtained the mark '^ tolerable 
=2" for any two of the sections, shall be treated 
as in the above case. 
Art. 12. A candidate who has failed in the final exami- 
nations for the third time is debarred thereafter 
. from presenting himself at the examinations. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 
Art. 13. Any candidate who considers himself unable 
to attend the final examinations of the current 
term, by reason of sickness or some other cause 
which has begun to operate since the date of his 
application, must inform the Director of the cir- 



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COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 79 

cumstance as early as possible. If any student 
fails more than twice to undergo the final exami- 
nations in the proper terms, he may be dismissed 
by the Director from the College. Candidates 
who are unable to attend examinations on the 
fixed days by reason of sickness or some other 
cause, shall immediately report the circumstance 
to the Director. Medical certificates must be 
presented in case of sickness, and in case of any 
other cause, the particulars shall be reported in 
writing. Such candidates may be specially ex- 
amined later on in the same term, if the reasons 
for absence are considered satisfactory ; but 
should the term be already over, they shall be 
examined in the following year as if no break 
had occured. In this case the candidate is in 
other respects treated exactly as if he had failed, 
except that he is eligible to receive marks higher 
than « bad=V' 
By-laws to the Regulations for Elective and Post- 
graduate Students in the College of Medicine have been 
established as follows : — 

BY-LAWS TO THE REGULATIONS FOR 
ELECTIVE STUDENTS. 

1. — Elective students shall, in all matters, comply 
with the orders of the professors of the courses of studies 
which they pursue, or of the Director of the Hospital, as 
the case may be. 

2. — ^Elective students may be ordered to discharge 
the duties of assistants, by professors in charge, or by 
the Director of the Hospital. 



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80 COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 

3. — At the close of the first year after his admission 
to the elective course, each elective student shall present 
a written statement of the studies which he has pursued 
during that period to the professor in charge, who shall 
forward the document to the Director of the College 
with a certificate containing his remarks. The Director 
shall ratify and grant the said certificate to the student, 
if it is considered satisfactory. 

4. — ^If an elective student desires to continue his 
studies after he has finished one year's study, he shall 
apply for permission to the Director of the College. 

5. — In the Hospital, elective students are prohibited, 
except by special permission of the Director of the 
Hospital or of the physicians in charge, from treating 
patients or from using any of the instruments, medica- 
ments, and the like, with the object of treating the patients. 

BY-LAWS TO THE REGULATIONS FOR 
POST-GRADUATE STUDENTS. 

1. — Post-graduate students shall in all matters 
comply with the orders of professors of the courses of 
studies which they pursue, or of the Direcior of the 
Hospital, as the case may be. 

2. — Post-graduate students who make investigations 
in the Hospital may be required to discharge the duties 
of assistant by the professor in charge or by the Director 
of the Hospital. 

3. — ^in the Hospital, post-graduate students are 
prohibited, except by special permission of the Director 
or of the physicians in charge, from treating patients, or 
from using any of the instruments, medicaments and the 
like, with the object of treating the patients. 



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COLLEaE OF MEDICINE. 81 

There are laboratories in this College for the fol- 
lowing subjects: — 

1. Anatom}^ 

2. Physiology. 

3. Pathology. 

4. Pharmacology. 

5. Hygiene. 

6. Forensic Medicine. 

7. Pharmacy. 

These laboratories are provided with all the essen- 
tials for lectures and for students' work. 



There are two hospitals called respectively the First 
Hospital, situated in the University grounds, and the 
Second Hospital situated at Shitaya, which admit such 
patients as may be deemed instructive cases in medical 
and surgical practice and investigations. They contain 
laboratories for carrying out investigations bearing on the 
subjects relating to the sciences of medicine and surgery* 

The First Hospital has six wards containing one 
hundred and twenty rooms, and is provided with two 
hundred and ninety two beds in all ; the ward for medical 
cases containing 85 beds ; that for surgical cases, 88; that 
for diseases of women, 44; that for diseases of the eye, 49; 
that for infectious and contagious diseases, 19; and for 
diseases of children, 7. 

Out-patients of medical, surgical and ophthalmological 
cases and also of obstetrical, gynecological and paediatri- 
cal cases are treated in the First Hospital daily, Sundays 
and holidays excepted. 



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^2 COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 

In the Second Hospital out-patients both medical and 
surgical are also treated daily, Sundays and holidays 
-excepted. 

There are three scales of charges to patients for 
residence in the Hospitals, according to the difference of 
rooms and accommodation, and the kind of food supplied. 
No charge is made to poor patients for medical attendance 
;and necessaries. Provision is made during the current 
academic year for the admission at one time of one 
hundred and ten free patients. 

Clinical lectures on Psychiatry are given in the 
Sugamo Hospital of the Tokyo-Fu. 

Scientific investigations into the nature of "^aMe," 
^n endemic disease peculiar to this country, were carried 
on in the late Tokyo Daigaku and are continued in the 
j)resent University, and a special ward connected with 
the First Hospital is open for this purpose yearly from 
April 1st to November 30th, during the season when the 
malady is most prevalent. In this ward 49 beds are 
provided and out-patients are also treated ; and provision 
is made for the admission of a certain number of free 
patients. 



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COLLEGl! OF r.lSfGTlS'EkiaNG. 8S 

VIL COLLEGE OF EN&INEEEING. 
L OFFICERS, 



DIRECTOR 

Professor Kauy Fourouitsi, Kogakuhakimhi^ Ingeniour i\eB 
arts et maniifftctures, Licencie es sciences. 



PROFE>SSORS. 

JonN Milne, F.G.S., Hon. Fellow of King's College (Lon- 
don), Roj^al School of Mines ; (London) 

Mining and Mctallurriy, 

Charles Dickinson Wist, M.A., C.E. (Dublin University)/ 
M.LM.E. (London) MeohaniGal Enginemvg. 

RiNZABUPvO Shida, KogahahahuHhi, Foreign Mem. R. Hon. 
S. J.E.E. (London) Electrical Evguwerivg, 

ToYOKiCHi Takamatsu, MgakuHhij Kogahuhahushi, F.C.S. 
(London & Berlin), M.S.CJ. (^London) AppUnJ Chem- 
islry, 

RiuTAEo IwAYA, Kogakuhakusld, Hlitten-Ingenimir, (Borg- 
akademie zu Freiberg) Mining and MelaUurgy. 

Watard "Watanabe, Iligahiiidd Mining and Metallurgy. 

SiiiNROKUiio MiYOSHi, KogakusM Naval Architeciiire, 

KiNGo Tatsuno, Kogahuliahuslii AroMtecture. 

Kauy Fourouitsi, KogakahakuHhi, Ingenieiir des arts et 
.manufactures, Lieencie es sciences. . Civil Evgiyieering. 

Naosada Taniouchi, Kogakuhahmhiy B. Se., C.E. (Glasgow 
UniTersitj) Mechanical Engineering, 



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84 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERlNa 

Naoji SfliRAisnr, PdfjakiisM Ciml Engineering. 

IwATA Nakasawa, Eigal'usM Ajyplied Chemistry. 

WiLLMM Kinninmo:nd Bur ton, Memb. [by examination] 

Sanitary Inst. Great Britain .... Sanitary Engineering. 
Genkichi Wakayama, Ingenieur de la Marine (Ecole cVap- 

plication dii genie maritime) Naval Architecture, 

JiRo MiYABAEA, Marine Engineer (Royal Naval College, 

Greenwich) Naval Architecture. 

KoRiYUKT KojiMA, B. Arclit, (Cornell University " 

Architecture. 

Kageyoshi Noro, liigakushi Mining S Metallurgy. 

BuNJi Ma-mo, Kogakushi. M.I.M.E. . . .Mechanical Engineering. 

ASSISTANT-PROCESSORS. 

Michitada Kawakita, Kogatushiy F.C.S. (London M.S.C.I. 

(London) AjypUed Chemistry. 

'{■"Yeiji Nakajima, Bigakushi Civil Engineering. 

Naka Matoba, Kogakunhi Mining and Metallurgy. 

Ariya Inokdty, Kogakushi Mechanical Engineering. 

IwAicHiRO SniDZUKi, KogaJcushi M.S.C.I. (London) 

, Applied Chemidry. 

GiTARo Yamakawa, Kogakuslii Electrical Engineering. 

Tatsutaro Nakamura, Kogakushi Architecture. 

TsuRTJTARO Matsuo, Kogakushi Naval Architecture. 

Umesabtjro Ogawa, Kogakushi Civil Engineering, 

Sachihiko Soyama Architecture. 

Miyagoro Onda, Kogakushi Mining S Metallurgy. 



t Absent. 



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COLLEGE OF ENGINEEEING. 85 

LECTURERS. 

JosMH CoNBEE, E. R. L B. A Architecture. 

ToMOKiCHi YosHiDA, BigakusM Mechanical Engineering, 

IcHisuKE EujioKA, KogahusU, Foreign Mem. S. T. E. and 

E. (London), Hon. Mem. N. E. L. A. (U. S. A.) &c 

Electrical .Engineering, 

YosHiTsuGTj KuRATA, RigaJcusM Civil Engineering, 

OsuKE AsANo, Kogakushi Electrical JEngineering, 

FujiRo Sagane, Hogakushi Industrial Economy^ 

KiYOYosm Kjgo, Architecture, 

ASSISTANT. 

Kumekichi Tomiyama, Kogakushi Naval Architecture, 

II. COURSES OF INSTEUOTIOK 

The following nine courses, each of which extends over 
three years, have been established in this College ; — 

1. Civil Engineering. 

2. Mechanical Engineering. 

3. Naval Architecture. 

4. Technology of Arms. 

5. Electrical Engineering. 

6. Architecture. .... 

7. Applied Chemistry. 

8. Technology of Explosives. 

9. Mining and Metallurgy. 

1.— CIYIL ENGINEERING. 

First .Year. 

Hrs. per week. 
1st Term. 2nd Term. ardTerm. 

Mathematics 3 3 _ 

I'iiyeics 11 11. _ 

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86 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEEEING. 



1st Term, 

Applied Mechanics 1 

Strength of Materials. . and of 

Structures . ., 2 

The.Steam-Engine 2 

Mechanism 1 

"Water Motors, Pumps, Cranes 

&c — 

Geology 2 

Surveying, Eoad-making and 

Execution of works 3 

Bridges — 

Eiver and Sea Engineering — 

Field and Office Works 17 



Hrs. per weet. 
2nd Term, ^rd Term*. 



2 
2 
1 



2 
1 



17 



a 
1 

20 



Second Year. 

Hrs. per week. 
1st Term. 2iid Term. 3rd Term. 

Kivers, Canals and Harbours .... 4 4 3 

Railways and Bridges 3 3 2 

Sanitary Engineering 5 5 5 

Building Constructions 2 2 — 

Geodesy — 2 2 

Industrial Economy 2 — — 

Designs and Drawing 17 17 21 

TmRD Year. 

Hrs. per week. 
1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Civil Engineering Excursions. — Thesis. 

Pivers, Canals and Harbours — 4 — 

Kailways and Bridges — ... 3 — 

Sanitary Engineering , — 5 . . — 



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COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING. 87' 



Hrs. per week. 
1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term.. 



Administrative Laws affecting 

Engineering Works — 2 — 

Designs and Drawing — 19 — 



2.— MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

First Year. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term.. 

Mathematics 3 3 — 

Physics 1^ IJ _ 

Applied Mechanics 1 1 1 

Strength of Materials and of 

Structures 2 2 — 

The Steam-Engine 2 2 2 

Mechanism 1 1 1 

Water Motors, Pumps, Cranes, 

&c — — 2 

Workshop Appliances 2 2 2 

Civil Engineering Drawing 4 4 4 

Mechanical Engineering Draw- 
ing and Practice 16 16 21 

Second Year. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2iid Term. 3rd Term., 

Mechanical Engineering 3 3 Excnrsions. 

Electrical Engineering. . , 1 1 — 

Mechanical and Metallurgical 

Technology — 3 — 

Marine Engines 2 2 — 

Industrial Economy 2 -^ -^ 

Drawing and Practice .......... 25 24 — 



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88 



COLLEGE OP ENGINEERING. 



Third Year. 

Hrs. per week. 
1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 
Mechanical Engineering Excursions. Excursions. Thesis. 

Special extra Lectures — ' — — 1 



3.— NAVAL ARCHITECTURE. 

First Year. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Mathematics 3 3 — 

Physics 1 J 1 J — 

Applied Mechanics 1 1 1 

Strength of Materials and of 

Structures 2 2 — 

The Steam-Engine 2 2 2 

Mechanism 1 1 1 

Naval Architecture !... 3 3 4 

Drawing 22 22 24 

Second Year. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term, 

Naval Architecture 4J 4J 4J 

Marine Engines 4 4 2 

Water Motors, Pumps, Cranes, 

&c — — 2 

industrial Economy 2 — — 

Designs and Drawing 24 26 24 

Third Year. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term, 3rd Term. 

Naval Architecture Excursions. 5 Thesis. 

Marine Engines — 2 — 

Designs and Drawing — 28 — 



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OOLLEGE OF ENGINEERING. 89 

4.— TECHNOLOGY OF AEMS. 

First Year. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term, 

Mathematics 3 3 — 

Physics li IJ — 

Applied Mechanics 1 1 1 

StreDgfch of Materials and of 

Structures 2 2 — 

Mechanism 1 1 1 

The Steam-Engine 2 2 2 

Technology of Explosives 2 2 — 

Theory of the Gun — — 2 

Metallurgy of Iron 2 2 2 

Drawing and Chemical Labor- 
atory. . . 20 20 20 

Second Year. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd. Term. 

Theory of Gun Carriages 2 2 — 

Theory of Projectiles — — 2 

Ballistics 2 2 2 

Fabrication of Guns — — 2 

Theoretical Naval Architecture . . 1 — — 

Workshop Appliances 2 2 2 

Mechanical and Metallurgical 

Technology 2 2 2 

Pyrotechny 2 — — 

Building Constructions 2 2 — 

Water Motors, Pumps, Cranes, 

&c — — 2 

Industrial Economy 2 — — 

Designs, Drawing and Chemical 

Laboratory 20 20 20 



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90 college of engineeeing. 

Thikd Yeae. 

Hrs. perweeL-. 

1st Term. 2iid Term. 3rd Term. 

Technology of Arms Practice. Thesis. 

Fabrication of Gun Carriages 

and of Projectiles — 2 — 

Torpedoes — 1 — 

Special extra Lectures — 2 — 

Designs and Drawing — 28 — 



5.— ELECTEICAL ENGINEERING. 

FiEST Yeae. 

Hrs. per week. 
1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rdTerm^ 

Mathematics 3 3 — 

Physics IJ 1|. _ 

Apj)lied Mechanics 1 1 1 

Strength of Materials and of 

Structures 2 2 — 

The Steam-Engine 2 2 2 

Mechanism 1 1 1 

Electrical Engineering 5 5 5 

Physical and Electrical Engi- 
neering Laboratory 8 8 8 

Mechanical Drawing 4 4 4 

Chemical Laboratory 6 6 — 

Practical Surveying and Draw- 
ing — N — 12 

Second Yeae. 

Hrs. per week. 
1st Term. 2ud Term. 3rd Term. 

TeleiDhony 1 1 _ 

Application of Dynamo-Elec- 
tricity 3 3 3 



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COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING. 91 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term.. 

Electric Lighting 2 2 2 

Mechanical Engineering 2 2 — 

"Water Motors, Pumps, Cranes, 

&c — ' — 2 

Industrial Economy 2 — — 

Physical and Electrical Engi- 
neering Laboratory and 

Drawing. V 26 26 30 

Third Year. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term.. 

Electrical Engineering Excursions. Excmslons. Thesis. 



6.— ARCHITECTUEE. 



First Year. 



Hrs. per week. 
Ist Term. 2ud Term. 3rd Teim*. 



Mathematics 3 3 

Applied Mechanics 1 1 

Strength of Materials and of 

Structures 2 2 

Surveying 3 — 

Geology 2 2 

Perspective 2 — 

Building Materials 2 — 

Building Constructions ...*...... 2 2 

History of Architecture . . *. ' ^— 3 

Freehand Drawing 4 4 

Drawing and Perspective 

Practice 16 — 

Designs and Drawing — ' ' IB" 



3 
4 



27 



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92 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING. 

Second Teae. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term, 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Sanitary Engineering 2 2 2 

Vaulting 2 — — 

Decoration 1 — — 

Architectural Physics 1 — — 

Japanese Architecture 3 3 3 

•Sanitary Building — 2 — 

Special Designing 3 3 3 

Specifications, Estimates, and 

Professional Practice — — 3 

Freehand Drawing 4 4 4 

Designs and Drawing 22 24 23 

Third Year. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2iid Term. 3rd Term. 

Architecture Excursions and Practical Thesis. 

' ' Work. 

Building Laws and Special 

Lectures 2- 2 — 

Freehand Drawing 4 4 — 

Designs and Drawing 18 18 — 



7.— APPLIED CHEMISTEY. 



First Year. 



Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Mineralogy 2 2 — 

Physics IJ 1 J — 

The Steam-Engine 2 2 2 

Mechanism 1 1 1 

Water Motors, Pumps, Cranes, 

&c — — 2 

Organic Chemistry 3 3 3 



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COLLEGE OF ENGINEEKINa. 9& 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2iid Term. 3rd Term^ 

Qualitative Analysis 20 20 — 

Quantitative Analysis — — 20 

Physical Laboratory 6 6 — 

Mechanical Drawing — — 8 

Second Yeae. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2ud Term. 3rdTerm^ 

Building Constructions 2 2 — 

Applied Chemistry 3 3 3 

Metallurgy 3 3 3 

Metallurgy of Iron 2 2 2 

Quantitative Analysis 22 22 — 

Technical Analysis — — 20 

Determination of Minerals". ..... 1 1 — 

Blowpipe Analysis 2 2 — 

Mechanical Drawing -^ — 8 

Th€ep Yk\e. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term., 

Applied Chemistry 3 3 3 

Assaying 7 7 — 

Applied Chemistry Laboratory . . 22 — — 

Designs and Drawing. 6 6 — 

Applied Chemistry % — Thesis. Thesis. 



8.— TECHNOLOGY OF EXPLOSIVES. 

First Yeae. 



Hrs. per week. 
1st Term. . 2nd Term. 3rd Term* 



Mathematics , 
Physics 



3 
1* 



3 _ 

U - 



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^94 COLLEGE OP ENGINEERING. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Applied Meclianics . . *;;;...' "1 1 1 

Strength of Materials send of 

Structures ;...... 2 2 — 

Mechanism 1 1 1 

The Steam-Engine 2 2 2 

Organic Chemistry 3 3 3 

Water Motors, Pumps, Cranes, 

&c — _ 2 

Drawing and Chemical Labora- 
tory 20 20 20 

Second Ye.ve. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Theory of Projectiles .......... — — 2 

Ballistics 2 2 2 

Workshop Appliances 2 2 2 

Pyrotechny 2 — — 

Technology of Explosives 2 2 — 

Theory of the Gun — — 2 

Applied Chemistry 2 2 2 

Building Constructions 2 2 — 

Industrial Economy 2 — — 

Drawing and Chemical Labora- 
tory /••••• 22 22 22 

Third Yi;a.r. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Technology of Explosives Practice. — Thesis. 

Explosives — 2 — 

Torpedoes — 1 — 

Special extra Lectures ...... — 2 — 

Designs and Drawing. . . . •. — 28 • — 

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COLLEGE OF ENGrNEEKLNG. 

9.--MINING AND METALLURGY. 



95 



Fi?t$T Year. . 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Mining 4 4 4 

Mineralogy 2 2 — 

Geology 2 2 — 

The Steam-Engine 2 2 2 

Mechanism 1 1 1 

Building Constructions 2 2 — 

Surveying 3 — — 

Determination of Minerals 1 1 1 

Qualitative Analysis 12 12 12 

Drawing 4 4 4 

Seco]j^d Year. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2Dd Term. 3rd Term. 

Mine Survey 2 2 — 

Metallurgy 3 3 3 

Metallurgy of Iron 2 2 2 

Dressing 3 3 — 

Water Motors, Pumps, Cranes, 

&c — — 2 

Determination of Minerals 1 1 1 

Assaying 7 7 7 

Blowpipe Analysis 2 2 2 

Quantitative Analysis 12 12 12 

Third Year. 

Hrs. per week, 

lat Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Mining and Metallurgy Excursions. — Thesis. 

Ore Deposits — 3 — 

Mining Law 2 2 2 



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96 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING. 



Meclianical and Metallurgical 
Teclinology 

Metallurgical Experiments 

Mechanical Engineering Labo- 
ratory 

Mining Designing 

Metallurgical Designing 



1st Term. 


Hrs. per week. 
2n(i Term. 3rd Term. 


2 




2 


2 


— 




8 


8 


— 




3 

4 


4 


— 




4 


4 



There is a branch of the University Library, situated 
in the Hall of the College, where the books belonging to 
the College are kept, and where are two reading-rooms 
devoted to the use of professors and students. 

Connected with the nine departments of instruction 
in this College are very valuable collections of specimens, 
models, machines, and the like, which are made use of in 
the various classes. 

The College is moreover provided with drawing offices, 
laboratories, and a workshop furnished with all necessary 
fittings, apparatus, machines and instruments. 

The Main University Library and its branch, and the 
dormitories of the Are Colleges are shortly to be lighted 
with electricity, the engines and other apparatus having 
been jDrepared for the purpose in the workshop of the 
College. 



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COLLEGE OF LITERATURE. 97 

VIII. COLLEGE OP LITERATURE. 
L OFFICEES. 



DIKECTOR. 

Professor Masakazu Toyama, Bungakuhakushi, M.A. (Michi- 
gan University.) 

ACTING CHIEF-PROFESSOR. 

Professor Masakazu Toyama, Bungakuhakushi, M.A. (Michi- 
gan University.) 



PROFESSORS. 

Masakazu Toyama, BungakuhakusM, M.A. (Michigan Univer- 
sity) Sociology and Psychology. 

James Main Dixon, M.A. (St. Andrews University), F.R. 

S.E English Literature. 

Chorei Shimada, BungakuhaJcushi, ..;... Chinese Literature, 
Philosophy and History, 

KiYONORi KoNAKAMURA, BungakuhokusM Japanese 

Literature and History, and History of Local Insti- 
tutions of Japan, 
Chiso Naito, Japanese History y Chinese History, Litera- 
ture and Philosophy, 

Takami Mozume, Japanese Language and Literature, 

Basil Hall Chamberlain, Philology, 

Naibu Kanda, M. a (Amherst College) .. . , Latin, 



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98 COLLEGE OF LITERATUEE. 

Emil Hausknecht, Magister Artium Liberalium, Doctor 
Philosophise (Berlin University), Inhaber des Preuss- 
ischen Gymnasial-Oberlehrer-zeugnisses ersten 
Grades (Royal High Examining Commission, Berlin), 
Ancien Eleve de I'Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes 
de Paris Pedagogics. 

LuDWiG BussE, Magister Artium Liberalium, Doctor Philo- 
sophise (Berlin University) Logic, Ethics, 

JSsthetics, Philosophy and Psychology. 

LuDwiG RiEss, Magister Artium Liberalium, Doctor Philoso- 
phise (Berlin University) History. 

Yasutsugu Shigeno, Bungahiihahushi Japanese History. 

KuNiTAKE KuME, CMnesc History. 

HisASHi HosHiNo Japanese History. 

LECTURERS. 

IIlakuziu Yoshidani Hindu Philosophy. 

Mannen Uyeda, Bungahushi English. 

Pierre Xavier Mugabure, M. A., Magister ex Collegis ad 

Exteros, Paris French. 

YujiRo Motora, Ph. D. (Johns Hopkins University) 

Psychophysics. 
Carl Adolf Florenz, Magister Artium Liberalium, ...... 

Doctor Philosophia^ (Leipzig University) — 

German. 
Chojibo Chinese. 



IL COUESES OF INSTRUCTION. 

The following eight courses, each of which extends 
over three years, have been established in this College :— 
1. Philosophy. 
. > 2. Japanese Literature. 



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COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, 

3. Chinese Literature. 

4. Japanese History. 

5. Histor3^ 

6. Comparative Philology. 

7. English Literature. 

8. G-erman Literature. 



99 



1.— PHILOSOPHY. 

First Year. 

HrF. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

History of Philosophy (3) and 

Logic (2) 3 5 5 

History 3 3 3 

English 3 3 3 

German 3 3 3 

Latin 3 3 3 

Japanese Literature 1 1 1 

€hinese Literature 3 3 3 

Science (Zoology or Geology) . . 3 3 3 

Second Year. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

History of Philosophy and 

Psychology 3 3 3 

History 3 3 3 

English 2 2 2 

German 3 3 3 

Latin 4 4 4 

Sociology 3 3 3 

Oriental Philosophy 3 3 3 

Physiology 3 3 3 

Psychophysics (optional) 3 3 3 



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100 COLLEGE OF LITEBATUBE. 

• Thibd Yeak. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Ethics 3 — — 

^Esthetics 2 2 2 

Pedagogics 2 2 2 

German 3 3 3 

Latin 4 4 4 

Psychology with Seminary Ex- 
ercises 2 2 2 

Oriental Philosophy 4 4 4 

Psychiatria 2 2 2 

Philosophical Exercises 2 3 3 

Psychophysics (optional) 3 3 3 



2.— JAPANESE LITERATURE. 

FiBST Yeab. 

Hrs. per week. 
1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

History of Philosophy (3) and 

Logic (2). 3 5 5 

History 3 3 3 

English or French or German . . 3 3 3 

Japanese History 2 2 2 

History of Legal Listitutions of 

Japan 2 2 .2 

Japanese Language 4 4 4 

Japanese Literature 4 4 4 

Chinese Literature 1 1 1 

Second Yeab. 

Hrs. per week. 
1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

History of Philosophy and 
Psychology 3 3 3 



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COLLEGE OP LITEBAT.UBE. 101 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

History 3 3 3 

English or French or German , . 3 3 . 3 

Oriental Philosophy \ 2 2 2 

Japanese History 2 2 2 

History of Xegal Institutions of 

Japan ,...,....,. 3 2 2 

Japanese Language 4 4 4 

Japanese Literature 4 4 4 

Chinese History 1 1 1 

Third Yeab. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term, 3rd Term. 

Ethics 3 — — 

-SEsthetics .2 2 2 

Pedagogics 2 2 2 

English or French or German . . 3 3 3 

Oriental Philosophy 4 4 4 

Sociology.. 3 3 3 

Japanese Language 5 5 5 

Japanese Literature 3 3 3 

Chinese History 1 1 1 



3.— CHINESE LITERATURE. 

First Year. 



History of Philosophy (3) and 
Logic (2) 

History 

English or French or German . 



Hrs. per week, 
lat Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 



3 
3 
3 



5 
3 
3 



5 
3 
3 



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102 



COLLEGE OF LITEKATUEE. 



History of Legal Institutions of 
Japan ^ 

History of Legal Institutions of 
China 

Japanese Literature 

Chinese History 

Oriental Philosophy 

Chinese Literature 



lat Term. 


Hrs. per weet. 
2iid Term. 3rd Term. 


1 




i 


1 


3 




3 


3 


1 




1 


1 


3 




3 


3 


3 




3 


3 


3 




3 


3 



Second Yeae. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term, 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

History of Philosophy and 

Psychology 3 3 3 

History 3 3 3 

English or French or German . . 3 3 3 

Oriental Philosophy 6 6 6 

History of Legal Institutions of 

Japan 1 1 1 

History of Legal Institutions of 

China 3 3 3 

Japanese History 1 1 1 

Japanese Literature 1 1 1 

Chinese History 3 3 3 

Chinese Literature 2 2 2 

Thied Yeae. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Ethics 3 — — 

Esthetics 2 2 .2 

Pedagogics 2 2 2 

Oriental Philosophy ....... 7 7 7 

Sociology 3 3 3 

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COLLEGE OF LITEBATUEE. 



IDS 



1st Term. 

Japanese History 1 

History of Legal Institutions of 

China 2 

Chinese History 3 

Chinese Literature 2 



Irs. per week. 

2nd Term. 3rcl Term, 


1 


1 


2 


2 


3 


3 


2 


2 



4.— JAPANESE HISTORY. 

First Year. 

Hrs. per weelc. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term.. 

History of Philosophy (3) and 

Logic (2)... 3 5 5 

History 3 3 3 

English or French or German . . 3 3 3 

Jax^anese History and Geography 5 5 5 
History of Legal Institutions of 

Jaj)an 2 2 2 

Japanese Literature 1 1 1 

Chinese History and Institutions 3 3 3 

History of Institutions 3 3 3 

Second Year. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rJ Term* 

History of Philosophy and 

Psychology 3 3 3 

History 3 3 3 

English or French or German . . 3 3 B 

Japanese History and Geography 5 5 5 
History of Legal Institutions of 

Japan _. 4 4 4 

Japanese Literature 4 4 4 

Chinese History and Institutions 2 2 2 

History of Institutions 2 2 2 



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104 college of liteeature. 

Third Year. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term, 

Ethics 3 — — 

.^thetics 2 2 2 

Pedagogics 2 2 2 

English or French or German . . 3 3 3 

Oriental Philosophy 4 4 4 

Sociology 3 3 3 

Japanese History 4 4 4 

History of Legal Institutions of 

Japan 4 4 4 

Chinese History and Institutions 1 1 1 



5.— HISTOEY. 

First Year. 

Hrs. per week. 
1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Tenn. 

History of Philosophy (3) and 

Logic (2) 3 5 5 

English 3 3 3 

German 3 3 3 

Latin 3 3 3 

Physical Geography 1 1 1 

History and Geography. 7 7 7 

Japanese History 1 1 1 

Second Year. 

Hrs. per week. 
1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

History of Philosophy and 

Psychology 3 3 3 

German 3 3 3 

Latin 4 4 4 



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COLLEGE OF LITEEATDBB. 



105 



Hrs. per week. 
l&tTerm. 2nd Term. 3rd Term 

Oriental Philosopliy 2 2 2 

Sociology 3 3 3 

History and Geography 8 8 8 

Japanese History •• ••• 111 

Third Year. 

Hrs. per week. 
1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Ethics 3 — — 

Esthetics; 2 2 2 

German 3 3 3 

Latin 4 4 4 

Pedagogics 2 2 2 

History and Geography 9 9 9 

Japanese History 1 1 1 



6.— COM PAEATIVE PHILOLOGY. 



First Year. 



Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term, ord Term. 

History of Philosophy (3) and 

Logic (2) 3 5 5 

History 3 3 3 

English 3 3 3 

German 3 3 3 

Latin . 3 3 3 

Japanese Literature (4) nnd 

Grammar (1) 5 5 5 

Chinese Literature 4 4 4 



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106 



COLLEGE OF LITERATURE. 



Second Year. 

Hrs. per week. 
Ist Te-in. 2nd Term. 3id Term 

History of Philosophy and 

Psycholog}'^ 3 3 3 

History 3 3 3 

English 3 3 3 

German 3 3 3 

Latin 4 4 4; 

French 2 ii, 2 

Jax:)anese Literature 4 4 4 

Chinese Literature ,..,. 2 2 2 

Comparative Philology 1 1 1 

*Corean 2 2 2 

^Sanskrit 2 2 2 

♦Either of these to be selected. 



Third Year. 



Hrs. per week. 
Ist Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

English 3 3 3 

German 3 3 3 

Latin 4 4 4 

Pedagogics 2 2 2 

Japanese Literature 4 4 4 

Chinese Literature 3 3 3 

Comparative Philology 1 1 1 

Chinese (Colloquial) 3 3 3 

*French 2 2 2 

*Corean 2 2 2 

^Sanskrit 2 2 2 

*Any one of these to be selected. 



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COLLEGE OF LITEKATURE, lOT 

7.— ENGLISH LITEEATURE. 

FiBST Yeab. 

Hra. per week. 

1st Term. 2nclTerm. 3rd Term. 

History of Philosoiohy (3) and 

Logic (2) 3 5 5 

History 3 3 3 

German 3 3 3 

Latin 3 3 3 

French 3 3 3 

English 7 7 7 

Second Year. 

Hra. per week. 

1st Term. 2ncl Term. Srtl Term.. 

History of Philosophy and 

Psychology 3 3 3 

History 3 3 3 

German 3 3 3 

Latin 4 4 4 

Oriental Philosophy 2 2 2. 

Phonetics, Versification, His- 
tory of the Development of 
the Romance and Teutonic 

Languages 2 2 2 

English ... 7 7 7 

Third Year. 

Hrs. per week, 

let Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term.. 

Ethics 3 — — 

Esthetics 2 2 2 

German 3 3 3 

Latin 4 4 4 

Pedagogics 2 2 2. 

English 9 9 9- 



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108 COLLEGE OF LITERATURE. 

8.— GERMAN LITEEATUBE. 

First Te^. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

History of Philosophy (3) and 

Logic (2) 3 5 5 

History 3 3 3 

English 3 3 3 

Latin , 3 3 3 

French 3 3 3 

•German 7 7 7 

Second Year. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

History of Philosophy and 

Psychology 3 3 3 

History 3 3 3 

English 3 3 3 

Latin 4 4 4 

Oriental Philosophy 2 2 2 

Phonetics, Versification, His- 
tory of the Development of 
the Eomance and Teutonic 

Languages 2 2 2 

<jerman 7 7 7 

Third Year. 

Hrs. per week. 

1st Term. 2nd Term. 3rd Term. 

Ethics 3 — — 

^Esthetics 2 2 2 

English 3 3 3 

Latin 4 4 4 

Pedagogics 2 2 2 

<5erman 9 9 9 



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COLLEGE OF LITERATURE. 109 

In addition to the regular courses of the College, 
the following elective courses have been established for 
students of this College as well as of the other four 
Colleges. Those who desire to pursue these elective 
courses are required to obtain permission from the Direc- 
tor of the Literature College. 

1. Lectures on History (Japanese) . . 2 hrs. jier week. 

2. Italian 2 hrs. per week. 

Some of the Professors have expressed their willing- 
ness to deliver special courses of lectures besides those 
XDrovided for in the curriculum, should their time admit 
of their conforming to a request on the part of the 
students to that effect. 

KEGULATIONS OF THE SPECIAL 
PEDAGOGIC COUESE. 

1. The Pedagogic course was established to prepare 
students to become teachers in Higher and Ordinary 
Middle Schools. The candidates, who have finished their 
special scientific studies, are thoroughly trained in the 
science of education and the art of teaching. 

2. Graduates of the Colleges of Literature and 
Science, and those elective students of the same Colleges, 
who, during three years, have studied more than two 
subjects, are, upon application, allowed to enter upon the 
Special Pedagogic course, without any entrance examina- 
tion. 

3. Teachers in Ordinary Normal Schools, and in Or- 
dinary Middle Schools, who, having obtained from the 
Mombusho certificates to teach in such schools, desire 
to enter upon the Special Pedagogic course, shall pass an 



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110 COLLEGE OP LITERATURE. 

entrance examination in the English Language, as men- 
tioned in § 5. 

4. Candidates, other than those mentioned in §§ 2 and 
3, desiring to enter upon the Special Pedagogic course, 
shall pass an entrance examination in the English Lan- 
guage and in any two of the following thirteen special 
subjects : — 

-1. Ethics. 5. History. 11. Botany. 

2. Japanese 6. Mathematics. 12. Mineralogy 

Literature. 7. Physics. and Geology. 

3. Chinese 8. Chemistry. 13. Drawing. 

Literature, 9. Physiology. 

4. Geography. 10. Zoology. 

5. Candidates referred to in §§ 3 and 4, are expected 
to understand, to translate, to explain and to paraphrase 
any passage taken from the three following books : — 

1. Logic. Stanley Jevons (Science Primer). 

2. History of Education F.Y.N. Painter. 

3. Education as a Science Alex. Bain. 

They must, besides, be able to follow a conversation in 
English, and must have some facility in expressing them- 
selves in the same. 

6. Candidates referred to in § 4. must obtain, in their 
options, the same standard of proficiency as that prescribed 
for the graduates of the Higher Normal School. 

7. During the Pedagogic course, all Specialists 
shall, in addition to the pedagogic lectures, take up 
two subjects as their particular work. The Specialists, 
who are graduates of the Colleges of Literature and 
Science, and those who, in the same Colleges, followed 
the elective course of study, shall take up any two 
snbjecis cf their Unlveisity course. The Specialists 



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COLLEGE OF LITEBITUBE. 



Ill 



described in §§ 3 and 4, must take any two subjects 
mentioned in § 4. Besides tlie thirteen special subjects 
enumerated in § 4, tbe Englisli or tlie German Language 
may be taken as options. 

8. Any candidate described in §§ 3 and 4, wbo takes 
English as one of his two special subjects/shall, in addition 
to the requirements laid down in § 5, have attained the 
same standard as the graduates of the special course (Law 
and Literature) of the Higher Middle School; and must, 
besides, possess great facility in understanding and speak- 
ing the English language. 

9. Any candidate, described in §§ 3 and 4, who takes 
German as one of his two special subjects, shall have 
attained the same standard as the graduates of the special 
course (Law and Literature) of the Higher Middle School; 
and must, besides, have some facility in understanding and 
speaking the German Language. He cannot, of course, 
dispense with the attainments required in English as stated 
in § 6. 

10. The Specialists shall attend the lectures in 
Pedagogy, the pedagogical meetings, shall occupy, in 
preparation, the time set apart for that purpose, and shall 
avail themselves of the instruction in gymnastics to be 
given in connection with this course. During the latter 
part of their course, they will, besides, be given opportuni- 
ties for direct practical teaching. 

11. At the end of the course, the candidates shall 
pass a final examination. This examination will be as 
follows: — 

(a.) Pedagogical, concerning the science of Education; 
(6.) Scientific, concerning the two special subjects of 
study. 



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112 COLLEGE OF LITERATURE. 

(c.) For all candidates ofclier tlian those mentioned in 
§ 2, there will be added a final examination in 
the English language. 

12. The final examination in Pedagogy will extend 
over the whole course of instruction given in the lectures 
and meetings of the pedagogic course of the Specialists. 

13. The final examination in any two of the optional 

subjects is intended to ascertain whether the candidate 

has obtained a wider and deeper understanding of those 

studies. 

(a). Candidates, who are graduates of the Colleges 

of Literature or Science, or who, before entering upon 
the Special Pedagogic course, had, during three years, 
pursued more than two subjects in the elective course of 
the said Colleges, shpoll show that they not only have 
thoroughly reviewed their University lectures bearing on 
their two options, but also that those subjects which, dur- 
ing the three years of their University course have been 
studied from a merely scientific point of view, have been 
applied by them to the laws of the theory of Education. 

(&). Candidates, who are graduates of the Higher 
Normal School, shall show that they not only have review- 
ed the knowledge of their two options acquired before 
leaving the Higher Normal School, but that they have 
acquired right methods of teaching them. 

(c). Candidates described in § 4 shall show that, dur- 
ing the time spent at the University in pursuing the Speci- 
al Pedagogic course, they have continued to work at, and 
to extend their knowledge of, the two special subjects, in 
which they passed an examination when entering upon the 
course, and also that they have acquired right methods 
of teaching them. 



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COLLEGE OF LITERATURE. 113 

14. Candidates, described in § 11 (c), must show that 
they can write and speak the English language with some 
facility. 

15. Specialists are, on application, permitted to 
attend any other lectures in the Colleges of Literature 
and Science, provided that such attendance at these lectures 
does not, in any way, interfere with their Special Pedagogic 
studies. 

16. After having passed the final examination, as laid 
down in §§ 11, 12 and 13, the Specialists will be given 
certificates stating the degree of proficiency attained in 
the science of Education, in the art of teaching and in 
their two optional subjects. 

Note. For the candidates, belonging to the classes, mentioned 
in §§ 3 and 4, a special certificate will be added, attesting their 
proficiency in English. 



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114 COLIiEGE OF SCIENCE. 

IX. COLLEGE OP SCIENCE. 
L OFFICERS. 



DIRECTOR. 

Professor Dairoku Kikuchi, Bigakuhakushi, M. A. (Cantab.) 

CHIEF-PROFESSOR. 

Professor Ryokichi Yatabe, Bigakuhakushi, B. Sc. (Cornell 
University). 



PROFESSORS. 



Edward Divers, M. D. (Dublin University), F.R.S., F.I.C., 

F.C.S. (London and Berlin) Chemistry. 

Ryokichi Yatabe, Bigakuhakushi, B. Sc. (Cornell University), 

Botany, 
Dairoku KiKucHi, Bigakuhakushi, M.A. (Cantab.) Mathematics, 

Kenjiro Yamagawa, Bigakuhakushi, Pb. B. (Yale College) 

Physics, 
Joji Sakurai, Bigakuhakushi, F. C. S. (London) . . . Chemistry. 
Kakichi Mia?suKURi, Bigakuhakushi, Ph. D. (Johns Hopkins 

University) , Zoology, 

Cargill G. Knott, D. Sc. (Edinburgh University), F. R. 

S. E Physics, 

HisASHi Terao, Bigakuhakushi, Licencie es sciences mathe- 

matiques, (Faculte des sciences de Paris) . . Astronomy. 

BuNJiRO Koto, Bigakuhakushi, Ph. D. (Leipsic University), 

Oeology. 



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COLLEGE OP SCIENCE. 115 

Tsunashib5 Wada Mineralogy. 

ToYOKicm Harada, Ph. D. (Municli University) 

Paleontology. 
IsAo InMA, Bigakushi, Ph. D. (Leipsic Universitv) . . Zoology. 

Seikei Sekiya, Seismology. 

DiRo KiTAO, Ph. D., M. A. L. (Gottingen University) 

Dynamics, 
EiKiTARO FujisAWA, BigakusM, Ph. D. (Strasburg Uni- 
versity) Mathematics, 

ASSISTANT-PROFESSOES. 

Kanichiro Miwa, Bigakushi Mathematics, 

HiKOROKURO YosHiDA, BigakusM F. C. S., M. S. C. I., (Lon- 
don) Chemistry. 

Yasushi Kikuchi, Bigakushi Geology, 

Saburo Okubo Botany. 

Tamemasa Haga, Kogakiishi F, C. S., M. S. C. I. (London) . . . 

Chemist7y, 

ZiNzo Matsumura Botany. 

Chiyomatsu Ishikawa, Bigakushi Zoology, 

ASSISTANTS. 

Hantaro Nagaoka, Bigakushi Physics, 



n. COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

The following seven courses, each of which extends over 
three years, have been established in this College : — 

1. Mathematics. 

2. Astronomy. 

3. Physics. _ 



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116 COLLEGE OF SCIENCE. 

4. Ghemistr J. 

• 5. Zoology. 

6. Botany. 

7. Geology. 

1.— MATHEMATICS. 

First Year. 

Hra. per 
week. 

Calculus 5 

Analytical Geometry 3 

Elementary Dynamics. 3 — 4 

Spherical. Astronomy 2 

Mathematical Exercises Two afternoons. 

Physical Laboratory Two afternoons. 

German 3 

Second Year. 

Hrs. per 
week. 

Higher Analysis 3 

Higher Algebra 2 

Least Squares {I J^^a^S.} 

Dynamics 2 

Higher Physics 5 

Select Chapters in Higher Mathema- 
tics (elective) 1 — 2 

Mathematical Exercises Two afternoons. 

Physical Laboratory Two afternoons. 

German ... 3 



Third Year. 



Hrs. per 
week. 



Introduction to Theory of Functions .... 3 
Dynamics 3 



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COLLEGE OF SCIENCE. 117 



Hrs. per 
week. 



Higher Phj'sics 6 

Mathematical Exercises Two afternoons. 

Select Chapters in Higher Mathema- 
tics (elective) 1 — 2 

Theoretical Astronomy (elective) . . 3 

Dynamics (elective) 3 



2.— ASTRONOMY. 

First Year. 

Hrs. per 
week. 

Calculus 5 

Analytical Geometry • 3 

Elementary Dynamics 3 — 4 

Spherical Astronomy 3 

Practical Astronomy 

Mathematical Exercises Two afternoons. 

German 3 



Second Year. 



Hrs. per 
week. 



Higher Analysis 3 

Least Squares {22nd S:} 

Dynamics 2 

HigherPhysics ..................... .{ISfrSiS} . 

Astronomy {^JfaT^r?^ ''"""'•} 

Practice 

Mathematical Exercises .One afternoon. 

Physical Laboratory .Three afternoons. 

German 3 



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118 COLLEaE OF SCIENCE. 

Thied Year. 

Hrs. per 
week. 

Dynamics 3 

Theoretical Astronomy 3 

Mathematical Exercises ... -Two afternoons* 

Practice 

Dynamics (elective) 3 

Introduction to Theory of Functions 
(elective) 3 



3.— PHYSICS. 

First Year. 



Hrs. per 
. , week. 

Calculus 5 

Analytical Geometry. 3 (1st Term.) 

Elementary Dynamics 3 — 4 

Spherical Astronomy 2 

Chemical Laboratory Three afternoons. 

(1st & 2nd Terms.) 

Physical Laboratory Three afternoons. 

(3rd Term.) 

Mathematical Exercises Two afternoons. 

German 3 

Second Year. 

Hrs. per 
week. 

Higher Analysis. 3 

Least Squares {lltx^lZ} 

Dynamics.* 3 

Higher Physics , . . . 5 

Mathematical Exercises One afternoon. 

Physical Laboratory 

German 3 



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college of science. h^ 

Thied Yeak. 

Hrs. per 
week. 

Dynamics 3 

Higher Physics 6 

Mathematical Exercises Two afternoons* 

Practical Astronomy 4 

Physical Laboratory 

Dynamics (elective) 3 



4~CHEMISTKY. 

First Year. 



Hrs. per 
week. 

Calculus 3 

Elementary Dynamics 3 — 4 

Higher Physics 3 (Half of 2nd 

Term and whole 
of 3rd Term.) 

Inorganic Chemistry 3 

Physiological Chemistry 3 (1st Term.) 

Chemical Laboratory 

German 3 



Second Year. 



Hrs. per 
week. 



Higher Physics 5 (1st and 2nd) 

. , Terms.) 

Physical Laboratory Two afternoons. 

Inorganic Chemistry 3 • 

Organic Chemistry 3 

Chemical Laboratory 

German ' 3 



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120 college of science. 

Thied Yeae. 

Hrs. per 

History of Cliemical Theory (elective) ... 2 (1st Term.) 

Theoretical and Physical Chemistry 2 (2nd and 3rd 

Terms.) 

Organic Chemistry 3 (1st Term.) 

Chemical Optics ; Laboratory One afternoon. 

(2nd and 3rd Terms.) 
Chemical Laboratory 



5.— ZOOLOGY. 
6.— BOTANY. 



The students follow the same course during the first 
and second years. 



FiEST Year. 



Hrs. per 
week. 



General Zoology 3 

Zoological Laboratory 8 

Histological and Morphological Botany . . 2 

Botanical Laboratory 8 

Geology 2 

Physiological Chemistry with Labora- 
tory work 3 (1st Term.) 

Determination of Eocks and Minerals ... 2 (2nd and 3rd 

Terms.) 
German 3 



Second Year. 



Hrs. per 
week. 



Special Subjects (elective) 2 

Systematical and Economical Botany 4 



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COLLEGE OF SCIENCE. 121 



Hrs. per 
week. 



Botanical Laboratory 10 

Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrate 

Animals {r2nci%"e'm ''"'"^•} 

Histology and Embryology ; Lectures 

and Laboratory 10 

Physiology 3 

Paleontology 2 

German ' 3 

Marine Laboratory 

Thied Year. 

ZOOLOGY. 

Hrs. per ; 
week. 

Special Subjects (elective) 2 

Zoological Laboratory 

Parasitology (elective) 2 (1st Term.) 

Bacteriology 6 (8rd Term.) 



BOTANY. 



Hrs. per 
week. 



Physiological Botany 3 

Botanical Laboratory 20 

Bacteriology 6 (3rd Term.) 



7.— GEOLOGY. 

FiEST Year. 



Hrs. per 
week. 



Lithology 2 

Geology 2 

Geological Colloquium 2 



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122 COLLEGE OF SCIENCE. 

Hrs. per 
week. 

Mineralogy 2 

Botany 2 

General Zoology 3 

Botanical Laboratory 2 

Chemical Laboratory 6 

Geological Laboratory 20 

German 3 

Geological Excursions 



Second Yeak. 



Hrs. per 
week. 



Geological Colloquium 2 

Paleontology 2 

Paleontology Laboratory 3 

Crystallography 2 

Zoological Laboratory 4 

Chemical Laboratory 6 

Geological Laboratory 20 

German 3 

Geological Excursions 



Third Yeak. 



Hrs. per 
week. 



Geological Colloquium 2 

Geological Laboratory 20 



Valuable collections of s]3ecimens, models, instru- 
ments, etc., are attached to the laboratories and placed 
under the charge of the several professors. 



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COLLEGE OF SCIENCE. 123^^ 

The following institutes are attached to the Science- 
College : — 

(a) Astronomical Observatory. 

(b) Seismological Observatory. 

(c) Botanic Garden. 

(d) Marine Biological Station. 

(a) Tokyo Astronomical Observatory is the result of 
the union of the Astronomical Observatory of the Science^ 
College with the astronomical sections of the Observa- 
tories belonging to the Home and Navy Departments. 
It is situated in the spot, formerly occupied by the last 
mentioned of these, at Azabu, a southern suburb of 
Tokyo ; the longitude and latitude at present in use being,. 

longitude + 139^ 44' 30".3. 

latitude 35° 39' 17".5. 

The observatory is under the direction of the Professor 
of Astronomy of the Science College. The principal work 
carried on at the Observatory consists of astronomical 
observations, the construction of the Ephemeries and the 
distribution of the standard mean time to all the telegraph 
stations of the Empire. It also gives the time to the 
party in charge of the signal gun fired every noon from 
the Castle grounds in Tokyo. It will also assist, when re- 
quired, in observations necessary for the surveys of the 
Hydrographical Bureau. It is also fitted up for the in- 
struction and practice of the graduate and undergraduate 
students of the Science College. 

The principal instruments are as follows : — 

(i) Transit instrument (by Kepsold), aperture 13.5. 
c. m.; focal length 217 c. m. 



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124 COLLEGE OF SCIENCJE. 

(ii) Transit Circle (by Repsold and Merz), aperture 
14.3 c. m.; focal length 149 c. m.; rad. of the 
Circle 56.4 c. m. 
(iii) Equatorial (by Shroughton and Smith), aper- 
ture 20 c. m.; focal length 270 c. m. 
(iv) Equatorial (by Merz), aperture 16.2. c. m. ; focal 
length 245 c. m. 
(6) The Seismological Observatory was founded in 
1880 for the study of earthquake phenomena, under the 
superintendence of Prof J. A. Ewing, then occupying the 
<5hair of Engineering in Tokyo University. Here have 
been designed Horizontal -Pendulum and Vertical-Motion 
Seismographs now well known in the scientific world. By 
means of these instruments, numerous absolute measure- 
ments of earthquake motions have been obtained. The 
general results of these observations, embodying much 
that is new and valuable, are published from time to time 
both in English and Japanese. 

By aid of the complete set of seismographs now in the 
Observatory, it is possible to measure earth-movements of 
different grades of magnitude, ranging from microscopical 
tremors almost to destructive earthquakes. The instru- 
ments have been placed in various stations, differing in 
their geological and topographical conditions, with the 
object of studying the seismic effects on buildings in these 
localities. Numerous and varied instruments designed at 
the Observatory, are now in use both at home and abroad. 
The Observatory is open for consultation on all subjects 
connected with Seismology. 

Lectures on Seismology are given by the professor 
of Seismology to the students of Geology and other 
branches of science. 



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COLLEGE OF SCIENCE. 125 

The Observatory is very much indebted to Prof. 
John Milne, professor of Mining and Geology in the 
Engineering College, for valuable assistance received. 

(a) The Botanic Garden is situated in Koishikawa, 
about a mile from the University. Plants are daily 
brought from it to the University for the use of the 
students. The students of Botany and of Entomology 
spend a portion of their time in the Garden, which con- 
tains over three thousand species of plants both native 
and foreign. In the largest division of the Garden, plants 
are distributed according to Bentham and Hooker's 
system of classification, as given in their " Genera Plan- 
iarumj' In another division, there is a collection of 
medicinal plants ; in still another division are found those 
plants which grow only in shady places, not to mention 
a collection of rare plants in pots. A green-house, built 
in the European style, contains many interesting tropical 
plants. There are also plant-houses in various Japanese 
styles, such as the Okamiiro, Tomuro, Osakamuro, and 
Anamuro. A building in the central part of the Garden 
contains the laboratory, lecture-room, and office. Attach- 
ed to the Botanic Garden is a very fine pleasure garden 
with a building well suited for the social gatherings of 
scientific and other societies. 

The herbarium belonging to the Botanic Garden is 
of considerable size, though not so complete as that be- 
longing to the Botanic Institute of the Science College. 
The latter contains about four thousand species of Japan- 
ese plants. Both the Botanic Garden and the Botanic 
Institute are always ready to exchange duplicates of speci- 
mens with foreign botanists or with similar foreign institu- 
tions. The Botanic Garden is also ready to exchange seeds. 



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126 COLLEGE OF SCIENCE. 

{d) The Marine Biological Station. 

A piece of ground in Misaki, a town on the north side 
of the entrance to the Bay of Tokyo, was some time ago 
presented to the University by the Imperial Government. 
On it a small and convenient laboratory has recently been 
erected, where students of Biology have to pass at least 
one term before graduation. 

Misaki has long been a favourite collecting ground of 
naturalists, and is noted as the home of Hyalonema, Pen- 
tacrinus, and other rare forms of marine life. It is hoped 
that such a laboratory situated in this favourable locality, 
will materially add to our knowledge of the marine life of 
the Japanese coasts. [For further description of the sta- 
tion see the Journal of the Science College, Vol. I. p. 381.] 



A temporary special elementary course has been 
organized to meet the demand for men who have had a 
thorough training in elementary science, The regulations 
are as follows: — 

1. — The course shall extend over two years. 

2. —Candidates for admission to the course must be 
over 18 years of age, of qualification equivalent to having 
finished the curriculum of an ordinary middle school, and 
of good character. 

3. — ^^Candidates shall be examined in subjects mention- 
ed below, and a certain number of those who have passed 
most creditably will be admitted (the number to be fixed 
by the faculty every session). 



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COIiLEGE OF SCIENCE. 127, 

4. — ^Thero shall be two sections, the subjects of the 
course in the 1st section being Mathematics, Physics 
and Chemistry ; in the 2nd section, Zoology, Botany and 
Geognosy. 

5. The fee for the entrance examination shall be 
2 yen. 

6. The fee for attendance ^all be 2 yen per montli. 

7. At the end of the course, diplomas will he granted 
to those who have passed the required examinations. 

SUBJECTS OF ENTBANCE EXAMINATION. 

1. Japanese and Chinese. 

2. English. 

3. Arithmetic, Algebra and Geometry. 

4. Elements of Physics and Chemistry. 



COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 



FIRST SECTION. 



First Year. 



Hrs. per 
Week. 



Arithmetic and Algebra . * 2 

Geometry * . . 3 

Trigonometry 2ji?aVe"riJ 

Chemistry (lectures) . . .... . . . .......... . 3 

„ (laboratory) One afternoon. 

and ) 
i Ternjs. I 



Astronomy 1 &T '- 



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128 college of science. 

Second Year. 

Hrs. per 
Week. 

Algebra 2 

Analytical Geometry 3 

Principles of Differential and Integral 

Calculus. 2S1?^?-L. } 

Physics (lectures) 4 

„ (laboratory) One afternoon. 



SECOND SECTION. 



First Year. 



Hrs. per 

Week. 



Zoology (General Zoology and Physio- 
logy) 3 

Botany (Morphology, Physiology, with 

O y 1st and ^ 

practice), ^P^irT"* 

^l Terra. J 

Geognosy (Physical and Political Geo- 
graphy) 3 

Astronomy 3|rn^i\trmsJ 

Second Year. 

Hrs. per 
Week. 

Zoology (Embryology, Histology, with 
practice) ...,.,,. 4 

Q ( 1st. and 2nd \ 

Botany (Classificationj with practice) A sJif^'"!^- * 

^ J Term. J 

Geognosy (Mineralog}'' and Geology, with 
practice) 4 

Voluntary lectures during two years : — 

Physics, Chemistry, and Seismology. 



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UNIVERSITY HALL. 129 

X. UNIVERSITY HALL. 

1.— GENEEAL EEGULATIONS. 

1. — Applicants for admission to the University Hall 
are required to j)resent to tlie President af the University 
a written application, setting forth the subject of in- 
vestigation to be j)ursued ; and they will not be admitted 
unless they have sliown their proficiency' in previous 
studies, and can produce satisfactory testimonials of good 
moral character. 

If such applicants be not graduates of one of the 
Colleges, the degree of their proficiency in previous studies 
will be determined by a special examination. 

2.— The President shall, on consulting with the 
Director of the College to which the subject of investiga- 
tion chosen by any student properly belongs, appoint a 
professor or professors to superintend the student's stud- 
ies ; and all scientific investigations carried on by the 
student must be made under this professorial supervision. 

3. — A student at the University Hall must pursue, 
during the two years immediately following his admission, 
some one of the post-graduate courses established by the 
College which is in the line of his previous studies, and to 
which the subject specially chosen by him belongs. 

4.— A student of the University Hall shall be at 
liberty to ojffer himself for the University degree in his 
branch of study after a period of five years has elai)sed 
from his admission into the Hall. In such cases the 
President shall appoint a special Examining Committee to 
test the efficiency of the candidate. 



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130 UNIVEESITY HALL. 

5. — A student who by reason.of misconduct, idleness, 
or chronic sickness, is considered by the President unfit 
to continue his course of study, will be dismissed from the 
University Hall. 

6. — Students of the University Hall are exempted 
from the payment of tuition fees, but while they are 
pursuing their post-graduate course in any one of the Col- 
leges, the fees prescribed in the regulations for that course 
must be paid by them. 



2.-ADMISSI0N. 



1. — A graduate of any one of the Colleges who desires 
to be admitted to the University'- Hall, is required to 
pi-esent to the President, through the Director of his 
College, a written application in accordance with the pre- 
scribed form, at any date subsequent to his graduation. 

2. — An applicant for admission not a graduate of any 
of the Colleges, is required to present to the President a 
written application in accordance with the prescribed 
form, together with a written statement of his previous 
studies, and also with a certificate as mentioned in the 
following article, if he have any such, on or before March 
31st in each year. 

3. — An applicant not a graduate of any of the Colleges 
is required to undergo an entrance examination as prescrib- 
ed in the regulations of the University Hall, and unless he 
be a graduate of a High Middle School or of some other 
institution recognized by the Minister of State for 
Education as having the same standing and as giving an 



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UNIVEKSITY HALL. 131 

equivalent course of instruction, he must also pass 
the examination for preliminary education required of 
entrants to the Colleges, 

4. — Applicants such as are mentioned in Article 2, 
ure required to pay an examination fee of thirty yen to the 
University, with the understanding that the fee shall be 
returned, should the applicant withdraw his name before 
the date fixed for the examinations. 

5. — All students admitted to the University Hall 
are required to take the prescribed oath and to sign their 
names in the University Hall register. 



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132 LIBRAEY. 

XI. LIBRARY. 

The University Library is located for the present 
on the second floor of the new building erected for the 
accommodation of the Colleges of Law and Literature^ 
as the proper library edifice has not yet been built. 

The Library contains about one hundred and eighty 
thousand volumes. By purchase, donations, and ex- 
changes chiefly from abroad, a large addition is annually 
made to the Library. 

EEGULATIONS OF THE LIBEAEY. 

1. — The University Library was established for the 
safe keeping of all books belonging to the University 
Hall and the five Colleges. 

2. — No iDerson is admitted into the Library to look 
for books or to take them out or remove them from the 
shelves, except he be an officer of the Library, 

3. — Books for class use in the institutes of the Col- 
leges and for official use in the University offices can be 
borrowed by a secretary, in the case of the University, 
or by the Director of each College, or by the professor or 
instructor in charge of each institute/ in the case of the 
Colleges. 

4. — The secretary, professor, or instructor is held 
res]3onsible for the books lent from the Library in 
accordance with the foregoing article, but the officers of 
the Library will examine them from time to time in order 
to see after their condition. 

5. — A professor or assistant-professor is entitled to 
have in his possession as books of reference not more 
than thirty volumes at one time, and any other member 



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LIBRAEY. 133 

of tlie teaching staff is entitled to have not more than ten 
volumes at one time. 

6. — The staff of the University other than those 
mentioned in Article 5 may borrow books to the number 
of not more than five volumes at one time, subject to the 
approval of the President. 

7. — The number of volumes being estimated after 
books bound in European style, three volumes bound in 
Japanese style and one sheet of maps, pictures and the 
like in the form of a chart, or one case of the same in 
the form of a case, are counted as equal to one volume 
in European style ; and in the case of periodicals or 
pamphlets published in parts and to be bound in one 
volume after the issue of a certain number, the number 
of such publications vsrhich makes up one complete volume 
is counted as one volume. 

8. — Any person who, on account of urgent necessity, 
asks permission to take out books from the Library, may 
be allowed so to do by special permission of the Pre- 
sident, such request to be granted only when considered 
reasonable. 

9. — Library books, when they are not otherwise in use, 
may be lent on request to Government offices. 

10. — Any person who desires to take out books 
from the Library must first deliver a slip duly signed, 
containing the title, shelf-mark and number of the book 
desired, and the date of borrowing the same. 

Printed slips to be used for this purpose are provided 
in the Library. 

11. — Students who are unable to supply themselves 
with text books, may borrow them from the Library, upon 



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134 LIBRARY. 

IDresentmg the certificate of the professor or instructor for 
whose class tfie book is required. 

12.— Books borrowed from the Library must in no 
ease be lent to any other person by the borrower, and no 
person is allowed to borrow more than one copy of the 
same book, exce-pi for class use in the institutes or for 
official use in the University offices. 

13.— All books borrowed from the Library must be 
returned during the fi:rst ten days of July in each year, or 
whenever the Librarian demands their return. 

14. — 'During the summer vacation, a student may 
borrow text-books to the number of not more than five 
volumes, upon presenting the necessary certificates from 
his professor or instructor and all the books thus 
boiTOwed must be returned before the 5th of September. 

15. — ^When a professor or other member of the 
University staff retires from his position, or when a 
student leaves the University, he must immediately 
return the books which he has borrowed. A new graduate 
is also required to return any books he may have 
borrowed from the Library, before he receives the certi- 
ficate for graduation. 

16. — The reading-rooms are open daily, except on 
Sundays, between the hours of 6 a.m. and 9 p.m. ; but for 
the period from November 1st to April 30th the hour of 
opening is 30 minutes later. On Sundays the rooms are 
opened at 6 p.m. and closed at 9 p.m. 

17. — During the winter vacation, the reading-rooms 
are open from the 25th to the 28th of December and from 
the 4th to the 7th of January, between the hours of 7.30 
a.m. and 9 p.m., Sundays excepted , and during the 



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LIBEAKY. 135 

summer vacation tliey are open from the 11th to the 30 th 
of July and from the 22nd of August to the 10th of 
September, between the hours of 8 a.m. and 12 noon, 
Sundays excepted. 

18. — Every applicant for books for immediate peru- 
sal in the reading-rooms must present to the officer in 
charge a slip duly signed, containing the title, shelf-mark 
and number of any book or books he may require, and 
the date of borrowing, in exchange for which slij) the 
book or books shall be delivered to the applicant. All 
such books, when done with, must be promj)tly returned. 

19. — A ticket for admission to the reading-rooms may 
be given to any one of the following persons ; special 
permission, however, is required for admission into the 
Xiibrary or the rooms iu which books are placed : — 

1. Former professors and other members of the 
University staff who have been in service for 
more than two years. 

2. Graduates of the University Hall and the 
Colleges. 

3. Persons who desire to use books in the read- 
ing-rooms on official business, and for whom 
special permission so to do from the University 
has been asked by the Government offices to 
which they belong. 

4. Eminent learned persons in special cases. 

20. — Professors and instructors are admitted into 
the Library to look for books, and any officer, of the 
University has the same privilege when official business 
requires. 



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136 LIBEARY. 

21. — ^The following students, when provided with 
admission tickets, are admitted into the Library to look 
for books : — 

1. Students of the University Hall. 

2. Students of the highest classes of the Col- 
leges, who have certificates from their respective 
professors entitling them to this privilege. 

3. Students of the Law Section of the College of 
Law (only into the Law Library). 

"When a student desires admittance into the Library 
for this purpose, he is required to give to the officer in 
charge of the reading-rooms, a ticket with which he has 
been previously provided, which ticket will be returned 
to him by the same officer when coming out ; and when he 
has found the book or books desired, he must immediately 
come out of the Library and consult the book or books in 
conformity with Article 18. 

22. — Those who are admitted into the Library are 
required, while there, to refrain from disarranging the 
books or from offering any impediment to the officer in 
charge of the reading-rooms. 

23. — Books delivered to any person for immediate 
perusal must not be taken out of the reading-rooms, unless 
the proper steps have been taken for borrowing them. 

24. — ^Books for use in the reading-rooms are divided 
into the following four classes : — 

1. Valuable books. 

2. Books of reference for the common use of all 
the established courses. 

3. Books specially placed in the reading-rooms, 
at the request of a professor or instructor, for 
the use of his class. 



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LIBEAEY. 137 

4, Books not belonging to any of the above 
classes. 

25. — No one is allowed, unless by special permission 
of the President, to use the books belonging to the first 
<5lass, except those to whose subject of study the books 
relate. In case the books are taken out of the Library by 
special permission for class use, they must be returned on 
the same day on which they are borrowed. 

26. — No book belonging to the second class shall be 
iaken out except by special permission of the President. 

27. — No book belonging to the third class shall be 
iaken out except by the j)rofessor or instructor to whose 
subject of study the book relates, unless by special per- 
mission of the President. 

28. — Books belonging to the fourth class may be 
taken out for not more than four weeks. 

29. — Except when required for class or official use, 
no periodical shall be taken out of the reading-rooms, 
untn sixty days have elapsed since it was received at the 
Library, 

30. — Nothing shall be brought into the reading-rooms 
except books, paper, pen or ink. 

31. — Loud talking, reading aloud, discussion, smok- 
ing and anything of a nature to disturb readers, are 
forbidden in the reading-rooms. 

32. — If any book in the hands of a borrower be lost, 
he must replace it with another of the same edition and 
of equal value. 

33. — ^If any book in the hands of a borrower be 
damaged, he shall make good the damage or shall replace 
the book with another of the same edition and of equal 
value, as the case may be. 



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138 LIBBARY. 

34. — If any book borrowed for class or official use be 
lost or damaged, the borrower shall report to the Libra- 
rain the facts in detail. He may be required to replace 
it with another of the same edition and of equal value, or 
to make good the damage, according to circumstances. 

35. — A person who violates any of the foregoing re- 
gulations, is deprived of the privilege of admittance into 
the reading-rooms, or of the privilege of borrowing any 
book whatever (all books in his hands being called in), or 
is deprived of both privileges, for a period of not less than 
a week and not more than a year, according to the nature 

of the case. 

The case of a i^rofessor or other member of the Uni- 
versity staff who violates the rules is dealt with by the 

President. 

36. — ^When any person neglects to return at the 

required time any book borrowed, and does not return it 

after having been notified by the Librarian, his case is^ 

dealt with by the proper authorities. 

APPENDIX TO THE EEaULATIONS. 

All the regulations of the Library above mentioned 
are applicable to elective students of the Colleges, except- 
ing Articles 11, 14 and 21. 



FEES FOE TICKETS OF ADMISSION 
TO THE EEADING-EOOMS. 

1. — Any person receiving a ticket of admission to the 
reading-rooms in accordance with Article 19 of the 
Library Eegulations, shall pay a fee of one yen for each 
term, or any part of a current term of the academic year. 



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LIBRAEY. 139 

It is understood that the first term shall include the days 
taken up by the winter vacation; the second term, the 
spring vacation; and the third term, the summer vacation. 

2. — The above fee is to be paid at the time when the 
ticket for admission is received. 

3. — Tickets for admission are not available for more 
than one term, and holders desiring a continuance of the 
privilege, are required to renew the ticket at the end of 
each term. 



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140 LIST OF STUDENTS. 

Xn. LIST OP STUDENTS. 



I. UNIVEESITY HALL. 

KoTAKO Saida, Bigakushi Botany {Fresh-water Algae). 

IssHi Saburt, Kogalcushi 

Hydraulic Engineering {Biver Improvement). 

TJmesabur5 Ogawa, Kogakushi 

Civil Engineenng {Iron Bridges). 

Taito Tanaka, Kogakushi 

Navol Architecture {Properties of Steely etc.). 

Ketjiro Okano, Hdgakushi 

Philosophy of Laio {Contract). 

Seigo Nakano, Hogahushi Civil Law. 

FujiRO Sagane, Hogahushi Finance. 

Shogoro Tsuboi, Bigakushi Anthropology. 

Ktkuwaka Sakakibara, ndgahushi Civil Law. 

ToMONAo Oyama, Kogakushi 

Civil Engineenng {Prevention of Incrustation and 

Drainage). 

ToKKAN MiWA, Igakushi 

3Iedicol Jurisprudence {Measurement of height of 

Japanese). 

Manao Hori, Igakushi Ophthalmology { Trachoma). 

Senkichiro Hayakawa, Hogakushi Agnculturol Economy. 

Ryohei Okada, Bungakushi Pedagogics. 

Hantaro Nagaoka, Bigakushi 

Physics {Magnetic Induction). 



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LIST OF STUDENTS. 141 

Yeijieo Haga, Igahushi 

Surgery in general and Surgical Operations. 

KuRANosuKE Matsuzaki, Hogakuski Finance, 

Mannen Uyeda, Bungakushi Philology, 

{Nature of the Japanese Language and Method of 

Teaching the Same). 

Shin Hieayama, BigaJcushi . . . Astronomy {Botation of the Sun), 

Shunkichi Kimuea, BigaJcushi. . . . Physics (Ihernio-electricity), 

JiKEi Hojo, BigaJcushi. . . .Mathematics {Differential equations), 

BuNTARO Suzuki, Igahushi 

Anatomy in general and TopograpJiical Anatomy, 

Kesaeoku Matsumoto, HogaJcuslii Civil Law. 

Kakujieo Yamazaki, HogaJcuslii Finance, 

Hajime Ota, HogaJcushi Administrative science. 

Seiyu Hieai, IgaJcushi Medicine in general and '' liaJcJce." 

HiEOSHiEO HiEOKAWA, KogaJousJii Bailroads in 

Civil Engineering. 

INaeazo Takatsuji, KogaJcusM 

Mechanical Engineering {Spinning of Cotton thread), 

IwAi Onishi, BungaJcuslii Etliics, 

JiNTAEO OsE Bungakushi Psychology, 

Sanji Mieami, , Bungakushi, Japanese political 

History (Tokugawa government) and metliodology. 

TsiTTO MoTODA, Bigokushi, . ..Arithmetic.' 

Kikunaye Ikeda, Bigakushi, Chemistry 

{Belation between Chemical Constitution and Capillary 

Plienomxna). 



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142 LIST OF STUDENTS. 

Masataka Ogawa, JRigakushi, Chemistry 

{Relations of Nitiites, Phosphites, and Sulphites). 

Kenkichi Kjshigami, Bigakushi, Zoology 

(Invertebrate EmhryologyX 

Manabu Miyoshi, BigaJcushi, Botany (Japanese Lichens), 

Kintak5 Okamuea, Bigakushi, Botany (Japanese Algae), 



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LIST OF STUDENTS. 



143 



IL COLLEGE OP LAW. 
POST-GRADUATE COURSE. 



Senkichiro Hayakawa, 
Kuranosuke Matsuzaki, 
Kesaroku Matsumoto, 
Kakujiro Yamazaki, 
Hajime Ofca, 



H5gakuslii. 
Hogakushi. 
Hdgakuslii. 
Hogakushi. 
Hdgakuslii. 



LAW SECTION. 

LAAV (FIRST DIVISION). 



Thied Year. 



^Kametaro Hara. 
*Kamon Shibata. 
Atsushi Oyama. 
Masanosuke Akiyama. 
Kotaro Shimada. 
Kumaji Takenouchi. 
Umazo Hotta. 
Kinkichi Nakada. 
Fujitaro Ofcori. 
Shunkichi Urushibata. 
Gennosuke Okazaki. 
Toshinori Yoneda. 
Hikosuke Kawase. 
Nobuo Tomishima. 
Eikichi Tsunematsu. 
Masajiro Hayashi. 
Bujo Masuda. 



*Kiknjiro Owaku. 
Sadasuke Akij^ama. 
Ichisuke Nakagawa. 
Hirokichi Nakaya. 
Hikokichi Ijuin. 
Koriki Fujita. 
Kotaro Serizawa. 
Kokichi Kitsuki. 
Yonetaro Okuma. 
Shinichiro Yamada. 
Chosaku Miyake. 
Tamaki Nagai. 
Tetsusaburo Kano. 
Kichiro Hirose. 
Michizo Ushioda. 
Kinjiro Hayashi. 



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lU 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



Second Yeab. 



*Seitaro Kubota. 
Kumao Maruyama. 
KakicM Uchida. 
Hikosaburo Shinba. 
Genkicbi Kuratani. 
Tuya Aibara. 
Tamezo Hisamoto. 
Heikiclii TakenoucM. 
Masatomi Hirano. 
Masakazu Hisada. 
Kannosuke Kimura. 
Toranosuke Okita. 
Sbinzaburo Soda. 
* Honour Students. 



Yasaburo Kawamura. 
Morio Nakamatsu. 
Ujimoto Ishida. 
Kichinosuke Shimizu* 
Kume Tomizuka. 
Kishichiro Oka. 
Sadaaki Umemura. 
Tefcsuzo Yamazaki. 
Motoe Narita. 
Genichii'o Kugo. 
Kitaro Nakai. 
Sutekichi Hoshina. 
Tomigoro Kuroyanagi* 



First Yeae. 



Kojiro Ito. 
Seikichi Hamanaka. 
Jonosuke Hattori. 
Tatsuzo Okano. 
Kizo Ogawa. 
Mitsuomi Karasumaru. 
Kotaro Yokoyama. 
Yosliisaburo Tanuma. 
Yunosuke Takenouchi. 
Masujiro Tsuchiyama. 
Kojuro Nakagawa. 
Shigekazu Nozoe. 
Toyoji Noda. 
Kurataro Kuroiwa. 



Yonesaburo Ichikawa. 
Eijuro Hayaslii. 
Gonjiro Tokuda. 
Yutaka Ota. 
Masahko Okudaira. 
Shinichi Kasai. 
Kunikiclii Tanaka. 
Takeji Takigiki. 
Keizo Tanabe. 
Eijiro Nakagawa. 
Takejo Nakamura. 
Fujima Noda. 
Kanzo Kuzu. 
Enjiro Yamaza. 



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LIST OF STUDENTS. 



145 



Tanisliiro Yamamoto. 
Masakichi Masaki. 
Toshio Matsumura. 
Biotaro Fukuhara. 
Isaburo Fukazawa. 
Kikuo Aoki. 
Fukuma Sato. 
Fukutaro Kimura. 
Tsunesaburo Mijazaki. 
Gosaku Miyamoto. 
Bunnosuke Shimizu. 
Tainosuke Shibata. 
Teitaro Hiraoka. 
Biosaku Morii. 
Yushiro Tanaka. 



Sliotaro Yamanaka. 
Yeitaro Mabucbi. 
Yaicbi Fajise. 
Hikomaro Fuwa. 
Cbuji Furuya. 
Hirotoshi Sakurada. 
Kesao Kitazato. 
Bentaro Mizuno. 
Cboichiro Mibama. 
Motojiro Sbiraishi. 
Tomoo Sbima. 
Yoshigoro Shino. 
Yutaro Hirano. 
Shoichi Suwa. 



LAW (SECOND DIVISION). 



'^Suketoki Ota. 
Keikicbi Motobasbi. 
Keijir5 Matsumoto. 
Katsuji Yanagawa. 
Kiusaburo Yasncla. 
Sukenari Ito. 
Giokujo Kito 



TmED Yeae. 

*Kaniesbiro Cbiba. 
Micbisaburo Miyasbita. 
Hariiki Sato. 
Genji Kuroba. 
Naoicbiro Takezoe. 
Yuicbiro Takabasbi. 



Second Yeae. 

Hidesbiro Mita. Asataro Okada. 

Kikunosuke Nakamura. Micbinori Hamada. 

Kisaburo Suzuki. Takeyosbi Matsunaga. 



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146 



LIST OF STUDENTS, 



Shiokiclii Matsuoka. 
Kotaro Ucliida. 
Sanjiro Hayaslii 
Kensuke Hayashi. 



Shigesaburo Ide. 
Kiohei Kakehi. 
Sakae Sugiyama. 



First Year. 



Yosliiyuki Iriye. 
Keisaburo Imaijumi. 
Hikotaro Ota. 
Tsukasa Okamura. 
Heijiro Wakatsuki. 
Kobutaro Kajiyama. 
Tsunemaru Takafuji. 
HisakicM Takenouchi. 
Sadajiro Tsutsumi. 
Shiro Negisbi. 
Tsunezo Kusunoki. 
Kenkicbi Yamanaka. 
Yosbimasa Matsuoka. 
Kakutaro Fujimura. 
Mineicbiro Adacbi. 
Rintaro Asami. 
Kaicbi Saratani. 
Eiicbi Kikawa. 
Hacbiro Mine. 



Riota Itano. 
Kenji Hatano. 
Heikicbi Ogawa. 
Yorozu Ota. 
Eijiro "Wakabayasbi. 
Teizo Kosaka. 
Takesbicbi Tamura. 
Hidebaru Tsuji. 
Rennosuke Tsuzumi. 
Sbinsaburo Nakamura. 
Jirokicbi Yamaga. 
Nariyosbi Maezawa. 
Motoo Fujinami. 
Hiojiro Tejiina. 
Kentaro Arai. 
Sbigematsu Saita. 
Tamotsu Sanpei. 
Aikicbi Yukawa. 
Sbojiro Zen. 



LAW (THIRD DIVISION) . 



*Kankicbi Yukawa. 
Kinicbi lino. 



Third Year. 

"^Masabaru Isobe. 
Kinosuke Amano. 



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LIST OF STUDENTS. 



147 



Biotaro Hata. 
Mokichi Morita. 

Washitaro Nagashima. 
Kinsaburo Hashizume. 
Riuji Otsuki. 
Shigeru Iwamura. 
Keitaro Ishikawa. 



Toicliiro Saito. 
Soichi Sakaguchi. 
Jujiro Murai. 
Masazo Nihei. 
Riosuke Hasebe. 
Misao Kumakura. 



Jusaburo Ikeda. 
Sadaichi Itomi. 
Junkichi Hanada. 
Yukiclii Tanaka. 
Tamotsu Nakao. 
Hiko Yamamoto. 
Kan-ichiro Kikuzaki. 



Hatsuicliiro Oko. 
Sarukichi Yasumura. 
Rinpei Otsu. 
Kashizo Hattori. 
Kosaburo Mocbida. 
Hikoichi Ogane. 
Hiokicbi Masuda. 

Second Yeak. 

Sansaku Satomi. 
Kanecbiyo Nisbiyama. 
Tatsutaro Tsucbiya. 
Keisaku Kobori. 
Takuji Isbikawa. 
Tomokicbi Isbibasbi. 

First Yeae. 

Mitsu Inouye. 
Riutaro Hayasbi. 
Jun Ozaki. 

Kansaburo Nakatsukasa. 
Isamu Nod a. 
Masakicbi Saigo. 



POLITICS SECTION. 

POLITICS. 



*Eizo Isbizuka. 
Usaburo Yanagiya. 



Third Year. 

*Kazumasa Tsukuda. 
Tatsukuro Inouye. 



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148 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



Keisaburo Hashimoto. 
Tomegoro Taniguchi. 
Tomoye Yoshii. 
Isamu Kubo. 
Tetsutaro Sakurai. 
Koichiro Horiye. 
Kotaro Yendo. 
Sukeyasu Soga. 
Junnosuke Takatsuki. 
Ichiji Yamanonclii. 
Mankichi Suwa. 
Seisuke Takizawa. 



Kanetaro Yamamoto. 
Y5suke Yagiu. 
Hisajiro Sewaki. 
Kumao Otsuka. 



Kinsaburo Inanami. 
Hajime Ishikawa. 
Natsuo Hasliimoto. 
Makita Nishioka. 
Motosaburo Tonami. 
Masataro Okumura. 
Kaizo Wakabayasbi. 
Kennosuke Tsuneoka. 
Sukesada Kudo. 
Yatsuka Kuwabara. 
Sanzo Masuda. 
Eizo Matsubara. 



Takejiro Tokonami. 
Shohacbiro Hirasawa. 
Kusuyata Kimura. 
Yasaburo Nomura. 
Yasubumi Sawaki. 
Otoya Tomono. 
Tosbitaro Matsui. 
Eiusuke Einoij^e. 
Takeshi Shirani. 
Ginnosuke Yamazaki. 
Kurajiro Suzuoki. 
Shotaro Nishizawa. 



Second Year. 



Masanori Muraki. 
Seisaku Suzuki. 
Munesada Kurata. 



First Year. 



Tatsumi Iwai. 
Shintaro Ito. 
Tsunamaro Hashimoto. 
Kensuke Hanzawa. 
Seiichiro Tomoishi. 
Nabematsu Wakimoto.. 
Kiyokichi Tsutsumi. 
Yojiro Nakamura. 
Kiichiro Kumagai. 
Seisaburo Matsuki. 
Mitsunobu Matsuda. 
Uhei Fujii. 

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LIST OF STUDENTS. 



149 



Tatsusaburo Agiu. 
Eihiko Sliirasaka. 
Saburo Obata. 



Kuro Soda. 
Taizo Shimotaira. 
Eokusabiiro Mocbiji. 



ELECTIVE STUDENTS. 

LAW. 



Goro Utsunomiya. 
Chotaro Yoneyama. 
Toramatsu Takane. 
Tosbiyasu Nisbikawa. 
Keijiro Momooka. 



Yuji lizuka. 
Toraicbiro Nakajima. 
Mataji Kobayasbi. 
Yosbio Inouye. 



POLITICS. 



Tamon Sasaki. 
Akira Uebara. 
Kiyosbi Nakabayasbi. 



Bimsaku Koriki. 
Yusuke Goto. 
Gorosaku Adacbi. 



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150 



UBT OE BTODENTS, 



III. COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 



POST-GKADUATE COURSE. 



Teijiro Kaga Igakushi, 
Seiyu Hirai Igakushi, 



Buntaro Suzuki IgaJcuslvL 



STUDENTS UKDERGOINa FINAL EXAMINA- 
TIONS IN MEDICAL COURSE. 



*Hayazo Ito. 
*"Waichiro Okada. 
Koan Takata. 
Nagao Taniguchi. 
Yorei Hayashi. 
Seinen Toda. 
Gentaro Yoshimura. 
Yeinosuke Funaoka. 
Keiji Azuma. 
Hidejiro Kurimoto. 
Fujiliiko Sekiba. 
Shunji "Watsuji. 
Bunkuro Henmi. 
Kichisaburo Takashima. 
Shinzo Unno. 
Setsuzo Konda. 
Kyozo Watanabe. 
Kikusaburo Shiraye. 
Tsutsizo Inouye. 



Kisaburo Wakasugi. 
*Hayami Tsuboi. 
Ikutaro Hirai. 
Bunrio Marumo. 
Teijiro Tsuruda. 
Yaoju Tsutsui. 
Tsuryo Mishima. 
Tamekichi Suzuki. 
Hidesaburo Omura. 
Seiso Kitamura. 
Kin Mizuno. 
Shin Yamamoto. 
Kanesuke Ochiai. 
Tomogoro Abe. 
Yusliio Sawabe. 
Teisaku Tamura. 
Yosai Sbimodaira. 
Torataro Yamaguchi. 
Han Hirose. 

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LIST OF STUDENTS. 



151 



Momojiro Nakamura. 
Tomofca Giotoka. 
Hidezo Yoshina^-a. 



*Kmicliiro Takahashi. 
Tsugushige Tsurumi. 
Keinosuke Miyairi. 
Shirokichi Yamagata. 
Tomomasa Masiida. 
ShinsMro Nakazawa. 
Bunjiro Kobayashi. 
CM Okabe. 
Tokuju Nagai. 
Kinya Sato. 
Hisashi Takata. 
Bunkuro Ozato. 
Kiyoshi Toda. 
Shocliia Ogawa. 
Biozo Tsuchiya. 
Ki Matsushima. 
Sbinzo Asahina. 
Olio Terada. 
Sannosuke Sakurai. 
Tokutaro Mori. 



*Soku Miyake. 
Nayetaro Tanaka. 
Tsunejiro Hondo. 
Eai Nakajima. 
Shonosuke Nagamatsu. 



Manji Miyasima. 
Shigetaro Higuchi. 
Tai "Watanabe. 

FouRST Year. 

*Takeji Okamoto. 
Shinko Akanuma. 
Tokuo Suzuki. 

Shinkichi Takahashi. 
Shinkichi Imai. 
Shuzo Kure. 
Tstitai Inouye. 
Keizo Isliiwata. 
Keitaro Kamon. 
Kenichiro Adachi. 
Motome Tsurumi. 
Teita Morita. 
Seijiro Hiraga. 
Yaichiro Chiba. 
Yutaro Iba. 
Sbintaro Okuni. 
Baifu Ota. 

Komataro Hiramatsu. 
Nagamicbi Shibata. 
Issen Takemura. 

Third Year. 

*Icliijiro Kokawa. 
Keijiro An do. 
Kainetaro Nakanisbi.. 
Sadaye Nakabara. 
Junichi Mumebara. 



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152 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



Kojiro Nakagawa. 
Sukehiko Ifco. 
Kugataro Ohmura. 
Tokiyuki Tsuda. 
Yodju Kondo. 
Yeinosuke Kuribara. 
Momoji Kako. 
Shigejiro Machida. 
Yeiko Gyotoku. 
Tokutaro Tada. 
XJshibachi Sase. 

m 

*Morihiko Nakayama. 
Kichi Totsuka. 
Shuku Miyamoto. 
K5toro Yokota. 
Modju Hashida. 
Djun Misumi. 
Sho Sliimazaki. 
Shigetaka Mat sumo to. 
Kaku Toyama. 
Keinosuke Majima. 
Yo Hayasbi. 
Saisuke Nakagawa. 
Sbutoka Tanaka. 
Sbotaro Miyosbi. 
Tetsuzo Yamada. 
Masaiye Kawamura. 

Yasutaro Yedakuni. 
Kurata Morisbima. 



Hisasbi Kojima. 
Koken Tamura. 
Yanoji Ito. 
Yeisaburo Sasakura. 
Yodjuro Kanbayasbi. 
Hironosuke Noda. 
Tetsutaro Izumi. 
Kaitaro Akinaga. 
Keisuke Katakura. 
Nobutomo Suzuki. 



Second Yeab. - 

Sei Sugita. 
Ben Sugimura. 
Usbitaro Matsuura. 
Riujiro Akimoto. 
Yetsuzo Yuwasaki. 
Sakuzo Koike. 
Tetsugoro Ucbida. 
Seizo Sawabe. 
Toranosbin Toyota. 
Kenkicbi Nisbiyama. 
Sbuji Kumano. 
Aizo Ito. 

Tsunetard Murayama. 
Cbime Matsuo. 
Yusbiro Kumagawa. 

FiKST Yeab. 

Sbunji Utsunomiya. 
Yuwatard Kibara. 

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LIST OF STUDENTS. 



153 



Buntaro Adachi. 
Motonosuke Goto. 
Hirokitsi Nishi. 
Genshun Ito. 
Sajiro Fukuoka. 
Inujiro Taneda. 
Kameicliiro Kashida. 
Toraji SMokawa. 
Oario Takase. 
Yeijiro Takemura. 



Torakichi Yonegawa. 
Tatsuzo Azuma. 
Kenji Kasai. 
Kakutaro Kawai. 
Tamejiro Sono. 
Taro Oshima. 
Chikakuni Moriya. 
Tatsusai Ohmura. 
Miyagoro Takai. 
Tetsujiro Mizuno. 



PHAEMACY. 

Third Year. 

*Chonosuke Murayama. Ginjiro Aikawa. 

Keizo Ikeguclii. Tsunejiro Furuya. 

Matsuji Hirayama. 

Second Year. 
Kintaro Uyeno. 

First Year. 
Tatsukiyo Waki. Takasato Kojima. 



ELECTIVE STUDENTS. 



Ikuzo Akizuki. 
Toyoya Yasuhara. 
Kanzo Komatsu, 
Tobujiro YamatanL 



Kaiclii Hirauchi 
Yaju Toyama. 
Seiji Hasegawa. 
Kei Ando. 



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154 



LIST OP STUDENTS. 



Aihiko Sa,ta. 
Hisakiclii Hada. 
Otonosuke Doi. 
Tetsuye Ikegami. 
Hachiro Tamura. 
Kinetaro Kusaka. 
Kaname Kawamura. 
Ichiro Kawamura. 
Yahei Nakamura. 
Yoshio Nishimatsu. 
Kyoya Nagase. 
SMro Amako. 
Yusuke Kagawa. 
Yogoro Itakura. 
Bannosuke Nakagawa. 
Shunjiro Mita. 
Seijiro Nakazawa. 
Shinnosuke Kikuchi. 
Rj^osaburo Motoshima. 
Naotaro Oda. 
Gango Sekino. 
Junshiro lida. 
MasTisada Suzuki. 
Kametaro Takagi. 
Hosaku Serizawa. 



Ryozo Tamazaki. 
Zenzaburo Takahashi.. 
Shujiro Tada. 
Hyotaro Takayanagi. 
Ryozo Uno. 
Sadagoro Sato. 
Ryozo Umezawa. 
Sbigenori Imamura. 
Ototaro Kikuchi. 
Kanji Suzuki. 
Inaji Takato. 
Toyo Tanaka. 
Kyosbiro Numanami. 
Kotaro Akabori. 
Bunsuke Kotaka. 
Yutaka Kimura. 
Waicbi Hamacbi. 
Cbusuke Imura. 
Ai Suto. 

Kiyotosbi Hashimoto. 
Teisaku Ohira. 
Rikizo Kubota. 
Itaro Shikano. 
Tomojiro linuma. 



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LIST OF STUDENTS. 



155 



IV. COLLEGE OE ENGINEEEING. 
POST-GEADUATE COURSE. 



Hiroshiro Hirokawa, 
Narazo Takatsuji, 



Kogakushi. 
KogahushL 



CIVIL ENaiNEEEING. 

Third Year. 



Kusujiro Nii. 
Takegoro Okada. 
Kyojiro Ichinose. 
Jiro Miyake. 
Seijiro Ishiguro. 
Teinosuke Aoyama. 
NarisMge Tadano. 



*Tojiro Sano. 
Chokuro Kadono. 
SuzukicM Sekiya. 
Hampei Nagao. 



Shikajiro Hattori. 
Mitsutaro Ando. 
Sannosuke Hori. 
Eokuzy Noda. 
Yujiro Takasaki, 



^Slioicliiro Kimura. 
Kokuji Takikawa. 
Iwataro Okuyama. 
Ishiyo Ishikawa. 
Shigemi IsMmaru. 
MotokicMro Mizokoshi. 
Sadaichiro Miike. 



Second Year. 



Tatsujiro Takahashi. 
Tamon Tsuruta. 
Kikuzo Ikawa. 



First Year. 



Kusuke Mydi. 
Hitoshi Kojyo. 
Yoshimaru Sameshima. 
Fujimaru Yasuda, 



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156 LIST OF STUDENTS. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERINa. 

Third Year. 
Takashi Matsubara. Takeo Takimura. 

Eyata Suzuki. 

Second Year. 

Pujita Tanaka. Gontaro Shiba. 

Hikozo Mori. 

First Year. 
Tsunataro Sakuma. 



NAVAL ARCHITECTURE. 

Third Year. 
*Seiichi Terano. *Raikichi Shirai. 

Saku Yamada. Yasuzo Wadagaki. 

Second Ykar. 
Tsune Mera. 

First Year. 
Tomomichi Kato. 



TECHNOLOGY OF ARMS. 

Third Year. 
Sliozo Arisaka. 

First Year. 
Sliosaku Hinata. 



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LIST OF STUDENTS. 15T 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

Thied Yeae. 
Jiuki Kobori. Kohei Oiwa. 

Second Yeae. 
Dengoro UsModa. 

FiEST Yeae. 
Ydtaro Wadachi. Jiizo Kajima. 

Iwasaburo Nakahara. Senjiro Oyake. 



ARCHITECTURE. 

Thied Yeae. 
Manji Kasai. Hyozo So. 

Tamisuke Yokokawa. 

Second Yeae. 

Keikichi Ishii. Teikichi Ono. 

Seizo TasMma. 

FiEST Yeae. 
Chiuta Ito. Hideo Mamizu^ 

Keijiro Yamashita. Ikuji Kawai. 



APPLIED CHEMISTRY. 

Thied Yeae. 



Yeikichiro Motono. 



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158 



list of students. 
Second Yeae. 



Yoshigoro Shinoda. 
KiTigo Hirota. 



Kaijiro Kondo. 



Shinzo Endo. 

FiKST Yeae. 

Heitaro Nagaya. 



TECHNOLOGY OF EXPLOSIVES. 

Second Year. 
Kumaji Kusunose. 



Kiutaro Kuroiwa. 



Koroku Komura. 
Susumu Hattori. 
Suenojo Megnro. 



MINING AND METALLUEGY. 

Second Year. 

Gumpei Momma. 

First Year. 

Kaichiro Imaizumi. 
Yoshikatsu Yamaguclii. 



Masakichi Ikeda. 



ELECTIVE STUDENTS. 



Keizaburo Hoshina. 
Saburo Sato. 
Naokicbi Komai. 
Jiro Sakamoto. 
Gengo Yoshikawa. 



Keisuke Nagata. 
K5ta Yokoi. 
Kensaku Kano. 
Taisuke Tabnchi. 
Jitsutaro Kasbiwagi. 

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LIST OF STUDENTS. 159 

Kamenosuke Okada. Sotaro Okamato, 

Sadanobu Yamazaki. Shogoro Shiga. 

Kuniyoslii Kamiya. Hideo Nagatsuka. 

Eokusaburo Kuiiyama. Kiyoshi Hiratsnka. 

Takazo Yoshida. Yoshigoro Wakayama, 
Kano Kamada. KdgdkushL 

Shiukichi Kitsutaka. Shokichi Inouye. 

Keiziro Nakamura. Yoji Shigematsu. 
Tamaichi Wada. 



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160 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



V. COLLEGE OF LITEEATUEE. 
POST-GRADUATE COURSE. 



Mannen Ujeda. 
Iwo Onishi. 
Jintaro Ose. 
Sanji Mikami. 



BiingafcushL 
Bungahushi. 
Bungakushi, 
BungahushL 



*Unokichi Hattori. 



Yasnji Koya. 
Sensei Fujii 



Senzaburo Tacliibana. 



PHILOSOPHY. 

Third Yeak. 

Second Yeae. 

Goichiro Makise. 
KokicH Kano. 

First Year. 

Sokei Sonoda. 



JAPANESE LITERATURE. 

Third Yeaji. 



Mankichi Toda. 



Tomosaburo Sano. 



Second Year. 



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LLST OF STUDENTS. 161 



First Yeab. 

TaicM Haga. Eio Kawaliami. 

Tokutaro Ogaki. 



HISTORY. 

Third Yk\r. 
Masaru Isoda. Kurahiclii Shiratoii. 

Second Year. 



Ginjiro Ogawa. 



Koichiro Urai. 



First Year, 



COMPAEATIVE PHILOLOGY. 

Third Year. 
Sotokichi Hayasbi. 



ENGLISH LITERATURE. 

Second Year. 



Masaki Tacliibana. 



GERMAN LITERATURE. 

Second Year. 
*Teisuke Fujishiro. Torao Suga. 



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162 



LIST OF STUDE>?TS. 



PEDAGOGICAL COURSE. 



^otokatsu Fukushima. 
Yoshigoro Tanaka. 
Taichiro Honjd 
Kanji Matsui. 
Goto Okada. 
Kashisaburo Aral. 



Iwazo Suganuma. 
Osainu Kimura. 
Tomi Tanimoto. 
Suyematsu Inagaki. 
Kotaro Yamaguchi. 



ELECTIVE STUDENTS. 



Junzo Sekizawa. 
Keitaro Hara. 
Riotaro Ohava. 
Keishio Eujisliita. 
Ikuma Osato. 
Shunsai Amano. 
Teijiro Niikura. 
Tamenobu Ochiai. 
Sozaemon Hashiziime. 
Yasuzo Ichinose. 
Heishiro Sugita. 
Mokichi Terajima. 
Kokichi Inada. 
Yasusaburo Suzuki. 
Sukeyasu Murata. 
Yutaka Noda. 
Kito Takemura. 



Matsutaro Kawashima. 
Iwao Kimura. 
Okitomo Akimoto. 
Shinji Sasakura. 
Juntaro Miwa. 
Yuho Yoda. 
Tetsushiro Eunabiki. 
Sukesaburo Isbibashi. 
Hajime Iwasaki. 
Nenosbiro Kumada. 
Mataicbi Takizawa. 
Seizo Tsuji. 
Yosbisaburo Okakura. 
Komajiro Isbii. 
Hirosbi Noda. 
Bun Tokuno. 



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LIST OF STUDErSTS. 



163 



VI. COLLE&E OF SCIENCE. 



POST-GRADUATE COURSE. 



ShunkicM Kimura. 


Rigakushi, 


Shin Hirayama. 




Rigahushi. 


Jikei Hojo. 




Rigakushi, 


Ichiro Shishido. 




RigakushL 


Tsuto Motoda. 




RigakushL 


Kikunaye Ikeda. 




Rigakushi. 


Masataka Ogawa. 




Rigakushi, 


Kamakichi Kishig 


ami. 


RigakushL 


Manabu Miyoshi. 




Rigakushi, 


Kintaro Okamtira. 




Rigakushi. 


MATHEMATICS. 






Thied Year. 




Iwasaburo Sugiyama. 


Second Year. 




Tosaburo Mori. 


First Year. 




Kisaburo Matsui. 


Yutaro Uchida. 


ASTEONOMY. 






First Year. 





Sakaye Kimura. 



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164: 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



*Fusakichi Omori. 
Toshinosuke Mizuno. 



Kintaro Ota. 
Tatsuto Ota. 



*Seiliachi Hada. 
Mataro Horichi. 

Yukichi Osachi. 



*Seitaro Goto. 



Seiichiro Ikeno. 



PHYSICS. 

Third Year. 

*Kenji Tsuruda. 

First Year. 

Seiji Nakamura. 



CHEMISTEY. 

Third Year. 

Tajiro Ichioka. 

First Year. 



ZOOLOGY. 

Third Year. 

BOTANY. 

Third Year. 



Keisho Matsui 



ZOOLOGY AND BOTANY. 

Second Year. 

Shotaro Hori. 



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Kenjiro Fujii. 



list op students. . 

First Year. 

Keishin Fujita. 



*Ikutaro Asai. 



Manjiro Yamagami. 



165 



GEOLOGY. 

Third Year. 

First Year. 



ELECTIVE STUDENTS. 



Asajiro Oka. 
Santaro Nakamura. 
Kimio Nisliizawa. 



Saclahisa Matsuda. 
NabekicM Seo. 



TEMPORARY SPECIAL ELEMENTARY 
COURSE. 



FIRST DIVISION. 



Ryozo Ito. 
Tatsuji Oshio 
Kijota Asanaga. 
Shinicliiro Nakamura. 
Tomegoro Shiokawa. 
Kichiyu Ofuchi. 
Jutaro Kawamura. 
Nariyoshi Murayama. 
Kamezo Matsui, 
€huji Kawacla. 



Tsunekichi Oi. 
Onosaburo Suto. 
Yuji Yano. 
Kozo Nakane. 
Shunjiro Fujisaki. 
Miyachiyo Tetsuzo. 
Tomiji Nagasaka. 
Matajiro Hada. 
Tamesaburo Shiwoya 
Sadahiko Ohaslii. 



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166 



LIST OF STUDENTS. 



SECOND DIYISIOX. 



Ihachi Terada. 
Toshisaburo Hamada. 
Kazuo Ishiliawa. 
Chiji Ito. 

Juntaro Nakanislii. 
Kanekichi Nagahama. 
Chijokichi Inagaki. 
Yasutaro Kubota. 
Katsuini Fukusliima. 
Masuta Funakoslii. 



Jitaro Yamazaki. 
Shusaburo Inoma. 
Yunosuke Tsuchiya, 
Shintaro Hanawa. 
Sutaro Hattori. 
Tsurumatsu Ninomiya- 
Haruchiyo Kakuda. 
Sojiro Daisaku. 
Wakasaburo Nakano. 
Kakutaro Miyake. 



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LIST OF GAKUSHI, ETC. 

Xni. LIST OF GAKUSHI AND OTHER 
GRADUATES. 

I.— TOKYO DAIGAKU. 



167 



Year of HOGAKUSHI. 


Graduation. 




1878 Tetsujiro Msliikawa. ^' 


Takasaburo Fujifca. 


" Kin-ichi Kawakami. 


Shigeaki Hatakeyama. 


" Chinkichi Nomura. 


Masahisa Motoyama. 


1879 Eokuichiro Masujima. 


Kamasaburo Ohara. 


" Biichiro Oyagi. 


fKazumasa Takahashi. 


" Hakaru Isono. 


Genzo Akiyama. 


" Yutaro Yamasliita, 


Michinari Suyenobu. 


" Hisanori Miyake. 




1880 Michisaburo Miyasaki. 


Hajime Motoda. 


" Saburo Murayama. 


Kinzaburo Ono. 


" Takanosuke Iriye. 


f Chojiro Ease. 


1881 Takaaki Kato. 


Masakata Akiyama. 


" Masamichi Aikawa. 


fG-entaro Okada. 


" Teiichiro Matsuno. 


Takesaburo Yu. 


" Mitsuyoshi Suzuki. 


Sakicbi Sakaguchi. 


" Sansei Uchida. 




1882 Yasushi Hijikata. 


Kamenosuke Misaki. 


" Katsutaka Sunagawa. 


Kinosuke Yamada. 


" t-^saka Watanabe. 


fChikamoto Miwa. 


" Kanekiclii Okayama. 


Moroyoslii Ibara. 


1883 Junrokuro Shiba. 


Teiji Ito. 


" Sukeyuki Hiyama. 


fToichi Nisbio. 


" fSeitaro Katayama. 


Naohiko Seki. 


" Jun Isobe. 


Tokutaro Ono. 



t Dead. 



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168 



LIST OF GAKUSHIj ETC. 



Year of 
Oraduation. 




1884 Makoto Yegi. 


Yoshito Okuda. 


" Komataro Kosaka. 


Katsu Kitadai. 


" Yoshitaro Arakawa. 


Toshikazu Isliiwatari. 


1885 Suteroku Takahashi. 


Genji Baba. 


" Ikunoshin Matsuoka. 


Heitaro Tsubono. 


" Seijiro So. 


Seizo Tagami. 


'* Shiro Fujita. 


Yasutaro Ota. 


" Zoji Shibuya. 


Junsaku Hirabe. 


EIGAKUSHI. 


CHEMISTRY. 


1877 Rokuro Takasu. 


Mitsuru Kuhara. 


" Michimasa Miyazaki. 




1878 Tokusaburo Isono. 


Jintard Takayama. 


" Shinrokuro ltd. 


Gibi Hiraga. 


" Toyokichi Takamatsu. 


Ryosaku Fakuda. 


" fKaicbi Kobayashi. 




1879 Iwata Nakazawa. 


Toyota Ishido. 


" Mitsuzo Hida. 


Kenjiro Ota. 


" fYeijiro Watanabe. 


Yataro Kitamura. 


1880 Yoshimasa Koga. 


Hikorokurc) Yoshida. 


" Iwao Ishikawa. 


Monosbiro Moriya. 


" Izuru Watanabe. 


Osamu Matsumoto. 


1881 Osamu Hisada. 


Seizo Imai. 


" Tsuneshicliiro Kato. 


Gentaro Takahashi. 


1882 Toyokitsu Uyeda. 


Yataro Ishikawa. 


" Sbnnsui Sawabe. 


fKakusaburo Tachibana. 


.1883 Kanichiro Koide. 


Kusushi Iwabuchi. 


" Tozo Bannai. 


f Hidetoshi Tokoroya. 



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LIST OF GAKUSHI, ETC. 



169 



Year'of 
•Graduation. 



1883 Yasutichi Oishi. 
" Sagoro Sugitani. 



Tetsutaro Yoshioka. 
Shintaro Adachi. 



rURE CHEMISTRY. 

1884 Yeinosliin Yoshitate. Katsujiro Takashima. 

1885 Yetsunojo Hori. Motojiro Matsui. 



1884 Bunjiro Masujima, 
" Itaru Andd 

1885 Kumazo Tsiiboi. 



A.PPLIED CHEMISTRY. 

Isliitaro Yokoclii. 



Mitsukuni Murase. 



PHYSICS. 



1878 Hisaslii Terao. 
" Teiji Nobutani. 
" Fusaki Sakurai. 

1879 Masashi Namba. 
*' Umekiclii Yatabe. 
" Susumii Samejima. 
« tSMye Toyoda. 

1880 Kan-icliiro Miwa. 

" Tokusabnro Kiriyama. 
" Unari Kobayashi. 
" Teizo Tamana. 

1882 Shobei Tanaka. 

" Aikitsu Tanakadate. 

1883 Sukeyasu Sakai. 

1884 Yeinosuke Yamaguchi. 

1885 Kiyoshi Sawai. 



Yoshitaka Sembon. 
Kyohei Nakamura. 

Kiyo-o Nakamura. 
Yuji Wada. 
Munenori Takanose. 

Mamoru IMimori. 
Jimmatsu Shioda. 
f Tadamoto Sawano. 
Tota Yasuda. 
Rikitaro Fujisawa. 



Shintaro Hayasaki. 



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170 LIST OF GAKUSHI, ETC. 

Year of BIOLOGY. 

Graduation. 

1881 Isao Ijima. Tomotaro Iwakawa. 
" Cliiujiro Sasaki. 

ZOOLOGY. 

1882 Chi^^omafcsu Ishikawa. 
1885 Genhachi Mitsukuri. 

BOTANY. 
1885 Kotaro Saida. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

1880 Teiichi Sakata. 

1881 Tomokiclii Yoshida. Eyusaku Godai. 

1883 Sakuji Yokoi. Sliintaro Kawakami. 
^' Mitsuo Tanabe. 

1884 Shozaburo Gonda. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

1878 Isoji Ishiguro. Mifcsugu Sengoku. 
" Jentaro Mita. 

1879 Sliunji Omori. Kano Tacliibana. 
" Kyosaburo Futami. Wataru Usui. 

" Busuke Nojiri. 

1880 Yasuto Kosliiba. Yoshitsugu Kurata. 
" Tanenobu Oka. Benjiro Kusakabe. 
" Gengord Aoki. fHiide Koshizuka. 

1881 Naoji Shiraisbi. Eyutaro Nomura. 

" Byuta Hara. fSan-icbi Sbimomura. 

" Tetsu-o Tsucbida. Ninao Isbida. 

1882 Teizaburo Nakabara. Kyozo Kumakura. 
" Takesbi Miura. Katsura Nagasaki. 



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LIST OF GAKUSHI, ETC. 



171 



Year of 
Graduation. 

1883 Yeiji Nakajima. 
** Gonbei Oja. 

1884 Genjiro Yamazald. 

1885 Toshichika Wada. 



Sentaro Kondo. 
"Yosliishige Noguchi. 



]\riXING AND METALLURGY. 



1879 Wataru "Watanabe. 
" Ichizo Okada. 

1881 Kentaro Hotta. 

1882 Kageyoshi Noro. 
" Yoshitada Oki. 

" Kyoda Oyagi. 

1883 Osamu Yamagata. 
" Teisho Taguchi. 

1884 Naoki Isliikawa. 

1885 Naoya Yamada. 



Shachio Kawano. 



Sbinji Harada. 
Yoshinori Wada. 

Take-icbir5 Matsuda. 
Kasaku Nakano. 

Haruo Tajima. 



GEOLOGY, 



1879 Bunjiro Koto. 

1880 Tadatsugu Kocbibe. 
" Matsujiro Nishi. 

1881 Takao Fujitani. 

1882 Matajiro Yokoyama. 
*^ Akira Yamada. 

1883 Tosbi Suzuki. 

1884 Sojiro Miura. 

1885 Tadayuki Nasa. 



Denkicbi Yamasbita. 

Kenzo Nakajima. 
Yasusbi Kikucbi. 
Tsunabiro Tada. 



MATHEMATICS. 



1884 Toyo-o Takabasbi. 

1885 Jikei Hojo. 



Kyonosuke Kumazawa. 



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172 



LIST OF GAKUSHI, ETC. 



Yeao^of IGAKUSHI. 
rraduation. 


1876 Kando Ka.wano. 


Teijun Yoshida. 


St 


Washicliiro Ota. 


Noboru Hamano. 


sc 


Cliusen Ishikawa. 


Rokuro Moroga. 


tc 


Tetsuzd Suda. 


Taisuke Yamazaki. 


tc 


Kenzo Mitsuma. 


Gcnshu Yamazaki. 


cc 


Genkei Oka. 


Yutaka Harada. 


cc 


Hogara Uno. 


Jun Sugano. 


cc 


fGentei Matsuzawa. 


Seiken Miura. 


cc 


Yasuji Noguclii. 


Teijiro "VVatanabe. 


cc 


Junjiro Hasegawa. 


Koichi Miura. 


sc 


Atsuyoshi Ono. 


Ikujiro Sakurai. 


cc 


Eyoyeki Nakamura. 


Gentoku Indo 


cc 


Sohei Okawa. 




187S 


) flkutaro Shimizu. 


Masakiclii Sasaki. 


ee 


Jiro Sindo. 


Tsunekichi Torikata. 


tc 


Isarnu Kiyono. 


Chiho Omori. 


cc 


Keiyo Tazawa. 


fKinnojo Mume. 


cc 


Chimata Kono. 


Ucliuji Ishiguro. 


cc 


Kuniyoshi Katayama. 


Rokichi Nonami. 


cc 


Buni Sasaki. 


Seizo Kumagai. 


tc 


Gentan Kumagai. 


Tcliinosuke Sat 5. 


cc 


Kanji Uozumi. 


Keihon Takashina. 


cc 


fYuki Jinnai. 


Yeisuke Nakarai. 


1880 Gentatsu Hamada. 


Yosliikiyo Koganei. 


cc 


Masanori Ogata. 


Hajime Sakaki. 


cc 


Morio Ito. 


Hiroshi Kobayaslii. 


cc 


Hidekata Toinono. 


Jogoro Ise. 


cc 


Yu Sugita. 


Seiiclii Nagao. 


cc 


Cho Hirota. 


Tomojiro Kanda. 


tc 


Konosuke Suzuki. 


Koichi Ishikawa. 



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LIST OF GAKUSHI, ETC. 



173 



Year of 
GraduatioD . 

1880 TeikicH Numanami. 
" Kinsuke Toyama. 

1881 Moriji Miura. 

" Toicliiro Nakaliama. 

" TasukuSato. 

" Tasuku Kono. 

" Masanao Koike. 

" Naokichi Yamagata. 

" Kicliiro Ibara. 

" Tomokata Morinaga. 

" Masamichi Nakamura. 

" Gen-ichiro Narasaka. 

" Kiotei Shiagii. 

" Kakusho Kako. 

" Kohei Nagamachi. 

" Shinjun licla. 

" Eiogo Oikawa. 

1882 Tsunenaga Sakamoto. 
" Jiro Nogawa. 

" Sankichi Sato. 

" Sho-o Shibata. 

" Shikanosuke Inoko. 

" Bangoro Tominaga. 

" Junzo Asakawa. 

" Kaiji Ogura. 

*' Sbigeki Kumagai. 

" Sbujiro Ogata. 

" Makoto Also. 

" Kenzo Totsuka. 

" Yo Yendo. 

" Senya Saito. 



Yukiyosbi Suge. 

Juntard Takabasbi. 
I. Ibe. 

Yosbimoto Katayama. 
Kintaro Mori. 
Konosuke Kumagai. 
Nakagi Yamagata. 
Ken Tanigucbi. 
Yosbicbiro Yenomoto. 
Eyutaro Sano. 
Tsunesaburo Kikucbi. 
Bunsuke Jinbo. 
Isaku Uozumi. 
Jo Yegucbi. 
Kango Sbimada. 
Takeo Kajima. 
Fumitane Takagi. 
Sakaye Furukawa. 
Tanemicbi Aoyama. 
Sboki Segawa. 
Ben Sato- 
Yataro Ota. 
Tadasu Tasbiro. 
Masakiyo Yosbimasu. 
Yosbinori Saigo. 
Susiimu Yosbimura. 
Sboji Yamane. 
Masao Jinnaka. 
Kozo Yosbida. 



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Year of 
Oraduation. 

1883 Jujiro Kawamoto. 
" Moriichi TJchida. 
" Tamenobu Saito. 
" I Iso. 

" Yoichi Ikeda. 

" Kenkichi Urashima. 

" Sentaro Nakayama. 

" Kozo Kimura. 

" f Shuichi Ozawa. 

" ' Toyata Iwasa. 

" Shunpo Chihara. 

" Jiro Minami. 

" Hiroinu Asada. 

1884 Kentaro Murata. 
" Ikujiro Asayama. 
" Tadao Honda. 

" Eiu Munekata. 
" Tomei Kiirimoto. 
" Eokuzo Ogiu. 
" Jiroliei Yamamoto. 

1885 Teiichi Kasliiwamura. 
" Noritomo Masugi. 

. " Yasuo Sawabe. 

" Senmatsu Amaya. 

" Hidetaro Hoshino. 

** Doyu Okuda. 

" Hideji Onishi. 

" Takasbi Hidaka. 

" Gentei Harada. 



Sbuan Otani. 
Muneo Kumakawa. 
Hirosbi Kawabara. 
Sbibasaburo Kitasato. 
Moriyasu Takabasbi. 
Bunsaku Yamane. 
Taro Ogata. 
Ko Sasaki. 
Yo-o-ya Kawamata. 
Heizaburo Tsuruzaki. 
Koicbiro Eiu. 
Otoya Manabe. 
Seiicbird Kuroyanagi. 
f Kiyosbi Matsuzaki. 
Shunkicbi Miyasbita. 
Kanji Hasegawa. 
*}*Gen-iin Kijima. 
Heisbiro Yamazaki. 
Bunzo Oka. 

Jiro Tsuboi. 
Heizo Inouye. 
Homare Sano. 
Tomoye Takagi. 
Mantaro Kamada. 
Gonsaburo Inano. 
Teikicbi Suganuma. 
Nagauji Hara. 



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176 



SEIYAKUSm. 



Year of 
Graduation. 

1878 Junichiro Shimoyama. 
" t^anabu Yoshida. 

" Sabiiro Takabashi. 
" Tokichiro Niwa. 
" . Yoshibiro Notomi 

1879 Kobeida Sakurai. 
" Osamu Fujimoto. 
" Koicbi Sbimada. 

" Tsunesuke Mizogucbi. 
" Hidematsu Takabasbi. 

1881 Masata Hino. 

" Kageaki Magaribucbi. 

" Jiro Fujikawa. 

" Sbuzo Matsuo. 

" Yosbinori Katayama. 

1882 Masasbide Sbibayama. 
" Hidetaro Yaki. 

" Sbiba Nakanisbi. 

1883 Cbusuke Kurata. 



Keizo Tamba. 
Sai Oyama. 
Masujir5 Takabasbi. 
fTokutaro Mimura. 

Jir5 Sone. 
Sbin-icbi NomL 
To Yamada. 
Cbokyo Yagi. 
Sbugo Hosoi. 
Yosbizumi Tawara. 
Sbin Macbida. 
Hirotake Saito. 
Hirotada Omaye. 

Gyoko Yasuka. 
Masunosuke Hirayama. 



JUN-IGAKUSHI. 



1376 flwase Asakawa. 
" f Yosbinori Tacbibana. 
" fKa OkocbL 



f Genkai Kobayasbi. 
fSadakitsu Yagisbita. 
fTosaku Akasbika. 



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176 



LIST OF GAKUSHI, ETC. 

BUNGAKUSHI. 



PHILOSOPHY, POLITICAL SCIENCE, POLITICAL ECONOMY, 
AND JAPANESE AND CHINESE LITERATURE. 

Year of 
Graduation. 

1880 Kenzo Wadagaki. c.a, 
" Shinsaku Kodera. a.6. 
" Sadanaga Koba. h.c, 
" Kakuzo Okakura. h.c, 

1881 Seiichi Suyeoku. c.a. 
" Keiroka Tsutsuki. Kc, 
" Jigoro Kano. 6.c. 

1882 Nagao Ariga. a. 
" Ichiro Yamada. h.c, 
" Yujiro Miyake. a. 
" Hassoku Hozumi. h.e. 
'' Takejird Kimura. Kc, 

1883 Yuzo Tsubouchi. Kc, 
" Tadatake Ogawa. h.c, 

1884 Yoshiro Sakatani. h.c. 
" Kinya Kume. hx, 
" Sliukuro Hjranuma. h.c, 
" Ju-icbi Soyeda. h.c. 
" Shoren Kato. h.c. 
" Gompei Harakawa. h.c. 
" Ichiro Tanahashi. d. 

1885 Yenryo Inouye. a. 
" Kojuro Nagasaki, h.c. 
*' Tsunekuni Mihara. h.c. 



Tetsujiro Inouye a.h. 
Kiyo-omi Chikami. a.h, 
Keizo Nakakuma. h.c. 
Takasuye Fukutomi. ca. 
Kumazo Tsuboi. h.c. 
Kojiro Tatsumi. a.h. 
Inagi Tanaka. d. 
Sanaye Takata. h.c. 
Tameyiiki Amano. h.c. 
Seitaro Umewaka. h.c, 
Chonosuke Ogiwara. h.c, 
Sadakichi Tsuruhara. h.c^ 
Kamejiro Mayekawa. h.c. 
Teishichi Nakahara. h.c. 
Tsunejiro Nakagawa. h,c> 
Kenjiro Hamada. h.c. 
Kinshiro Tsuchiko. h.c. 
Yiiji Fujiyama, h.c. 
Hidero Kasuga. h.c. 
Suketo Sugiye. h.c. 

Yen Kanai. h,c. 
Unto Kurokawa. h.c. 
Eokuro Honma. h.c. 



a. 
b. 



Graduates of Philosophy. 
" " Political Science. 



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c. Graduates of Political Economy. 

d, " " Japanese and Chinese Literature. 



177 



IL— KOBU-DAIGAKKO 


KOGAKUSHT. 


Year of CIVIL ENGINEERINCJ . 


Graduation. 




1879 Kiyoshi Minami. 


Ayabiko Isbibasbi. 


1880 Hachiro Kobayashi. 


Yokicbi Tsujimura. 


" Kokuro Ota. 


Motoi Cbikusa. 


" Kydta Sbibuya. 


Yosbimitsu lizuka. 


" Atsutaka Sayeki. 




1881 Narinori Sato. 


Taki Katori. 


'* Kosei Asuke. 


Moritaka Yemori. 


'' tTsuto Yashiro. 


Yukitaro Takata. 


1882 Senzo Osbima. 


Kyuki Nobecbi. 


" Aijiro Kasai. 


Heinojo Uyeki. 


" Sanjiro Yosbikawa. 




1883 Kaicbi Watanabe. 


Sakuro Tanabe. 


'' Tenzui Kono. 


Sbokicbi Miyagisbima. 


" Zensbi Otagawa. 


Junnosuke Yamaguchi. 


" fJ^saburd Kono. 


Motoi Kamiyama. 


" Yasukicbi Sbimizu. 


Ko Funabiki. 


1884 Taminosuke Kume. 


Kamesaburo Yosbimoto. 


" Hanjir5 Furukawa, 


Togo Ogawa. 


1885 Cb5saku Yosbimura. 


Tokimasa Aisawa. 


" Naka Tomonari. 


Jitsu Makino. 



1879, 



Seiicbiro Fukuoka. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING^. 
, fNaotada Takayama. Sbinrokuro Miyosbi. 
Sbinichiro Arakawa. Seinosbin Tmada. 



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178 



LIST OP aAXnSHI, ETC. 



Year of 
Graduation. 




1879 Koji Miyasaki. 




1880 Yosliiaki Yasunaga. 


Torazo Harada. 


" Tan Saka. 


Jiro Sadachi. 


" Sekitaro. Takeda. 


Yosliisada No garni. 


" Shigemichi Fujita. 


Saneyasu Oka. 


" Euro Yoshimi. 


Kiben Hayada. 


" Yasushi lyeiri. 




1881 Toichiro Usui. 


Shun-ichi Hattori. 


" Bunji Mano. 


Tai Kishi. 


" Masatomo Naito. 


Sbinzaburo Awaya. 


" Masa Koyasu. 


Bintaro Tanaka. 


1882 Ariya Inokuclii. 


Junzo Nakahara. 


" Seizaburo Kawai. 


Tsunezo Saito. 


" Suetaro Kosaka. 


Mataro Kurizuka. 


1883 Hikotaro Mizukami. 


Senpei Inagaki. 


" Hikomatsu Iwasaki. 


Taki Odake. 


1885 Keita Susumu. 


Kyozo Kikiichi. 


" Seikicliiro Hata. 




NAVAL ARCHITECTURE. 


1883 f Suyemiclii Kameda. 


Yoshiaki Iwata. 


" Kicliiro Oyama. 




1884 Umanosuke Fukuda. 


Yasuichi Sugitani. 


" Kyo Aoki. 




1885 Tsiirutaro Matsuo. 


Sliinsaburo Konisl 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 



1879 Binsaburo SMda. 

1880 Takeo Iwata. 

1881 Ichisuke Fujioka. 
" Hatsime Nakano. 



Kosakii Kumakura. 
Osuke Asano. 



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179 



Year of 
Graduation. 

1881 fKakimosuke lida. 

1882 Saitaro Oi. 

" Kdtaro Morishima. 
" Fu Tsuboi. 

1883 fUmesaburo Kotaka. 
" Rentaro Nagayama. 
" Senkichi Kanda. 

1884 Daisaburd Aoki. 



Takamasa Kashiwamiira. 
Gitaro Yamakawa. 
Hidesuke Igarashi. 
Kiinihiko Iwataru. 
Bentaro Tamaki. 
Tei Hasegawa. 



APPLIED CHEMISTRY. 



1879 Jokiclii Takamiiie. 
" Teikichi Nakamiira. 
" Sbinjiro Kishi. 

1880 Sotaro Tsukiyama. 
" Sei Ninomiya. 

1881 Michitada Kawakita. 
" Tamemasa Haga. 

1883 Tetsukicbi Shimizu. 

1884 Masanobu Shimose. 
" Iwaichiro Sbizuki. 

1885 Kichijiro IsMkawa. 



Seikichi Mori. 
Yoshiki Fukabori. 

Zeniclii Imai. 

Chutaro Matsudaira. 

Tsunehisa Fujii. 
Torataro Kawanami. 
Tosliishige Hosokawa. 
Saburo Ogata. 



1879 Kingo Tatsuno. 
" Tatsuzo Sone. 

1880 Hisakichi Fujimoto. 

1881 fFukkei Sakamoto. 
*' Masutomo Ohara. 

1882 Takamasa Niiya. 

" Tatsutaro Nakamura, 

1883 Kinsai Funakoshi. 



ARCHITECTURE. 

Tokuma Katayama. 
Sbichijiro Sadachi. 
Ynzuru Watanabe. 
Masamiclii Kiiru. 



Kikusuke Torii. 



Daikicbi Taki. 



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180 



LIST OF GAKUSHJ, ETC. 



Year of 
Graduation. 




1883 Hanichi Morikawa. 


Shigenori Yoshii. 


1885 Goro Watanabe. 




MINING. 


1879 fKizo Konda 


Masakane Asa 


1880 Tatsuo Oki. 


Sei Kuwabara. 


" Masamichi Yoshiwara. 


Chikanari Matsushita. 


" RydSengoku. 


Tominori Kitsunezaki. 


" Kiniclii Yamada. 


Rikusaburo Kondo. 


" Sukenobu Maki. 




1881 Itsuzo Fujino. 


Shigeru Sugata. 


" Teizo Sera. 


Toyonosbin Tsuno. 


" Eaijiro Hayaehi. 


Masanobu Isbibasbi. 


" Kiutard Nagai. 


Toru Sato. 


1882 fKakichi Miyazaki. 


Naka Matoba. 


" Osamu Ishida. 


Reiji Kanda. 


" Morikazu Mita. 


Rokuro Oshinia. 


" Tetsusaburo Kosugi. 


Kumajiro Harubara. 


1883 Soichi Yamagata. 


Sakujiro Fuji oka. 


" Rokunosuke Suzuki, 


Yeiicbi Matsuda. 


1884 Junnosuke Ohara. 


Ichir5 Otsubo. 


" SeiicH Saito. 


Kenroku Shimada. 


" Igajiro Mamiya. 


Masayoshi Abe. 


" Washitaro Kasahara. 


Itaro Hidaka. 


" Sbiro Yamaguchi. 




1885 Yasusliiro Kawai. 


Masateru Kuroda. 


" Takeji Nakamura. 


Kin-icbir5 Isbizaki. 


" Naga-aki Akiyama. 





]\IETALLURGY. 

1879 Fuyukichi Obana. Ren Kurimoto. 

1880 Yonehacbi Takashima. 



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LIST OF GAKUSHI, ETC. 181 



Year of 
Graduation. 



1881 Shichiro Nobe. 

1882 Kanji Kitamura. 



GRADUATES. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

1879 ^Sbukichi Sugiyama. 

1880 fYoshisada Terauchi. 

1881 *Ichitaro Yamanouchi. 

1882 Eyuzaburo Ito. Isaburo Kambara. 

1883 fKintaro Katsuma. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING, 

1881 Toshinobu Suda. Motoki Kondd 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 
1880 Shinjun Nakayama. 

APPLIED CHEmSTRY. 

1879 Yoshio Toiii. 

1880 Yeinosuke Tanabe. *Kyusbiro Hayasbi. 

1882 Tatsuo Inui. ^Takuju Obata. 
188.3 Masatada Ikeda. 

ARCHITECTURE. 

1882 flsbimatsu Miyabara. Kozo Kawai. 

1883 *Tomotaro Yosbizawa. 

MINTING. 

1880 Ka Okashima. Kiji Arakawa. 

1881 fHoken Cbo. 

* Third Class Graduates. 

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182 



LIST OF GAKCSHI, ETC. 



III.— TEIKOKU-DAIGAKU. 
COLLEGE OF LAW. 





HOGAKUSHI. 


Yearc 


)f LAW (ENGLISH DIVISION). 


Gjfaduation. 




1886 


Shimipei Uyemura. 


Kanjin Tomizu. 


<c 


Keijiro Okano. 


Nagayasu Ikunuma. 


(C 


Kikuwaka Sakakibara. 


Rainosuke Sawazaki. 


(( 


Sukenori Ito. 


Fusbi Inui. 


cc 


Akichika Hanyu. 


Seigo Nakano- 


1887 


Tsunejird Miyaoka. 


Tsunebide Isbii. 


cc 


Kaku Takahashi. 




1888 Kiicbiro Hiranuma. 


Joyei Hirata. 


cc 


Kameji Shibahara. 


Riutaro Koide. 


cc 


Tsunetaro Sbionoya. 


Aisbicbi Tanabasbi. 


cc 


Kenjiro Komatsu. 


Kumaji Nagai. 


cc 


Munekoto Suzuki. 


Kingo Kakizaki. 


cc 


Shin Sato. 




1889 Katsutaro Inuzuka. 


Seiicbi Kisbi. 


a 


Sbigetaka Saito. 


Tomotetsu Asakura. 


li 


Ujito Hiraisbi. 


Ryuzo Tanaka. 


iC 


Sadatsucbi Ucbida. 


Hayakicbi Sato. 


it 


Keisbiro Matsui. 


Tozo Kanzaki. 


sc 


Saburo Kamiya. 


Icbitaro Sbimizu. 


a 


Sentaro Hirayama. 


Cbiyosaburo Takeda. 


(C 


Kojiro Isodani. 


Kiyobiko Nakamura. 


(C 


Yayebacbi Aoki. 


Cbiyosaburo Watanabe. 


(C 


Reijiro Kato. 


Kenzo Isbiwara. 


(( 


Torajiro Yosbizaki. 


Kogoro Terasbima. 


cc 


Sakicbi Yosbida. 


Manjiro Matsuoka. 


cc 


Kinicbi Fukuda. 





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183 



LAW (FRENCH DIVISION). 



Year of 
Graduation. 

1888 Kazuma Jo. 

*' Hikoroku Morozumi. 

" Kitsuo Tashiro. 

" Tpmosaburo KinosMta. 

" Sliinzo Kainijo. 

" Nobuhide Matsudaira. 

" Seiseki Fukui. 

" Yeizaburo Kamei. 

" Matsutaro Itakura. 

" Sanyu Hori. 

" Seisuke Nakajima. 

1888 Shigemori Fujita. 
" Ichirosuke Ishio. 
" Fujio Itagaki. 

" Sonosuke Yamamoto. 
" Seiicbi Hara. 
" Kinicbiro Isbikawa. 
" Sbiro Takita. 

1889 Saburo Yosbiwara. 
" Kyotaro Kamiyama. 



Hideo Yokota. 
Minesaburo Ota. 
Takekuma Kakibara. 
Cbuzo Okura. 
Cbuji Yendo. 
Katsunosuke Icbikawa. 
Kokiu Saitd 
Masane Kawada. 
Tokicbiro Noda. 
Kanetaro Kusaka. 
Hiokicbi Mizumoto. 
Naobide Kameyama. 
Fujimaro Tsuda. 
Keijiro Tainaki. 
Sbigemasa Macbida. 
Ko Ota 
Terunosuke Watanabe. 

Kesaroku Matsumoto. 



POLITICS. 



1886 Fujir5 Sagane. 

1887 Kitokuro Ikki. 

" Senkicbiro Hayakawa. 
" Tomosada Asada. 
" Masaya Suzuki. 
1888 Jusbiro Kiucbi. 
" Kazuye Ito. 
" Yeki ffioki. 



Kosai Ucbida. 
G-onsuke Hayasbi. 
Kametaro Hayasbida. 
Kan-icbi Oba. 
Kuranosuke Matsuzaki. 
Torajiro Nomura. 
Tosbiyuki Haragucbi. 



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1888 Masakichi Miyazaki. 
" Sadakichi Suzuki. 

" Kinjiro Takemura. 

*' Sasuke Oura. 

1889 Gentaro Sliimura. 
" Kiyotaro Tsuda. 

" Nagabumi Ariga. 

" Hajime Ota. 

" Tetsujiro Shidaclii. 

" Naonosuke Kawakami. 



Saijiro Takei. 
Kanaye Tozawa. 
Sokichi Yamaguchi. 

Tetsutaro Aoki. 
Kakujiro Yamazaki. 
Sentaro Kaneko. 
Yoshisaburo Susaki. 
Kine Tomobira. 



COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 
IGAKUSHL 



1886 Sokei Tsutsumi. 

" Seiichiro Ninomiya. 

" Masato Kusunoki. 

'' Jyulto. 

" Takuzo Yanagi. 

" t^anpei Ucbida. 

„ Hidema Katsura. * 

" Hisayasu Mita. 

" Taketsugu Sbimada. 

" Eenpei Mizuno. 

" Tameji Tsunemocbi. 

" Kunitaro Okada. 

1887 Yosbito Inoko. 
" GensbiSeo. 

" Ubito Takayasu. 



Kiuyo Sarai 
Ainosuke Suzuki. 
Sannosuke Ogawa. 
Takegoro Kimura. 
Haruka Saito. 
Tsunebisa Sato. 
Hidejird Matsui. 
Micbizumi Hanabusa. 
Teizo Takabata. 
Tan Takeda. 
Tokkan Miwa. 
Nagabide Kasbiwabara. 
Sataro Hirose. 
Hiroyasu Ota. 
Sbobei Takayama. 



Kunisaburo Narabayasbi. Kaizo Arimatsu. 



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185 



Year of 
•Graduation. 

1887 Tsunekatsu Kurimoto. 
" Yasuzo Ikehara. 

" Manao Hori. 

" Kan Yamazaki. 

" Kenji Yamada. 

" Yoshio Yashiro. 

" Shuniclii Shimamura. 

" Ben Hori. 

" Tozaburd Watanabe. 

« Bunjiro Toki. 

" Kiujiro Kanki. 

1888 Kinnosuke Miura. 
" Gakutaro Osawa. 
" Taizo Kono. 

" Kwaitaro Sakata. 

" Sansei Matsumura. 

" Koiclii Shishido 

*' Doseki Uyama. 

" Koiclii Shibata. 

" Kokichi Takahashi. 

" Biutoku Koyama. 

*' Jun Hatano. 

" Biutaro Ikoma. 

" Taisuke Kawase. 

" Yoshitada Kato. 

" Sonosuke Shisbido. 

1889 SeiyuHirai. 

" Teiicbird Tada. 

" Kyoicbiro Kajita. 

" Bnntaro Suzuki. 

^' Midori Ito. 



Naganori Majima. 
Sbunyo Torii. 
Joun Kitamura. 
Hosaku Inouye* 
Yentaro Muya. 
Yasuzo Makita. 
Seiken Takenaka. 
Kenkicbi Makiyama. 
Kenzaburo Adacbi. 
Naojiro Yamamura. 
Teiji Fuse. 
Yeijiro Haga. 
Sbizuo Yema. 
Yosbitaka Onisbi. 
Nenjiro Cbiba. 
Seita Nose. 
Kosanda Onisbi. 
Matajiro Hikita. 
Seiji Seki. 
Tokuzo Horiucbi. 
Iwajiro Yamada. 
Naonosbin Uyebara. 
Kumoji Sasaki. 
Tomomicbi Mori. 
By5taku Koike. 

Katsusabur5 Yamagiwa. 
Byosbo Okamoto. 
Gitoku Tasbiro. 
Kenzo Watanabe. 
Kanejiro Isbii. 



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LIST OF GAKUSHI, ETC. 



Year of 
Graduation. 




1889 Genjiro Inouye. 


Matakiclii Masaki. 




Tatsukichi Irizawa. 


Mitsuoki Kasabara. 




Gakusaburo Tada. 


Miozo Sasagawa. 




Tosaburo Yendo. 


Tom Imai. 




Takeliiko Goto. 


Ryosaku Fujiye. 




Komazo Yoshimatsu. 


Tsutomu Inouye. 




Toyosaku Murata. 


Tsunejiro Kondo. 




Keisuke Tanaka. 


Kingo Shiono. 




Micliio Fujiwara. 


Shiihei Sbibuya. 




Chdnosuke Kasai. 


Kitae Onisbi. 




Kyiii Kuwabara. 


Toku Sumikawa. 




Hiroshi Ozawa. 


Seiji Yasuo. 




BuDJi Watanabe. 


Gikatsu Noda. 




Morio Fukushima. 


Hiroo Kawana. 




Saneaki Kamizaka. 


Motoyoshi Hirabara. 




Tei Ino. 


Rinjiro Iwai. 




Tsuneo Hoaslii. 





COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING. 

KOGAKUSHL 

CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

(Students of the late Kobu-Daigakko). 

1886 Seitaro Mukasa. Issbi Saburi. 

Umesaburo Ogawa. 



" Koran Sugawara. 

" Tomonao Oyama. 

" Tosbiro Uyeda. 

" Kinnosuke Torikoye. 



Tomoyosbi Ktino. 
Toyotaro Kuroda. 



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187 



Year of 
Graduation. 

1886 Hakujiro Kobayaslii. 

1887 Toragoro Kondo. 
'^ Tsunejiro Nambu. 

" Hidejiro Watanabe. 
" Masaye Hayashi. 

1888 Hidesaburo Nakayama. 
*^ Kyoiclii Murakami. 

" Ken Kudo. 

" Fusayosbi Nozawa. 

" Matsutaro Mocbigase. 

" Inazo Toya. 

" Issei Oki. 

1889 Hirosbiro Hirokawa. 
" Sukibiko Niwa. 

" Yosbiki Okazaki. 
" Sbunpei Yegawa. 
" Kesajiro Masuda. 



Tajima Tanimura. 
Nobusbiro Watanabe. 
Toyojuro Nagasaki. 
Sbuntard Yamagucbi. 
Tokujiro Inouye. 
Kumema Nogucbi 
Sbigenaga Yosbiwara. 
Tadasbi Okubo. 
Kinzaburo Kisbi. 
Kozaburo Tanii. 
Masao Yamagami. 

Torataro Nisbio. 
Mofcojiro linuma. 
Sbinbei Kunizawa. 
Rokuro "Watanabe. 



MECHANICAL EXGINEERINd. 
(Students of the late K5bu-Daigakko). 
1886 Teikan Atsumi. Kanicbi Utsunomiya. 



" Hidebisa Sbimoyama 

" Riu Watanabe. 
1887 Ritaro Hirota. 

" Suketaro Takai. 
1889 Narazo Takafcsuji. 

NATAL ARCHITECTURE. 
(Student of the late Kobu-Daigakko). 
1886 Taitd Tanaka. 



Matsujiro Obira. 
Cbiyokicbi Suzuki. 
Sbozo Tomonaga. 

Inosuke Okubo. 



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188 LIST OF GAKUSHI, ETC. 

Year of 
Graduation. 

1887 Bunichiro Fukuchi. Kyo Watanabe. 
" Takahisa Shirato. Tatsukichi Ito. 

1888 Sakutaro Takakura. Tomiiclii Uyeno. 

1889 Kumekichi Toyama. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

(Student of the late Kobu-Daigakko). 
1886 Seisuke Hayashi. 



1887 Masamiclii Niwa. Hayatsuclii Kodama. 

1888 Junsuke Miyake. Toraji Bannai. 

1889 Sekitaro Nakagawa. Torajiro Koki. 
" Toraicliiro Ikeda. 

ARCHTTECrURE. 

(Student oe the late Kobu-Daigakko). 
1886 Toyosuke Tanaka. 



1888 Nisliijird Nakahama. 



APPLIED CHEMISTRY. 
(Students of the late Kobu-Daigakko). 
1886 Chikamasa Okubo. Toshi-o IcHkawa. 



" Kinzaburo Ichino. 
1887 Sukesaburo Doi. Masuo Moriyama. 

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LIST or GAKUSHI, ETC. 



189 



Year of 
Graduation. 

1888 Matsimosuke Hosoki. 
" Sentaro Tsuboi. 

" Kaichiro Suto. 
" Takeo Watanabe. 
" Hyotaro Umeno. 
*' Yoshihiko Okajima. 

1889 Minejiro Tonami. 

" Kyotaro Kitamura. 



Gorokichi Nakagawa. 
Gisuke Ikuta. 
Yosliima Yamadera, 
Kenji Saito. 
Yoshigoro Wakayama. 

Santei Utsumi. 
Kanetomi Yoshimura. 



MINING. 
(Students of the late Kobu-Daigakko). 
1886 Seizokii Yonekura. Icliisuke Ohigata. 

MINING AND METALLURGY. 

1886 Buntaro Yamada. 

1887 Hachiya Ishida. Yosliitaro Watanabe. 

1888 Miyagoro On da. Teizabnro Hori. 
" Gi-ichi Akiyama. Seitaro XJchida. 

1889 Seigo NisMyama. 



COLLEGE OF LITERATURE. 



BUNGAKUSHI. 

PHILOSOPHY. 

1886 Shinjitsu Hidaka. 
" Ginnosuke Sakakura. 

1887 Mitsuyuki Tokunaga. 
" Junzaburo Umemoto. 

1888 Masataro Sawayanagi, 

1889 Sliuku Onishi. 
" Tonosuke Watanabe. 



Icliizo Nagasawa. 
Ryohei Okada. 

Jintaro Ose. 



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i9d LIST OF GAKUSHI, ETC. 

Year of 
Graduation. 

JAPANESE LITERATURE. 

1886 Tsunetard Toda. 

1888 Mannen Ujeda. 

1889 Sanji Mikami. Kuwasaburo Takatsn. 

HISTORY. 
1889 Kwanichiro Shimoyama. 



COLLEGE OF SCIENCE. 

RIGAKUSHI. 

MATHEMATICS. 

1888 Kokichi Kand 

1889 Tsuto Motoda. Jutaro Kawai. 

ASTRONOMY. 

1888 Shin Hirayama. Keizaburo Ashino. 

1889 Shonosuke Ijima. 

PHYSICS. 

1886 Jim Hirayama. Masnmi Saneyoslii. 

1887 Hantaro Nagaoka. 

1888 Shunkichi Kimura. 

CHEMISTRY. 

1886 Kiyotoshi Makino. 

1889 Kikunaye Ikeda. Masataka Ogawa. 



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LIST OF GAKUSHI, ETC. 191 

Year of 
Graduation. 

ZOOLOGY. 
1886 Shogoro Tsuboi. 

1888 Ichiro Shishido. 

1889 Masamaru Inaba. Kenkichi Kishigami. 

. BOTANY. 

1886 Kotaro Shirai. Naomaro Oyatsu. 

1887 Chikaye Tsuge. 

1889 Manabu Miyoshi. Kintaro Okamura. 

GEOLOGY. 

1887 Kotora Jinbo. Sen-ichi Ofcsuka. 

1888 Shosliiro Matsushima. Hatsujiro Shibata. 

1889 Narataro Kaneda. 



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192 LIST OF HAKUSHI. 

XIV. LIST OP HAKUSHL* 



HOGAKUHAKUSHI. 

Conferred. 

May, 1888. Einsho Mitsukuri. Inajiro Tajiri. 

" " Takeo Kikuchi. Nobushige Hozumi. 

" " Kazuo Hatoyama. 

June, 1888. Shoichi Inouye. Hiroji Kinoshita. 

*' " Binzo Kumano. Teruhiko Okamura. 

" *' Masaakira Tomii. 



IGAKUHAKUSHI. 

May, 1888. Kensai Ikeda. Kojo Hashimoto. 

" " Hiidzu Miyake. Kenkan Takagi. 

" '• Kenji Osawa. 

June, 1888. Kazuyoshi Taguclii. Susumn Sat5. 

" " Masanori Ogata. Masakichi Sasaki. 

" " Yosliikiyo Koganei. 



KOGAKUHAKUSHI. 

May, 1888. S5icliiro Matsumoto. Kaname Haraguclii. 

" " Kany Fourouitsi. Yoshinosuke Hasegawa. 

" " Einzaburo Sbida. 

June, 1888. Toyokicbi Takamatsu. Naosada Tanigucbi. 

" " Seijiro Hirai. Kin go Tatsuno. 

" " Eiutard Iwaya. 

*Degrees weie conferred tinder the 2nd provision of Article III of 
Imperial Ordinance No. 13. See page 17. 



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LIST OF HAKUSHI. 

BUNGAKUHAKUSHI. 



193 



Conferred. 



May, 1888. Kiyonori Konakamura. Yasutsugu Sliigeno. 



June, 1888. 



Hiroyuki Kato. 
Masakazu Toyama. 
Mayori Kurokawa. 
Seichoku Nakamura. 
Kencho Suyematsu. 



Chorei Shimada. 

K5 Kawada. 
Fumio Nan jo. 



EIGAKUHAKUSHI. 



May, 1888. Keisuke Ito. 

" . " Eyokiclii Yatabe. 

" '* Dairoku Kikuchi. 

June, 1888. Hisashi Terao. 

'' " Naokiclii Matsui. 

" " Joji Sakurai. 



Nagayoshi Nagai. 
Kenjiro Yamakawa. 

Bunjij'o Koto. 
Kakichi Mitsukuri. 



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194 NUMBEE OF STUDENTS, ETC. 

STUDENTS ON THE EOLL. 

I. — University Hall 37 

n — College of Law 307 

Post-graduates 5 

Law (First Division) 116 

'' (Second '' ) 64 

'' (Third '' ) 43 

Politics 65 

Elective Students 14 

ni— College of Medicine 238 

Post-graduates 3 

Students undergoing Final Examina- 
tions • 44 

Medicine 126 

Pharmacy , 8 

Elective Students 57 

IV. — College of Engineering 105 

Post-graduates 2 

Civil Engineering 30 

Mechanical Engineering 7 

Naval Architecture 6 

Technology of Arms 2 

Electrical Engineering 7 

Architecture 10 

Applied Chemistry 6 

Technology of Explosives 1 

Mining and Metallurgy : 8 



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.'ntjmber of students, etc. 195 

Elective Students 26 

V. — College of Literature 68 

Post-graduates 4 

Philosophy 7 

Japanese Literature 5 

History 4 

Comparative Philology 1 

English Literature 1 

German Literature 2 

Pedagogical Course 11 

Elective Students 33 

VL— College of Science 78 

Post-graduates 10 

Mathematics 4 

Astronomy 1 

Physics 6 

Chemistry 4 

Zoology 1 

Botany 1 

Zoology and Botany 4 

Geology 2 

Elective Students 5 

Temporary Special Elementary Course . . 40 

Grand Total 833 

Counted more than once 23 

Actual Number of the Grand Total. 810 



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196 NUMBER OF STUDENTS, ETC. 

Students undergoing Final Examina- 
tions 44 

Post-graduates and Undergraduates 614 

Actual Number of the Above 591 

Elective Students 175 

NUMBER OF GAKUSHI A1>[D GRADUATES. 

Hogakushi 182 

Igakushi 301 

Kogakushi 290 

Bungahushi 62 

Eigakushi 176 

SeiyakusM 34 

Jun-igakushi 6 

Graduates of the late Kobu-Daigakko. • • 21 

Total 1072 

Counted more than once • • • 1 

Alive •.1025 

Dead 46 

NUMBER OF HAKUSHL 

Hdgakuhakushi 10 

Igakuhakushi 10 

KdgakuhakusM 10 

Bungakuhakushi 10 

Bigakuhakushi 10 

Total 50 



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APPENDIX. 197 

APPENDIX. 

PRESIDENT WATANABE'S ADDRESS. 
On tlie Occasion of the Graduation Ceremony, Jnly lOtli, 1889. 

Your Imperial Highnesses, Your Excellencies, and 
Gentlemen : — The present graduation ceremony'' is the 
fourth that has taken place since the founding of the 
University. Certificates of inestimable value to their 
recipients have now been conferred on one hundred and 
eighteen graduates of the five Colleges as rewards for their 
diligence during a number of years. ,In congratulating 
the graduates on this auspicious occasion, I desire to 
have the honour of making a brief general report of the 
most salient events that have occurred in the University 
during the academic year now ending, and of the prospects 
and probable changes in the near future. Let me first 
refer to the College of Law. 

The English, French and German divisions of Law 
are now called by the new designations of the First, 
Second and Third divisions of Law, and some changes 
have taken place in the curricula of instruction 
in these departments. Mr. S. Uyemura, an Assistant- 
Professor, resigned his post during the year, and Mr. K. 
Okano took his place. Professors C.B. Storrs and G. 
Appert, having left the University on the expiration of 
their terms of engagement, Messrs. A. Tison and A. 
Eevilliod were invited from America and France respect- 
ively to succeed them, the former as Professor of English 
Law, the latter of French Law. Professor K. Einoshita 



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198 APPENDIX. 

was aj)pointecl director of the First Higher Middle School, 
in addition to his professional duties in the College. Mr. 
I. Tajiri was appointed Lecturer on Money and 
Banking, and Judge E. Ono, Lecturer on Criminal 
Pleading. The graduates in the preceding year were 
59 in the Section of Law, — viz.: 11 in the English and 31 
in the French division — and 13 in Politics. Of these, 1 
went abroad for study, 3 entered the University Hall, 
37 received official appointments in the Judicial Department, 
1 in a bureau of the Cabinet, 2 in the Foreign Office, 3 in 
the Department of Agriculture and Commerce, 1 in the 
Treasury DejDartment, 2 were appointed teachers in 
Middle Schools, and the others are engaged in private 
practice. The graduates of this year number 25 in the 
first division of Law, 3 in the second and 11 in Politics, 
total 39. The number of students expected to enter the 
College next year is over 100 and that of the graduates 
will doubtless be in proportion. The students on the 
roll this year number 97 in the first, 35 in the Second, and 
31 in the Third divisions of Law, and 56 in Politics, 219 in 
all. Li addition to these, there are 42 elective students. 

Li the College of Medicine, a new course of Forensic 
Medicine and Clinical Lectures on the diseases of children 
has been added. Mr. H. Katayama, an Assistant-Professor, 
and Miss A. Vetch left the College during the year. 
Messrs Gr. Hamada, K Katayama, and J. Komoto returned 
from Germany after a period of study there, and were 
appointed Professors. The graduates in medicine in the 
preceding year were 29, of whom 3 went to Germany for 
further study, 6 were appointed medical officers of the 
army, 7 teachers in medical schools, 5 assistants in the 
College, and 7 are engaged in private practice. The 



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APPENDIX* 199 

graduates of this year are 43, and the College students 
206, of whom 7 belong to the section of Pharmacy. In 
addition to these there are 59 students in the elective 
course. In the coming year it is expected that about 40 
senior students will graduate and that 20 new ones will 
enter the College. During this year several professors 
were sent to various parts of the country for purposes 
of scientific investigation. Professor E. Koganei visited 
Yezo for anthropological researches. Professor K Osawa 
went to Narita, Chiba Ken to conduct investigations about 
fasting; and M. Y. Inoko was sent to Saitama Ken to 
collect specimens of poisonous fungi. Eeports on scien- 
tific investigations published in the Official Gazette are 
as follows: — Investigations as to cholera, and as to a 
certain disease that prevailed in Miura-gun, Kanagawa 
Ken, by professor H. Ogata; Deodorization and Analysis 
of sewerage in the University compounds, and investiga- 
tions on fishes and shells commonly used as human food, 
by Mr. J. Tsuboi; and Ventilation of the University 
Dormitories, by Professor M. Ogata and Mr. J. Tsuboi. 
Here I should not omit to mention that, last December, 
Her Imperial Majesty graciously presented to the invalids 
in the Hospital of the College, gifts of several suits of 
winter clothes, an act of generosity and mercy for which 
we cannot be too thankful. 

The removal of the Engineering College from Tora- 
no-mon to the new buildings in the University compound 
at Hongo, was commenced at the end of the last academic 
year and the college work has been going on since the 
begining of the present one. The large collections of 
siDecimens, models, &c., for various departments of 
engineering, which were formerly kept in the Museum 



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200; APPENDIX. 

at Tora-no-mon have been distributed among the several 
lecture rooms and placed under the care of their resj)ective 
Professors, to the great advantage both of Professors and 
students. The Lecturers a]3i)ointed in various depart- 
ments this year are as follows: — Mr. T. Yoshida, in 
Mechanical Engineering; Mr. S. Kurata, in Civil En- 
gineering; Mr. H. Tajima, in Mining and Metallurgy; Mr. 
T. Kusayama, in Architecture ; Mr. O. Asano, in Electrical 
Engineering; Mr. T. Nakahara, in Civil Engineering; Mr. 
J. Takayama, in Mining and Metallurgy; Mr. S. Kinoko, 
in Japanese Architecture; Mr. E. Sagane, in Industrial 
Economy and administrative Laws respecting Engineering 
works; and Mr. J. Conder, in Architecture. In addition 
to these Mr. L. Salabelle was requested to give instruction 
in French. As to changes of professors, Mr. K Kojima 
was aj)pointed Professor of Architecture and Mr. K. 
Noro, Professor of IMining and Metallurgy. Professor 
Furuichi resigned the post of Director ' of the College 
owing to his absence for some time from Japan, and 
President Watanabe has, since then, been acting in his 
place. Of the 35 graduates last year, 2 went abroad for 
further study, and the rest are engaged in engineering 
works, public and private, such as those in the Bureau of 
Works in the Home office, in the Bureau of Industry in the 
Department of Agriculture and Commerce, in the prefec- 
tures of Fukuoka, Shiga, Aichi, and Ibaraki, the Eailway 
Companies of Kansei, Koshu, Kiushu and Sanyo, in the 
!Nii)pon Doboku Kwaisha, in the Tokyo Electric Light Co., 
in the Kobe Electric Light Co., in the Tokyo Gas works, 
in the Hokkaido Sulj^hur Manufactory, &c. The graduates 
of this year are 20 in all, 9 in Civil Engineering, 2 in 
Mechanical Engineering, 1 in Naval Architecture, 3 in 



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APPENDIX, 201 

Elecirical Engineering, 4 in Applied Chemistry, and 1 in 
Mining and Metallurgy. In the coming year there will be 
27 graduates and 24 new students. At the close of this 
year the students number 71, in addition to 17 elective 
students. 

In the College of Literature, a Course of Japanese 
History has been added to the Historical division. 
Optional courses in History, Italian and Psycho-physics 
have been started. Special students, whose object 
is to qualify for teachers in the high and ordinary 
normal schools, have been assembled by the Educa- 
tion Department and placed under the guidance 
and control of the College. With regard to the teaching 
staff, Messrs Shigeno, Kume and Hoshino have been 
appointed Professors ; Mr. Yoshitani was appointed Lec- 
turer on Indian PhilosojDhy, and Mr Motora, Lecturer on 
Psycho-physics. Mr. XJyeda, Mr. Mugabure and Mr. 
Florenz have been appointed instructors in the English, 
French and German languages respectively. The grad- 
uates of the preceding year were 2, 1 in Philosophy and 

1 in Japanese Literature. One obtained an appointment 
in the Educational Department, and the other entered 
the University Hall. The graduates of the present year 
are 3 in Philosophy, 2 in Japanese Literature, and 1 in 
History, total 6. The students at the end of the present 
year number 8 in Philosophy, 4 in Japanese Literature? 
5 in History, 1 in Philology, 1 in English Literature, and 

2 in German Literature, total 21. There are 5 special 
students and 16 elective. Next j^ear there will be 8 grad- 
uates and 5 new students. A course of National History 
will also be added ; the Japanese Literature division wdll be 
designated by the new name of National Literature, and 



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202 APPENDIX. 

the ChinesG Literature by that of Chinese Classics. Some 
slight alterations in these divisions will also be made. 

Lastly, with regard to the College of Science, I have 
to inform you that, as the new College building has been 
completed, the offices and the lecture rooms for Mathe- 
matics, Physics and Chemistry, have been removed 
to it. Mr. Matsumura has been appointed Assistant-Pro- 
fessor in Botany. The graduates of the preceding year 
were 5. Two of these entered the University Hall ; one 
is ]Dursuing the post-graduate course ; one received an 
appointment in the Military, and one in the Naval, Depart- 
ment. The graduates of the present year are 2 in Mathe- 
matics, 1 in Astronomy, 2 in Chemistry, 2 in Zoology, 2 in 
Botany, and 1 in Geology, total 10. The number of stud- 
ents at the end of the present year is 25 ; namely, 5 in 
Mathematics, 1 in Astronomy, 4 in Physics, 5 in Chemistry, 
2 in Zoology, 2 in Botany, 4 in Biology, 2 in Geolog}^ 
In addition to these there are 6 elective students. In July, 
1888, when the eruption of Mount Bandai took place, 
Professor Sekiya and Assistant -Professor Kikuchi were 
sent to the spot for purposes of scientific observation and 
investigation. Three volumes of the Journal of the Science 
College have been published. Such are the general 
outlines of the present condition and future prospects of 
each of the ^ye Colleges of the University. 

Let me now turn to the principal events connected 
with the University in general. Councillor Furuichi 
resigned and Professor T. Iwaya succeeded him. Secretary'" 
K. Nagai was removed to the Education Department, 
and Professor K. Wadagaki succeeded him. In the Uni- 
versity Hall, there are 6 Ho-gakushi, 3 I-gakushi, 4 Ko- 
gakushi, 2 Bun-gakushi, and 6 Eigakushi, total 21. A 



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APPENDIX. 203 

loan scholarsliip fund sufficient to support 223 students 
is available, but actually only 154 — namely, 62 in the Law 
College, 24 in the Medical, 55 in the Engineering, 6 in 
the Literature, and 7 in the Science College — receive 
support from this source, and there is still left enough to 
maintain 69 students. I have pleasure in announcing the 
completion of the new dormitory, the replacement of petro- 
leum lamps by electric lights, and the introduction of a 
water-service. Plans for the extension of the library, the 
lecture rooms for natural history, the museum and the 
dormitory, are also nearly elaborated. Further, I have to 
announce that the temporary board for the compilation of 
National History has been annexed to the Lnperial 
University, simultaneously with the addition of a course 
of National History in the College of Literature — an act 
calculated to promote interest in, and to add to, the value 
of the science of History on the one side, and of the 
Sciences of Law, Politics and Political Economy on the 
other, since it cannot fail to develop inductive and 
historical methods of study. 

While congratulating ourselves on these topics, I 
must not forget to remind you of some dark pages in 
the history of the present academic year, namely the 
much lamented death of Viscount Mori, and the un- 
fortunate fire in the Dormitory. Such have been the 
salient events during the academic year extending from 
September, 1888, to the present day. There have been 
some incidents which we greatly lament ; yet upon the 
whole, I am in a position to say that marked progress 
is apparent in the history of the educational career of 
the Imperial University. This surely is due to the virtue 
of His Lnperial Majesty the Emperor on the one hand, 



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204 appendix; 

and to the wise counsels find energetic assistance of His 
Majesty's Ministers on the other. The Constitution of our 
father -land has been already proclaimed. Within a year 
some of the most important articles contained therein will 
come into force. Our trade and intercourse with 
different nations are increasing* day by day. What can 
be more important for the preservation of peace and 
good order in the land, and for the strengthening of 
the foundations of the Empire than the moral and in- 
tellectual improvement of the nation? The only way 
to secure this improvement is to deepen the fountain 
of knowledge and science. And who, I ask, is responsible 
for this task? The Im^Derial University, Greatly as we 
do and must wish for progress and improvement in the 
laws and institutions of our country, equally earnestly 
do and must we desire to lay our foundations so that the 
Imperial University may act as a guide and pioneer of 
civilization and thus fulfil its duty to the state and to the 
loeople. We have to-da}^ j)^i'^^i'^^<^^ ^^^® graduation cere- 
mony, when, for the first time since the establishment of 
the Imperial University, the students of the four Colleges 
of Law, Engineering, Literature, and Science have 
completed their academic course of three years. This 
again is the first graduation ceremony since the accession 
of His Excellency Viscount Enomoto to the iDosition of 
Minister of Education, made vacant by the death of the 
late Viscount Mori. This again is a time when, with the 
memories of the glorious proclamation of the Imperial 
Constitution still fresh, a new phase of the State's life is 
about to reveal itself, and when people's minds are stirred 
about the structure and constitution of the University 
itself. The celebration of to-day marks a distinct and 



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APPENDIX. 205 

important period in the history of the University. I am 
sorry to inform you that His Imperial Majesty, ^ho 
graciously intended to visit our University to-day, is 
prevented from doing so by indisposition. But His 
Majesty's good-will toward the University is not to be 
overlooked nor forgotten. And it is the sacred duty 
of all of us, who, whether as professors or as adminis- 
trative officers, or as graduates of the University, are 
connected with this institution, to remember this great 
day and to do our best to promote the interests and 
prosperity of the University. In conclusion, let us res- 
pectfully pray for the health, the happiness and the 
glory of His Imperial Majesty the Emperor, and of Her 
Imperial Majesty the Empress, and for the prosperity 
of the Imperial University. 



THE END. 



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